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  • 1.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Cancer patients' motives for psychosocial consultation: Oncology social workers' perceptions of 226 patient cases2018In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1180-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although oncology social workers (OSWs) have emerged as a core profession in the provision of psychosocial  services, there is a lack of empirical studies that describe their daily clinical work with patients. The overall aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' motives for consulting an OSW.

    Methods: From a nationwide survey, we used data from 226 patient cases that OSWs met face to face. The OSWs were asked to describe how the case was referred to them, the patient's characteristics, and what they perceived as the patient's motives for contacting them as well as additional motives that came up during the consultations.

    Results: Patients have different motives for consulting an OSW, and these motives change over the course of consultations; while feeling associated with being diagnosed with cancer were often the initial motive, questions associated with moving on in life and dealing with relationships and the overall life situation were added over time.

    Conclusions: The results show that Swedish OSWs' function is multifaceted and that the initial motives among patients rarely predicts the content in consultations over time. Based on the diversity of motives, it seems obvious that OSWs (at least in Sweden) need a broad education in the psychology of counselling. It also seems obvious that even if patients initially were referred by health care staff to the OSW due to psychological reactions to being ill, staff should also be attentive to the fact that relational and socio-economic/juridical issues are of great concern for the patients.

  • 2.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Next of kin's motives for psychosocial consultation: Oncology social workers' perceptions of 54 next of kin cases2019In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 154-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although oncology social workers (OSWs) have emerged as a core profession in the provision of psychosocial services, there is a lack of empirical studies that describe their daily clinical work with next of kin (NOK). The overall aim of this study was to explore NOK's motives for consulting an OSW. This can provide us with insights into what types of skills OSWs need to have in order to fulfil their duties.

    Methods: From a nationwide survey, we used data from 54 NOK cases that Swedish OSWs met face to face.

    Results: About half of the motives concerned help in dealing with personal grief connected to the patients' cancer and distressing symptoms, while the other half concerned needs for help in dealing with the position of being the NOK, relationship conflicts, and assistance with socio‐economic issues.

    Conclusions: The motives show that NOK does not just ask for help to come to terms with distress related to the patient's situation. Based on the diversity of motives, we suggest that OSWs (at least in Sweden) need a broad education in counselling psychology. Furthermore, health care personnel need to be attentive to the NOK's own voice and not reduce it to the voice of the patient and the patient's needs in referrals.

  • 3.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The role and function of Swedish oncology social workers2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 26, p. 67-67, article id 271Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Laurell, Göran
    Different transitions in returning to everyday life for patients with head and neck cancer: a qualitative prospective study2016In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 25, no SP. S3, p. 95-95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Kero, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Admission into a helping plan: a watershed between positive and negative experiences in breast cancer2010In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 806-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer patients are in an exposed situation that raises certain psychosocial needs in contact with health care. Previous studies have mainly investigated these needs by assessments on predefined categories.Objective: The purpose of the present study is, from the patients' perspective, to identify breast cancer patients' psychosocial needs, and to synthesise them in a model reflecting the core of these needs.Methods: Seventy-one patients treated with radition therapy were consecutively included and repeatedly interviewed about their experiences of health care. 'Critical incidents' where identified from the interviews and analysed due to the similarities-differences technique in grounded theory.Results: Four categories of needs where detected: 'access', 'information', 'treatment', and 'how approached'. These categories and their properties merged into a core category - 'admission into a helping plan'. These findings are well understood in terms of attachment theory. In times of immanent danger and stress people strive to fina a 'safe haven' to attach to. Cancer patients' 'safe haven' can be described as 'a helping plan'. It is not the result of a separate patient-caregiver relationship but is created by a pattern of individual experiences from all kind of contacts with the health-care system as a whole.Conclusions: The presented model of patients needs as converging into 'admission into a helping plan' may serve as an easily comprehendible model for caregivers, guiding them to contribute to the patient's feeling of security and trust, and thus to the patient's own 'hoope work'.

  • 6.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Social work in oncology: an empirical study of patient contacts during a 12‐month period2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 26, p. 66-67, article id 645Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Kero, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Breast Cancer Experience Through the Body: A Consecutive, Six-Year Longitudinal Study of 24 Women2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, p. 334-334Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a disruptive s bodies in body experiences in a life context are not sufficiently acknowledged in breast cancer research. Due to the increasing number of breast cancer survivors, longitudinal studies that pay attention to long-term experiences of the body are of vital importance in order to gain knowledge valuable for rehabilitation initiatives. This study is a contribution.

    four women were consecutively included in a prospective project and repeatedly interviewed during 6 years from ending hospitalised treatment. The qualitative analysis was made by means of thematic narrative analysis. Out of the interviews individual narratives were constructed s body experience over time. The narratives were repeatedly read to identify possible common thematic elements across participants of how the body appeared to the women and to discern processes of how this developed over time. Three main processes were found in the analysis.

    RESULTS: Common to all women was to initially experience the body as surviving. Survival was key target and bodily complaints were thus measured and valued in favour of that. When back to a new everyday life after treatment five women quickly experienced their bodies as comprehensible. They had undergone a minimum of treatments. 19 women reported more complaints and experienced the body as broken, fragile and as incomprehensible. With time and regained function most came to experience their bodies as comprehensible. Three women, however, met with more bodily decline than they could reconcile, they eventually disassociated from their bodies.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study makes a unique contribution by mapping out how breast cancer patients experience and value their bodies over 6 years from ending hospitalised treatment. The findings are considered from a phenomenological perspective and reflect how the women “discovered” and handled their bodies as something they had, the bodies were seen as separated from themselves while altering and changing due to side effects. The processes of establishing liveable body relations differed depending on treatment impact and ability to incorporate body changes as part of themselves. The findings are discussed in relation to theories of bodynormativity and biographical continuity.

    RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: The study clarifies that experiences and valuations of body alterations and side effects shifts over time. It indicates the importance of further studies to carefully consider this transition over time and interpret selfassessments of body experience in relation to treatment (on-going/completed) and overall life context (on sick-leave/working).

    CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study highlights the impact of side effects, especially from endocrine treatment, on breast cancer patients’ everyday life. We find it reasonable to suggest that physicians take a quite humble stand when discussing the treatment options. In cases of massive side effects, it must be possible to end treatment without this causing excessive worries for disease progression.

  • 8.
    Martinsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Swedish Register of Palliative Care, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Patients’ perception of information from physicians during palliative chemotherapy: a qualitative study2016In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 495-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: During the course of their disease, patients with cancer receiving palliative chemotherapy receive extensive amounts of information from physicians. The objective of our study was to describe patients' perspectives on the information they received from physicians during palliative chemotherapy with regard to their cancer diagnosis, treatments, prognosis, and future planning.

    Method: A total of 15 semistructured face-to-face interviews with patients who had incurable cancer were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three categories were defined during the analytical process: “having a chronic disease,” “depending on chemotherapy,” and “living with an unpredictable future.”

    Significance of results: Our study demonstrated that patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy perceived that their disease was incurable and chronic, that they were dependent on chemotherapy, and that their future was uncertain. Compared with other studies, the patients in our study seemed to be more aware of their prognosis and the goals of care.

  • 9. Mattsson, E
    et al.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University.
    Ljungman, G
    von Essen, L
    Positive and negative consequences with regard to cancer during adolescence. Experiences two years after diagnosis.2007In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 1003-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose was to explore negative and positive consequences of cancer during adolescence experienced two years after diagnosis. METHODS: Two years after diagnosis 38 persons, 15-21 years old, were asked two questions over the telephone: What, if anything, is bad for you due to the cancer disease? and What, if anything, is good for you due to the cancer disease? The answers were analysed by content analysis. RESULTS: Four categories of negative experiences were identified: a problematic body; unpleasant thoughts and feelings; outside the circle of friends; and difficulties with schoolwork. Six categories of positive experiences were identified: a more positive view of life; good self-esteem; knowledge and experience with regard to disease and hospital care; good relations; broader perspectives; and material gains. CONCLUSIONS: Two years after diagnosis those struck by cancer during adolescence experience not only a number of negative, but also positive, consequences of the cancer disease and its treatment.

  • 10. Robertson, Lindsay
    et al.
    Richards, Rosalina
    Egan, Richard
    Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Promotion and support of physical activity among cancer survivors: a service provider perspective2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 441-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Cancer survivors are a population group at higher risk of a number of adverse health outcomes. Physical activity during and post-treatment is beneficial, yet participation in physical activity tends to be low amongst cancer survivors. There is still much to be learnt about how service providers can successfully translate research evidence about the benefits of physical activity for cancer survivors into effective and widely available interventions to support physical activity participation. The aim of this qualitative study is to describe some of the current approaches used by the Cancer Society of New Zealand (CSNZ) to supporting physical activity among survivors and the opportunities and challenges associated with this. Methods Participants were Supportive Care Managers and representatives of the CSNZ. A generic qualitative approach included semi-structured interviews, transcription, member checking and analysis via thematic coding by two of the research team. Results Four major themes frame the discussion of the results: (i) existing physical activity programmes and resources for cancer survivors; (ii) gaps and needs in the provision of physical activity programmes for cancer survivors; (iii) barriers, facilitators and preferences in relation to physical activity participation; and (iv) considerations for service providers involved in developing physical activity programmes for cancer survivors. Conclusions The implications for future research and for service provision of physical activity programmes for cancer survivors are discussed. Potential strategies to increase physical activity participation among cancer survivors are put forward.

  • 11.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Attributions of lung cancer: my own illness is hardly caused by smoking2007In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 587-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People experiencing unexpected negative events tend to make sense of the situation through causal attributions. It seems that having some sort of answer to “why-me” makes the event less shattering and the world more controllable. We know for instance that the great majority of women with breast cancer tend to have clear ideas about its causes. Lung cancer, in contrast to breast cancer, has a well-known significant cause, as smoking explains about 80% of the incidence. This paper deals with the attribution process in lung cancer. It examines how lung cancer patients attribute the cause to their disease and how this relates to an understanding of how people deal with strain. Twenty-three patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were consecutively followed by means of repeated interviews throughout the course of the disease. It emerged that among the smokers the most common attribution was “don’t know” – smoking was not seen as the prime cause to their cancer. This finding is discussed in relation to the few earlier somewhat contradictory studies that exist and it is argued that the finding is according well with the concept of ‘disavowal’ being the central process concerned in dealing with strain.

  • 12.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Everyday life as a bridge over troubled water2016In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 347-348Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    "Increasing value and reducing waste” in psychosocial research demands more efforts in scrutinizing study designs2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1439-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    It's futile to believe that RCT studies will steer us to Godot2011In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 333-334Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Motives that cancer patients in oncological care have for consulting a psychologist: an empirical study2010In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Objective: Most people with cancer are able to deal with the mental turmoil with support from ordinary health care, family and friends. However, by themselves or by attentive health-care workers some patients are referred to specialists within the psychosocial field, foremost social workers and psychologists. This paper deals with patients’ motives for seeing a psychologist. Methods: The case books for all patients who had met with the psychologist at a department of oncology in Sweden during a 10-year period were read through and categorised according to what the patients wanted to talk about. Results: The most commonly found motives were in sliding order: coping with anxiety and worries caused by the disease; dealing with relational problems in life outside the disease; dealing with relational problems actualised by the disease; living with a malignant diseasedespair in a new life situation; and finally dealing with a particular problem. Conclusion: Patients seeing a psychologist in oncology do not just ask for help to come to terms with anxiety and worries. More than a third of the patients wanted to talk about distressing relationships, which were not connected to, or only remotely connected to the cancer disease. Patients have different needs and competence in different psychological treatment perspectives is therefore important. The found diversity of motives bears impact on the external validity of screening instruments for distress and randomised controlled intervention studies.

  • 16.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Skilled statistics cannot ove rcome the absence of a meaningful design2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 286-286Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    "Spirituality" hardly facilitates our understanding of existential distress - but "everyday life" might2018In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 2654-2656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existential predicament of being human might come to the fore when we are stricken by cancer, perhaps primarily because we are removed from the shelter inherent in our routines of everyday life. These routines might help us to deal with the ultimate concerns of life, ie, isolation, freedom, meaninglessness, and death.1 We recognise these conceptualisations from European existential philosophy. However, instead of discussing the existential challenge in these terms, it has become far more popular in the scientific literature to instead make use of “spirituality” as a frame of reference. Broadly speaking, there has been a roughly 26‐fold increase in the number of papers focused on “spirituality” from the 1980s to the 2000s,2 and nearly all studies on “spiritual care” have emanated from the United States and the United Kingdom.3

    In this paper, I will briefly scrutinise the concept of “spirituality” first by critically reflecting on how the concept is constructed, defined, and made use of; in other words, what are “spirituality” researchers talking about? Second, I will question its validity, and third I will question the legitimacy of the cherished research concluding that “spirituality” alleviates distress and promotes well‐being. Finally, I will briefly, as roughly outlined above, suggest that “everyday life,” a bottom‐up perspective grounded in the patients' way of living their lives, might be a more fruitful conceptualisation that we should pay attention to in order to widen our scope when it comes to understanding how patients deal with distress.

  • 18.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Statistical efficiency cannot save a study without a meaningful hypothesis2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 2156-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    The question remains: what is a 'spiritual' world view in relation to a secular or a religious world view? A reply to comments made about my letter questioning the 'spirituality' concept [1].2007In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 260-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Who needs the concept of spirituality?2006In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 647-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Why doesn't mind matter when we are to find out what is helpful?2011In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 441-442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Salander, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergknut, Mirjam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    The creation of hope in patients with lung cancer2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no S3, p. 373-374Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Salander, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Gender differences in patient´s written narratives when being diagnosed with cancer2005In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 685-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The medical field has shown a growing interest in gender and gender differences. In psychosocial oncology, for example, some studies suggest that men and women cope differently with cancer; e.g. women express their emotions more readily than men do, and men rely more on their healthy spouse.

    Using a qualitative perspective, this study examines 83 narratives written by male and female cancer patients who were asked to write down how they experienced receiving their cancer diagnosis. The narratives were analyzed both as to structure and content.

    The women wrote longer, more personally, and more emotionally than the men, and to a greater extent they included family members and other relatives in their stories. When the men mentioned relatives, they mainly referred to their spouse. Men and women commented differently as to their experiences of ‘reception’; i.e. how their psychological needs were addressed and ‘connection’; i.e. whether they felt in sufficient contact with medical staff. Although the women described good reception, they complained a lot about bad connection. Among the men, it was just as common to report about positive as negative experiences in both categories.

    There are reasons to be cautious when evaluating these findings. The found differences may be due to different ways of reacting to similar situations or different willingness and ways of commenting on similar situations, but also to different reception and connection for men and women. Further research should focus on the basic question: Are men and women without medical reasons being treated differently during their oncological treatment?

  • 24.
    Salander, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Granström, Brith
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Öron- näs- och halssjukdomar.
    How patients make use of a specialist nurse function in head and neck cancer: an empirical study2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no Special issue S3, p. 159-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Salander, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    To carry on as before: A meta-synthesis of qualitative studies in lung cancer2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 26, p. 81-82, article id P-002Article in journal (Other academic)
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