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  • 1.
    Beier, Frank
    et al.
    Institute Experimental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Lammi, Mikko
    Institute Experimental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Bertling, Wolf
    Institute for Genetics, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    von der Mark, Klaus
    Institute Experimental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Transcriptional regulation of the human type X collagen gene expression.1996In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 785, p. 209-211, article id 8702131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Andreén, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Birzniece, Vita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Björn, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Haage, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Isaksson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Johansson, Inga-Maj
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindblad, Charlott
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lundgren, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nyberg, Sigrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ödmark, Inga-Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Strömberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Turkmen, Sahruh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wahlström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wang, Mingde
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wihlbäck, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Zhu, Di
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Zingmark, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Pathogenesis in menstrual cycle-linked CNS disorders.2003In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1007, p. 42-53Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Grimsholm, Ola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Are neuropeptides important in arthritis? Studies on the importance of bombesin/GRP and substance P in a murine arthritis model.2007In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1110, p. 525-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interference with the effects of neuropeptides may be of potential therapeutic value for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two neuropeptides that can be discussed in this context are bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide (BN/GRP) and substance P (SP). In order to obtain new information on the possible importance of these two peptides, the patterns of immunohistochemical expression of BN/GRP and SP and their related receptors in the mouse knee joint from healthy and arthritic mice were examined. Positive staining for GRP receptor and the SP preferred receptor (the neurokinin-1 receptor [NK-1 R]) was observed in articular chondrocytes. On the whole, there was a decrease in immunoreactions for both the GRP- and the NK-1 receptors in the articular chondrocytes in joints exhibiting severe arthritis. Staining for BN/GRP and GRP receptor was seen in the inflammatory infiltrates of the arthritic joints. New evidence for the occurrence of marked effects of BN/GRP concerning both the articular chondrocytes and the inflammatory process is obtained in this study. With these findings and previous observations of neuropeptide expression patterns and functions we discuss the possibility that interventions with the effects of BN/GRP, SP, and other neuropeptides might be worthwhile in RA.

  • 4. Hanson, Lars A
    et al.
    Korotkova, Marina
    Lundin, Samuel
    Håversen, Liljana
    Silfverdal, Sven-Arne
    Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger
    Strandvik, Birgitta
    Telemo, Esbjörn
    The transfer of immunity from mother to child.2003In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 987, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newborn's immune system grows fast from a small size at birth by exposure primarily to the intestinal microflora normally obtained from the mother at and after birth. While building up its immune system, the infant is supported by the transplacental IgG antibodies, which also contain anti-idiotypic antibodies, possibly also actively priming the offspring. The second mode of transfer of immunity occurs via the milk. Numerous major protective components, including secretory IgA (SIgA) antibodies and lactoferrin, are present. The breastfed infant is better protected against numerous common infections than the non-breastfed. Breastfeeding also seems to actively stimulate the infant's immune system by anti-idiotypes, uptake of milk lymphocytes, cytokines, etc. Therefore, the breastfed child continues to be better protected against various infections for some years. Vaccine responses are also often enhanced in breastfed infants. Long-lasting protection against certain immunological diseases such as allergies and celiac disease is also noted.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Norrgård, Örjan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Are neurotrophins important in ulcerative colitis?2007In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1107, p. 290-299Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurotrophins are known to have growth, survival-promoting, and healing effects. The importance of neurotrophins in ulcerative colitis (UC) is, however, unclear. Recent studies in our group revealed that an occurrence of marked changes in neurotrophin expression patterns was related to a worsening of the disease process. There was thus an upregulation for the lamina propria cells but a downregulation in nerve structures concerning neurotrophin expressions in severe UC. The observations show that changes in the neurotrophin system are a part of the disease process in UC and are of interest as treatments interfering with neurotrophin effects in other situations have been found to have trophic and healing effects.

  • 6.
    Jönsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Norrgård, Orjan
    Hansson, Magnus
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Decrease in binding for the neuropeptide VIP in response to marked inflammation of the mucosa in ulcerative colitis2007In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1107, p. 280-289Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is involved in the neuroimmunomodulation of the intestine. In the present study, specimens from the sigmoid colon of ulcerative colitis (UC) and non-UC patients were examined for immunohistochemistry and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Marked occurrence of VIP binding was observed in the mucosa. However, there were very low levels of binding in areas showing pronounced inflammation/derangement. The study shows that marked derangement of the mucosa leads to a distinct decrease in VIP binding. Thus, it is possible that a decrease in trophic and anti-inflammatory VIP effects occurs in areas exhibiting a very marked inflammation.

  • 7. Keim, Paul
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Wagner, David M
    Molecular epidemiology, evolution, and ecology of Francisella.2007In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1105, p. 30-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tularemia is a disease caused by several subspecies of Francisella tularensis, although the severity of the disease varies greatly from subspecies to subspecies. Currently, there are four recognized subspecies (tularensis, holarctica, mediasiatica, and novicida), in addition to a second Francisella species, F. philomiragia. It is clear from molecular sampling of the environment that these human pathogens are a mere fraction of the Francisella diversity. Taxonomic nomenclature is now being based upon several DNA-sequence-based approaches and this advance provides for robust phylogenetic models that are guiding the systematics of this genus. This in turn allows for better molecular epidemiological investigations and more precise ecological analysis. Tularemia ecology is still only partially understood, with many knowledge gaps about the disease reservoir and vectors. Molecular analysis has identified a major population split within F. tularensis subsp. tularensis that points toward distinctive ecological adaptations, vectors, and host species. Current medical practice does not rely upon subspecies or subpopulation identification, although this information may have predictive value for clinical outcome, especially in the United States. Combined molecular and epidemiological analyses suggest that the population split in F. tularensis subsp. tularensis matches two distinct human diseases in the United States with different mortality rates. DNA-sequence-based typing of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica from tularemia outbreaks in Europe and the United States proves regional identity among isolates and also demonstrates that this subspecies successfully disseminated worldwide in recent evolutionary time.

  • 8. Olsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Strigård, Karin
    Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Klareskog, Lars
    Effects on experimental allergic neuritis in rats by in vivo treatment with monoclonal anti-T-cell antibodies.1988In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 540, p. 560-562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Sanjeevi, C B
    et al.
    Landin-Olsson, M
    Kockum, I
    Dahlquist, Gisela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Lernmark, A
    The combination of several polymorphic amino acid residues in the DQalpha and DQbeta chains forms a domain structure pattern and is associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 958, p. 362-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IDDM is positively associated with HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8) and DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (DQ2) and negatively associated with DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 (DQ6). The aim of the present study was to analyze the importance of several polymorphic residues and domains of DQalpha and DQbeta, in addition to residue 52 DQalpha and residue 57 DQbeta, with regard to susceptibility or resistance in new-onset 0- to 15-year-old Swedish children with IDDM (n = 425) and matched controls (n = 367). HLA genotyping identified several polymorphic residues of the DQalpha and DQbeta to be either positively or negatively associated with IDDM, including Arg 52 DQalpha and Asp 57 DQbeta. Leu 69 DQalpha was positively (OR 7.02, P < 0.0001), Ala 69 DQalpha was negatively (OR 0.22, P < 0.0001), Gln 47 DQalpha was positively (OR 5.8, P < 0.0001), Cys 47 DQalpha was positively (OR 2.2, P < 0.0001), Lys 47 DQalpha was negatively (OR 0.47, P < 0.005), and Arg 47 DQalpha was negatively (OR 0.22, P < 0.005) associated with IDDM. Similarly, residues at 11, 18, 45, 48, 50, 53, 55, 61, 64, 66, 76, and 80 were either positively or negatively associated with IDDM. Likewise, for DQbeta, Leu 53 DQbeta was positively (OR 11.01, P < 0.0001), Gln 53 DQbeta was negatively (OR 0.22, P < 0.0005), Arg 70 DQbeta was positively (OR 11.01, P < 0.0001), and Gly 70 DQbeta was negatively (OR 0.19, P < 0.0001) associated like other residues at 71, 74, 84, 85, 86, 89, and 90 DQbeta with IDDM. Certain domains in the DQalpha, RFTIL (at DQalpha positions 52, 61, 64, 66, and 69), were present in 95% of patients compared to 69% of controls (OR 9.01, P(c) < 0.0001), and DQbeta domain GR (at DQbeta positions 45 and 70) was present in 95% of patients and 68% of controls (OR 8.68, P < 0.0001), which correlated better than the individual amino acid residues with IDDM. A combination of the DQalpha and DQbeta chain domains was present in 94% of patients compared to 60% of controls (OR 10.6, P < 0.001). In conclusion, domains in the DQalpha, DQbeta, or both in the DQ molecule explain susceptibility or resistance to IDDM better than individual amino acid residues of DQA1 and DQB1.

  • 10. Semenza, Jan C.
    et al.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Penttinen, Pasi
    Lindgren, Elisabet
    Observed and projected drivers of emerging infectious diseases in Europe2016In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1382, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging infectious diseases are of international concern because of the potential for, and impact of, pandemics; however, they are difficult to predict. To identify the drivers of disease emergence, we analyzed infectious disease threat events (IDTEs) detected through epidemic intelligence collected at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) between 2008 and 2013, and compared the observed results with a 2008 ECDC foresight study of projected drivers of future IDTEs in Europe. Among 10 categories of IDTEs, foodborne and waterborne IDTEs were the most common, vaccine-preventable IDTEs caused the highest number of cases, and airborne IDTEs caused the most deaths. Observed drivers for each IDTE were sorted into three main groups: globalization and environmental drivers contributed to 61% of all IDTEs, public health system drivers contributed to 21%, and social and demographic drivers to 18%. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that four of the top five drivers for observed IDTEs were in the globalization and environment group. In the observational study, the globalization and environment group was related to all IDTE categories, but only to five of eight categories in the foresight study. Directly targeting these drivers with public health interventions may diminish the chances of IDTE occurrence from the outset.

  • 11.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Tularemia: history, epidemiology, pathogen physiology, and clinical manifestations.2007In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1105, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis has been recognized as a human pathogen for almost 100 years and is the etiological agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia. Soon after its discovery, it became recognized as an important pathogen in several parts of the world, for example, in the United States and Soviet Union. The number of tularemia cases in the two countries peaked in the 1940s and has thereafter steadily declined. Despite this decline, there was still much interest in the pathogen in the 1950s and 1960s since it is highly infectious and transmissible by aerosol, rendering it a potent biothreat agent. In fact, it was one of the agents that was given the highest priority in the offensive programs of the United States and Soviet Union. After termination of the offensive programs in the 1960s, the interest in F. tularensis diminished significantly and little research was carried out for several decades. Outbreaks of tularemia during the last decade in Europe, for example, in Kosovo, Spain, and Scandinavia, led to a renewed public interest in the disease. This, together with a massive increase in the research funding, in particular in the United States since 2001, has resulted in a significant increase in the number of active Francisella researchers. This article summarizes, predominantly with a historical perspective, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of tularemia and the physiology of F. tularensis.

  • 12. Thornell, L E
    et al.
    Eriksson, A
    Johansson, B
    Kjörell, U
    Franke, W W
    Virtanen, I
    Lehto, V P
    Intermediate filament and associated proteins in heart Purkinje fibers: a membrane-myofibril anchored cytoskeletal system.1985In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 455, p. 213-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Ullén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mosing, Miriam A
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between motor timing, music practice, and intelligence studied in a large sample of twins2015In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1337, p. 125-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music performance depends critically on precise processing of time. A common model behavior in studies of motor timing is isochronous serial interval production (ISIP), that is, hand/finger movements with a regular beat. ISIP accuracy is related to both music practice and intelligence. Here we present a study of these associations in a large twin cohort, demonstrating that the effects of music practice and intelligence on motor timing are additive, with no significant multiplicative (interaction) effect. Furthermore, the association between music practice and motor timing was analyzed with the use of a co-twin control design using intrapair differences. These analyses revealed that the phenotypic association disappeared when all genetic and common environmental factors were controlled. This suggests that the observed association may not reflect a causal effect of music practice on ISIP performance but rather reflect common influences (e.g., genetic effects) on both outcomes. The relevance of these findings for models of practice and expert performance is discussed.

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