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  • 1.
    Brooks, Clem
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, 1020 E. Kirkwood Ave., Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-7103, USA.
    Svallfors, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Why does class matter?: Policy attitudes, mechanisms, and the case of the Nordic countries2010In: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, ISSN 0276-5624, E-ISSN 1878-5654, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 199-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most democracies, classes tend to vary with respect to an array of attitudes and behaviours, and differences are large within a number of European polities. What mechanisms lie behind these differences? Do they relate primarily to individuals’ material interests, as assumed by traditional class theories, or instead, to socialization and self-selection factors? This paper seeks to extend theory and research through an analysis of mechanisms behind class differences in policy attitudes. Our focus is on the Nordic countries, where class differences are extensive and well-documented in past scholarship. We take advantage of high-quality European Social Survey data for Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Analyzing three policy arenas and the 9-category European Socio-economic Classification scheme (ESeC), we find evidence that class-related factors help to explain cleavages in attitudes. Comparisons with the more detailed, 103-category International Standard Classification of Occupation scheme (ISCO) suggest that these factors explain less “micro-class” occupational variation. Results shed new light on mechanisms behind class differences, and the empirical foundations of established class theories. These and other implications are discussed in the conclusion.

  • 2.
    Vossemer, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Losing standard employment in Germany: The consequences of displacement and dismissal for workers’ subsequent careers2019In: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, ISSN 0276-5624, E-ISSN 1878-5654, Vol. 63, article id 100420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the effects of job loss on workers’ subsequent careers in Germany. To provide a comprehensive picture, I distinguish between displacement due to plant closure and dismissal and simultaneously analyze the effects on workers’ subsequent labor market statuses, labor incomes, and non-standard employment risks. The results show that both events have lasting negative effects. Five years after job loss, displaced and dismissed workers have 12 and 15 percentage point lower employment chances respectively. Although this is mostly explained by higher unemployment risks, more than a third is due to displaced and dismissed workers leaving the labor force entirely, especially via (early) retirement. Moreover, I find large short-term total labor income losses which are mainly explained by lower employment chances and reduced working hours but falls in hourly wages become relatively more important as time passes. Five years after job loss, the negative effects on hourly wages still amount to 6 percent for displaced workers and 8 percent for workers who were dismissed. With respect to non-standard employment, I show that both displacement and dismissal increase the risks of self-employment, part-time employment, and temporary employment with only the latter being transitional in nature.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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More languages
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