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  • 1. Bergman, Ingela
    et al.
    Påsse, Tore
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Zachrisson, Olle
    Hörnberg, Greger
    Hellberg, Erik
    Bohlin, Elisabeth
    Isostatic land uplift and Mesolithic landscapes: lake tilting, a key to the discovery of Mesolithic sites in the interior of Northern Sweden2003Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 30, nr 11, s. 1451-1458Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently only a few Mesolithic sites were known from the interior of N. Sweden, although extensive archaeological surveys have been carried out since the 1950s. The lack of archaeological data made every attempt to interpret the process of pioneer colonization quite fruitless. In this paper we present a model of non-uniform glacio-isostatic uplift and lake-tilting used to identify potential areas of Mesolithic habitation. By reconstructing shoreline displacement of ancient lakes, archaeological, palaeoecological and geological studies have resulted in the discovery of a significant number of Mesolithic sites and of an early post-glacial landscape previously unknown.

  • 2.
    Bindler, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Segerström, Ulf
    Pettersson-Jensen, Ing-Marie
    Berg, Anna
    Hansson, Sophia
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Holmström, Harald
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Olsson, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Renberg, Ingemar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Early medieval origins of iron mining and settlement in central Sweden: multiproxy analysis of sediment and peat records from the Norberg mining district2011Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, nr 2, s. 291-300Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The historical Norberg mining district in central Sweden with its shallow, easily accessible iron ores figures prominently in the earliest documents from the 14th century concerning mining or metallurgy. This 1000-km2 district is considered to be one of the first areas in Sweden exploited for iron ores and, in fact, Europe’s oldest known blast furnace, Lapphyttan, is located in the Norberg district about 10 km from the mines in the village of Norberg (Norbergsby). Earlier archaeological excavations suggest the furnace was in operation as early as the 11th or 12th century (870 and 930 14C yr BP), and a number of other sites in the district have been dated to the 13th–15th centuries. Here, we have analyzed two lake sediment records (Kalven and Noren) from the village of Norberg and a peat record from Lapphyttan. The Lapphyttan peat record was radiocarbon dated, whereas the sediment from Kalven is annually laminated, which provides a fairly precise chronology. Our pollen data indicate that land use in the area began gradually as forest grazing by at least c. AD 1050, with indications of more widespread forest disturbance and cultivation from c. 1180 at Lapphyttan and 1250 at Kalven. Based on 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios in Kalven’s varved sediment record, there is an indication of mining or metallurgy in the area c. 960, but likely not in immediate connection to our sites. Evidence of mining and metallurgy increases gradually from c. 1180 when there is a decline in 206Pb/207Pb ratios and an increase in charcoal particles at Lapphyttan, followed by increasing inputs of lithogenic elements in Noren’s sediment record indicating soil disturbance, which we attribute to the onset of mining the iron ore bodies surrounding Noren. From AD 1295 onwards evidence of mining and metallurgy are ubiquitous, and activities accelerate especially during the late 15th century; the maximum influence of Bergslagen ore lead (i.e., the minimum in 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios) in both Kalven and Noren occurs c. 1490–1500, when also varve properties change in Kalven and in Noren sharp increases occur in the concentrations of a range of other ore-related metals (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, mercury and zinc). From the 15th century onwards mining and metallurgy are the dominant feature of the sediment records.

  • 3.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Institute of Geography, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Olofsson, Johan
    Uppsala Municipal Council, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Integrating human dimensions of Arctic palaeoenvironmental science: SEAD – the strategic environmental archaeology database2011Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, nr 2, s. 345-351Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental change has a human dimension, and has had so for at least the last 10 000 years. The prehistoric impact of people on the Arctic landscape has occasionally left visible traces, such as house and field structures. More often than not, however, the only evidence available is at the microscopic or geochemical level, such as fossil insect and seed assemblages or changes in the physical and chemical properties of soils and sediments. These records are the subject of SEAD, a multidisciplinary database and software project currently underway at Umeå University, Sweden, which aims to create an online database and set of tools for investigating these traces, as part of an international research infrastructure for palaeoecology and environmental archaeology.

  • 4.
    Garrison, Thomas G.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Chapman, Bruce
    Houston, Stephen
    Roman, Edwin
    Garrido Lopez, Jose Luis
    Discovering ancient Maya settlements using airborne radar elevation data2011Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, nr 7, s. 1655-1662Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the results of using NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar data (AIRSAR) to detect ancient Maya settlements beneath jungle canopy in Guatemala. AIRSAR stands out from previous applications of radar remote sensing in the Maya lowlands because of its canopy-penetrating capabilities. The authors offer an overview of the AIRSAR technology, followed by a case study in which the AIRSAR data receive testing in the field. Reconnaissance in the region around the Maya site of El Zotz led to the discovery of two new sites, including the medium-sized settlement of La Avispa. AIRSAR also aided archaeologists in detecting zones of residential settlement around the site core of El Zotz. This research will serve as a guide for future applications of radar remote sensing in Maya archaeology. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Linderholm, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå marina forskningscentrum (UMF).
    Chemical characterisation of various archaeological soil samples using main and trace elements determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry1994Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 303-314Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a method has been developed to classify archaeologically related soil samples by means of multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis) of determined trace and main component concentrations. The Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) technique was used for the determination of Fe, As, Cu, P, Mn, V, Co, Mo, Zn, Cr, Pb and Ca, and good accuracy was achieved by calibration against a certified reference material. It was shown that Cu, P, Mn, Zn and Ca were accumulated in feature and dwelling samples from a late bronze age site, Vistad, in southeast Sweden. Elements like Fe, V, Co and Cr characterized the control samples (from a surrounding field). It was also demonstrated that in this case, a simpler pretreatment procedure—acid extraction—could be used instead of total dissolution of the samples. Microwave heating was utilized for both procedures.

  • 6. López-Merino, Lourdes
    et al.
    Martínez Cortizas, Antonio
    Reher, Guillermo S.
    López-Sáez, Jóse A.
    Mighall, Tim M.
    Bindler, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Reconstructing the impact of human activities in a NW Iberian Roman mining landscape for the last 2500 years2014Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 50, s. 208-218Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the impact of human activities during Roman times on NW Iberian mining landscapes beyond the geomorphological transformations brought about by the use of hydraulic power for gold extraction. We present the high-resolution pollen record of La Molina mire, located in an area intensely used for gold mining (Asturias, NW Spain), combined with other proxy data from the same peat core to identify different human activities, evaluate the strategies followed for the management of the resources and describe the landscape response to human disturbances. We reconstructed the timing and synchronicity of landscape changes of varying intensity and form occurred before, during and after Roman times. An open landscape was prevalent during the local Late Iron Age, a period of relatively environmental stability. During the Early Roman Empire more significant vegetation shifts took place, reflected by changes in both forest (Corylus and Quercus) and heathland cover, as mining/metallurgy peaked and grazing and cultivation increased. In the Late Roman Empire, the influence of mining/metallurgy on landscape change started to disappear. This decoupling was further consolidated in the Germanic period (i.e., Visigothic and Sueve domination of the region), with a sharp decrease in mining/metallurgy but continued grazing. Although human impact was intense in some periods, mostly during the Early Roman Empire, forest regeneration occurred afterwards: clearances were local and short-lived. However, the Roman mining landscape turned into an agrarian one at the onset of the Middle Ages, characterized by a profound deforestation at a regional level due to a myriad of human activities that resulted in an irreversible openness of the landscape.

  • 7. Valamoti, Soultana Maria
    et al.
    Marinova, Elena
    Heiss, Andreas G.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Petridou, Chryssa
    Popova, Tzvetana
    Michou, Stavroula
    Papadopoulou, Lambrini
    Chrysostomou, Panagiotis
    Darcque, Pascal
    Grammenos, Dimitrios
    Iliev, Stanislav
    Kotsos, Stavros
    Koukouli-Chrysanthaki, Chaido
    Leshtakov, Krassimir
    Malamidou, Dimitria
    Merousis, Nikos
    Nikolov, Vassil
    Nikov, Krassimir
    Panayotova, Krastina
    Papanthimou, Aikaterini
    Popov, Hristo
    Stefani, Liana
    Tsirtsoni, Zoï
    Ruseva, Tatjana Kanceva
    Prehistoric cereal foods of southeastern Europe: An archaeobotanical exploration2019Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 104, s. 97-113Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses for the first time a large body of archaeobotanical data from prehistoric Southeastern Europe, mostly published for the first time, that correspond to cereal food preparations. The evidence presented here comes from 20 sites situated in Greece and Bulgaria, spanning the Early Neolithic through to the Iron Age (7th millennium B.C.-1st millennium B.C.). The remains correspond to cereal fragments or agglomerations of fragments that resulted from ancient food preparation steps such as grinding, boiling, sprouting/malting, mixing in bread-like or porridge-like foodstuffs. The article builds on previous pilot studies and with the aid of stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy offers a first classification and possible interpretations of the finds leading to the recipes that might have generated them. At the same time the article highlights the significance of retrieving and studying in depth such rare archaeobotanical finds, points out the interpretative problems stemming from such material and suggests ways forward to address similar archaeological finds in different parts of the world. The paper demonstrates the potential of the systematic study of cereal-based food remains, in our case prehistoric Southeastern Europe, to reveal a wide variability in cereal food transformation practices, suggestive of the interplay between available ingredients, cultural traditions and the complex interaction between society and environment.

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