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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Backlund, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sahlén, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Technology transfers and the clean development mechanism in a north-south general equilibrium model2010In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 292-309Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the potential welfare gains of introducing a technology transfer from Annex I to non-Annex I in order to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Our analysis is based on a numerical general equilibrium model for a world-economy comprising two regions; North (Annex I) and South (non-Annex I). In a cooperative equilibrium, a technology transfer from the North to the South is clearly desirable from the perspective of a ‘global social planner’, since the welfare gain for the South outweighs the welfare loss for the North. However, if the regions do not cooperate, then the incentives to introduce the technology transfer appear to be relatively weak from the perspective of the North; at least if we allow for Southern abatement in the pre-transfer Nash equilibrium. Finally, by adding the emission reductions associated with the Kyoto agreement, our results show that the technology transfer leads to higher welfare in both regions.

  • 2.
    B. Krishnamurthy, Chandra Kiran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Kriström, Bengt
    SLU Umeå.
    A cross-country analysis of residential electricity demand in 11 OECD-countries2015In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 39, p. 68-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide consistent, cross-country estimates of price and income elasticity for households in 11 OECD countries. Using survey data from 2011 on annual consumption of electricity and sample-derived average electricity price, we provide country-specific price elasticity estimates and average income elasticity estimates. For most countries in our sample, we find strong price responsiveness, with elasticities varying (in absolute value) between 0.27 for South Korea and 1.4 for Australia, and higher than 0.5 for most countries. Exploiting the presence of many attitudinal indicators in the dataset, we provide evidence that non-price related factors to affect energy demand; in particular, households' self-reported energy savings behaviour reduces demand between 2 and 4%. In contrast, we find very weak income responsiveness, with income elasticities varying from 0.07 to 0.16 and no evidence for heterogeneity across the countries in our sample. Our results regarding price elasticity are in contrast with those of many existing studies which find low-to-moderate price responsiveness, and adds to a few recent studies indicating more policy space for demand reduction than previously thought.

  • 3.
    Broberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    An alternative interpretation of multiple bounded WTP data - Certainty dependent payment card intervals2008In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 30, p. 555-567Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Geijer, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Damned if you do, damned if you do not: reduced climate impact vs. sustainable forests in Sweden2011In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 94-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the potential goal conflict between two of Sweden's environmental objectives: Sustainable Forests and Reduced Climate Impact – or, more precisely, the conflict between forest conservation and the supply of wood fuel. To accomplish this, we use a forest sector model that includes the suppliers and major users of roundwood. The econometric results, based on a data set that spans 40 years, show that all the own price elasticities have the expected signs. Among the three forestry products, the supply and (long-term) demand of forest fuel seems to be most sensitive to a price change. In a second step, the estimated model is used to simulate the effect of increased forest conservation – the Sustainable Forest objective – on the supply of wood fuel. If oil is used as a substitute, Swedish emissions of greenhouse gases will increase by almost 0.92 percent, which indicates a clear conflict with the Reduced Climate Impact objective.

  • 5. Lundgren, Tommy
    et al.
    Marklund, Per-Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). CERE, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Umeå University and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Zhang, Shanshan
    Industrial energy demand and energy efficiency - Evidence from Sweden2016In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 43, p. 130-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper estimates firm level energy demand and energy efficiency for 14 sectors in Swedish manufacturing using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). We derive sector level energy demand frontiers that account for firm specific heterogeneity. Results show that there is potential to improve energy efficiency for fuel and electricity use in all sectors; energy intensity is not an appropriate proxy for energy efficiency; the EU ETS had a modest or no effect on Swedish firms' efficient use of energy during the first trading phase and the beginning of the second, indicating that the carbon permit price was too low to generate the necessary incentives for energy efficiency investments.

  • 6.
    Persson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Environmental policy and lobbying in small open economies2012In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, E-ISSN 1873-0221, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 24-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes consequences of lobby group activity for policy outcomes in economies with transboundary pollution and international environmental policies. International environmental policies are here characterized as pollution taxes determined in a negotiation between two countries. The optimal pollution taxes are characterized and comparative statics are carried out to increase the understanding of mechanisms underlying pollution taxes in the specified setup. It is found, among other things, that the presence of local lobbying may decrease, as well as increase pollution taxes – depending on, e.g. an assumption of symmetry.

    Highlights

    ► Environmental policy (taxes) is studied in the presence of environmental lobbying. ► Focus is on environmental policies determined in a negotiation between countries. ► National environmental lobbying may decrease, as well as increase pollution taxes.

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