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  • 1. Holme, Petter
    et al.
    Grönlund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Modelling the dynamics of youth subcultures2005In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 8, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the dynamics behind youth subcultures such as punk, hippie, or hip-hop cultures? How does the global dynamics of these subcultures relate to the individual's search for a personal identity? We propose a simple dynamical model to address these questions and find that only a few assumptions of the individual's behaviour are necessary to regenerate known features of youth culture.

  • 2. Mercuur, Rijk
    et al.
    Dignum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, 2628 BX Delft, The Netherlands.
    Jonker, Catholijn M.
    The Value of Values and Norms in Social Simulation2019In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social simulations gain strength when agent behaviour can (1) represent human behaviour and (2) be explained in understandable terms. Agents with values and norms lead to simulation results that meet human needs for explanations, but have not been tested on their ability to reproduce human behaviour. This paper compares empirical data on human behaviour to simulated data on agents with values and norms in a psychological experiment on dividing money: the ultimatum game. We find that our agent model with values and norms produces aggregate behaviour that falls within the 95% confidence interval wherein human behaviour lies more often than other tested agent models. A main insight is that values serve as a static component in agent behaviour, whereas norms serve as a dynamic component.

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