umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alonso, J. M.
    et al.
    Stepanova, A. N.
    Leisse, T. J.
    Kim, C. J.
    Chen, H. M.
    Shinn, P.
    Stevenson, D. K.
    Zimmerman, J.
    Barajas, P.
    Cheuk, R.
    Gadrinab, C.
    Heller, C.
    Jeske, A.
    Koesema, E.
    Meyers, C. C.
    Parker, H.
    Prednis, L.
    Ansari, Y.
    Choy, N.
    Deen, H.
    Geralt, M.
    Hazari, N.
    Hom, E.
    Karnes, M.
    Mulholland, C.
    Ndubaku, R.
    Schmidt, I.
    Guzman, P.
    Aguilar-Henonin, L.
    Schmid, M.
    Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Weigel, D.
    Carter, D. E.
    Marchand, T.
    Risseeuw, E.
    Brogden, D.
    Zeko, A.
    Crosby, W. L.
    Berry, C. C.
    Ecker, J. R.
    Genome-wide Insertional mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana2003In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 301, no 5633, p. 653-657Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aspholm-Hurtig, Marina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Dailide, Giedrius
    Lahmann, Martina
    Kalia, Awdhesh
    Ilver, Dag
    Roche, Niamh
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindén, Sara
    Bäckström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Lundberg, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Ulf J
    Velapatiño, Billie
    Gilman, Robert H
    Gerhard, Markus
    Alarcon, Teresa
    López-Brea, Manuel
    Nakazawa, Teruko
    Fox, James G
    Correa, Pelayo
    Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria
    Perez-Perez, Guillermo I
    Blaser, Martin J
    Normark, Staffan
    Carlstedt, Ingemar
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Teneberg, Susann
    Berg, Douglas E
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Functional adaptation of BabA, the H. pylori ABO blood group antigen binding adhesin.2004In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 305, no 5683, p. 519-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence by Helicobacter pylori increases the risk of gastric disease. Here, we report that more than 95% of strains that bind fucosylated blood group antigen bind A, B, and O antigens (generalists), whereas 60% of adherent South American Amerindian strains bind blood group O antigens best (specialists). This specialization coincides with the unique predominance of blood group O in these Amerindians. Strains differed about 1500-fold in binding affinities, and diversifying selection was evident in babA sequences. We propose that cycles of selection for increased and decreased bacterial adherence contribute to babA diversity and that these cycles have led to gradual replacement of generalist binding by specialist binding in blood group O-dominant human populations.

  • 3.
    Björk, Glenn R
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Wikström, P M
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Prevention of translational frameshifting by the modified nucleoside 1-methylguanosine1989In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 244, no 4907, p. 986-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methylated nucleoside 1-methylguanosine (m1G) is present next to the 3' end of the anticodon (position 37) in all transfer RNAs (tRNAs) that read codons starting with C except in those tRNAs that read CAN codons. All of the three proline tRNA species, which read CCN codons in Salmonella typhimurium, have been sequenced and shown to contain m1G in position 37. A mutant of S. typhimurium that lacks m1G in its tRNA when grown at temperatures above 37 degrees C, has now been isolated. The mutation (trmD3) responsible for this methylation deficiency is in the structural gene (trmD) for the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase. Therefore, the three proline tRNAs in the trmD3 mutant have an unmodified guanosine at position 37. Furthermore, the trmD3 mutation also causes at least one of the tRNAPro species to frequently shift frame when C's are present successively in the message. Thus, m1G appears to prevent frameshifting. The data from eubacteria apply to both eukaryotes and archaebacteria.

  • 4. Brigham-Grette, Julie
    et al.
    Melles, Martin
    Minyuk, Pavel
    Andreev, Andrei
    Tarasov, Pavel
    DeConto, Robert
    Koenig, Sebastian
    Nowaczyk, Norbert
    Wennrich, Volker
    Rosén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Haltia, Eeva
    Cook, Tim
    Gebhardt, Catalina
    Meyer-Jacob, Carsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Snyder, Jeff
    Herzschuh, Ulrike
    Pliocene warmth, polar amplification, and stepped pleistocene cooling recorded in NE arctic russia2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 340, no 6139, p. 1421-1427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the evolution of Arctic polar climate from the protracted warmth of the middle Pliocene into the earliest glacial cycles in the Northern Hemisphere has been hindered by the lack of continuous, highly resolved Arctic time series. Evidence from Lake El'gygytgyn, in northeast (NE) Arctic Russia, shows that 3.6 to 3.4 million years ago, summer temperatures were similar to 8 degrees C warmer than today, when the partial pressure of CO2 was similar to 400 parts per million. Multiproxy evidence suggests extreme warmth and polar amplification during the middle Pliocene, sudden stepped cooling events during the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition, and warmer than present Arctic summers until similar to 2.2 million years ago, after the onset of Northern Hemispheric glaciation. Our data are consistent with sea-level records and other proxies indicating that Arctic cooling was insufficient to support large-scale ice sheets until the early Pleistocene.

  • 5.
    Brodin, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Dilute concentrations of a psychiatric drug alter behavior of fish from natural populations2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6121, p. 814-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A variety of pharmaceuticals enter waterways by way of treated wastewater effluents and remain biochemically active in aquatic systems. Several ecotoxicological studies have been done, but generally, little is known about the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals. Here we show that a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) alters behavior and feeding rate of wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) at concentrations encountered in effluent-influenced surface waters. Individuals exposed to water with dilute drug concentrations (1.8 micrograms liter–1) exhibited increased activity, reduced sociality, and higher feeding rate. As such, our results show that anxiolytic drugs in surface waters alter animal behaviors that are known to have ecological and evolutionary consequences.

  • 6.
    Bäckman, Lars
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Soveri, Anna
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Turku PET Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Dahlin, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Neely, Anna S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Virta, Jere
    Turku PET Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Matti
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Rinne, Juha O
    Turku PET Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Effects of working-memory training on striatal dopamine release2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 333, no 6043, p. 718-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Updating of working memory has been associated with striato-frontal brain regions and phasic dopaminergic neurotransmission. We assessed raclopride binding to striatal dopamine (DA) D2 receptors during a letter-updating task and a control condition before and after 5 weeks of updating training. Results showed that updating affected DA activity before training and that training further increased striatal DA release during updating. These findings highlight the pivotal role of transient neural processes associated with D2 receptor activity in working memory.

  • 7.
    Dahlin, Erika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Stigsdotter-Neely, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, 11330 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Transfer of learning after updating training mediated by the striatum2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 320, no 5882, p. 1510-1512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process-specific training can improve performance on untrained tasks, but the magnitude of gain is variable and often there is no transfer at all. We demonstrate transfer to a 3-back test of working memory after 5 weeks of training in updating. The transfer effect was based on a joint training-related activity increase for the criterion (letter memory) and transfer tasks in a striatal region that also was recruited pretraining. No transfer was observed to a task that did not engage updating and striatal regions, and age-related striatal changes imposed constraints on transfer. These findings indicate that transfer can occur if the criterion and transfer tasks engage specific overlapping processing components and brain regions.

  • 8.
    Doudna, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Helmholtz Ctr Infect Res, Dept Regulat Infect Biol, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany; Hannover Med Sch, D-30625 Hannover, Germany.
    The new frontier of genome engineering with CRISPR-Cas92014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 346, no 6213, p. 1077-+Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of facile genome engineering using the bacterial RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system in animals and plants is transforming biology. We review the history of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat) biology from its initial discovery through the elucidation of the CRISPR-Cas9 enzyme mechanism, which has set the stage for remarkable developments using this technology to modify, regulate, or mark genomic loci in a wide variety of cells and organisms from all three domains of life. These results highlight a new era in which genomic manipulation is no longer a bottleneck to experiments, paving the way toward fundamental discoveries in biology, with applications in all branches of biotechnology, as well as strategies for human therapeutics.

  • 9.
    Dubbaka Venu, Pradeep Reddy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Liu, Lian
    Adhikari, Deepak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jagarlamudi, Krishna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rajareddy, Singareddy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yan
    Du, Chun
    Tang, Wenli
    Hämäläinen, Tuula
    Peng, Stanford L
    Lan, Zi-Jian
    Cooney, Austin J
    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Oocyte-specific deletion of Pten causes premature activation of the primordial follicle pool2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 319, no 5863, p. 611-613Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Elser, JJ
    et al.
    Andersen, T
    Baron, J
    Bergström, A-K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Jansson, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Kyle, M
    Nydick, KR
    Steger, L
    Hessen, DO
    Shifts in lake N:P stoichiometry and nutrient limitation driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 326, p. 835-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen (N) circulating in the biosphere. One major pathway of this anthropogenic N input into ecosystems has been increased regional deposition from the atmosphere. Here we show that atmospheric N deposition increased the stoichiometric ratio of N and phosphorus (P) in lakes in Norway, Sweden, and Colorado, United States, and, as a result, patterns of ecological nutrient limitation were shifted. Under low N deposition, phytoplankton growth is generally N-limited; however, in high–N deposition lakes, phytoplankton growth is consistently P-limited. Continued anthropogenic amplification of the global N cycle will further alter ecological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, trophic dynamics, and biological diversity, in the world’s lakes, even in lakes far from direct human disturbance.

  • 11. Estes, James A.
    et al.
    Terborgh, John
    Brashares, Justin S.
    Power, Mary E.
    Berger, Joel
    Bond, William J.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Essington, Timothy E.
    Holt, Robert D.
    Jackson, Jeremy B. C.
    Marquis, Robert J.
    Oksanen, Lauri
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Oksanen, Tarja
    Paine, Robert T.
    Pikitch, Ellen K.
    Ripple, William J.
    Sandin, Stuart A.
    Scheffer, Marten
    Schoener, Thomas W.
    Shurin, Jonathan B.
    Sinclair, Anthony R. E.
    Soule, Michael E.
    Virtanen, Risto
    Wardle, David A.
    Trophic Downgrading of Planet Earth2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 333, no 6040, p. 301-306Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently, large apex consumers were ubiquitous across the globe and had been for millions of years. The loss of these animals may be humankind's most pervasive influence on nature. Although such losses are widely viewed as an ethical and aesthetic problem, recent research reveals extensive cascading effects of their disappearance in marine, terrestrial, and freshwater ecosystems worldwide. This empirical work supports long-standing theory about the role of top-down forcing in ecosystems but also highlights the unanticipated impacts of trophic cascades on processes as diverse as the dynamics of disease, wildfire, carbon sequestration, invasive species, and biogeochemical cycles. These findings emphasize the urgent need for interdisciplinary research to forecast the effects of trophic downgrading on process, function, and resilience in global ecosystems.

  • 12.
    Franks, Paul W.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Exposing the exposures responsible for type 2 diabetes and obesity2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, no 6308, p. 69-73Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rising prevalences of type 2 diabetes and obesity constitutemajor threats to human health globally. Powerful social and economic factors influence the distribution of these diseases among and within populations. These factors act on a substrate of individual predisposition derived from the composite effects of inherited DNA variation and a range of environmental exposures experienced throughout the life course. Although "Western" lifestyle represents a convenient catch-all culprit for such exposures, effective treatment and prevention will be informed by characterization of the most critical, causal environmental factors. In this Review, we examine how burgeoning understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes and obesity can highlight nongenetic exposures that drive development of these conditions.

  • 13. Fuhrmann, Jakob
    et al.
    Schmidt, Andreas
    Spiess, Silvia
    Lehner, Anita
    Turgay, Kürsad
    Mechtler, Karl
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Clausen, Tim
    McsB is a protein arginine kinase that phosphorylates and inhibits the heat-shock regulator CtsR2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 324, no 5932, p. 1323-1327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All living organisms face a variety of environmental stresses that cause the misfolding and aggregation of proteins. To eliminate damaged proteins, cells developed highly efficient stress response and protein quality control systems. We performed a biochemical and structural analysis of the bacterial CtsR/McsB stress response. The crystal structure of the CtsR repressor, in complex with DNA, pinpointed key residues important for high-affinity binding to the promoter regions of heat-shock genes. Moreover, biochemical characterization of McsB revealed that McsB specifically phosphorylates arginine residues in the DNA binding domain of CtsR, thereby impairing its function as a repressor of stress response genes. Identification of the CtsR/McsB arginine phospho-switch expands the repertoire of possible protein modifications involved in prokaryotic and eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

  • 14. Ghssein, Ghassan
    et al.
    Brutesco, Catherine
    Ouerdane, Laurent
    Fojcik, Clementine
    Izaute, Amelie
    Wang, Shuanglong
    Hajjar, Christine
    Lobinski, Ryszard
    Lemaire, David
    Richaud, Pierre
    Voulhoux, Rome
    Espaillat, Akbar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Pignol, David
    Borezee-Durant, Elise
    Arnoux, Pascal
    Biosynthesis of a broad-spectrum nicotianamine-like metallophore in Staphylococcus aureus2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 352, no 6289, p. 1105-1109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal acquisition is a vital microbial process in metal-scarce environments, such as inside a host. Using metabolomic exploration, targeted mutagenesis, and biochemical analysis, we discovered an operon in Staphylococcus aureus that encodes the different functions required for the biosynthesis and trafficking of a broad-spectrum metallophore related to plant nicotianamine (here called staphylopine). The biosynthesis of staphylopine reveals the association of three enzyme activities: a histidine racemase, an enzyme distantly related to nicotianamine synthase, and a staphylopine dehydrogenase belonging to the DUF2338 family. Staphylopine is involved in nickel, cobalt, zinc, copper, and iron acquisition, depending on the growth conditions. This biosynthetic pathway is conserved across other pathogens, thus underscoring the importance of this metal acquisition strategy in infection.

  • 15.
    Grabbe, Caroline
    et al.
    Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Dikic, Ivan
    Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Cell biology: going global on ubiquitin2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 322, no 5903, p. 872-873Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Hepburn, Lucy
    et al.
    Prajsnar, Tomasz K
    Klapholz, Catherine
    Moreno, Pablo
    Loynes, Catherine A
    Ogryzko, Nikolay V
    Brown, Karen
    Schiebler, Mark
    Hegyi, Krisztina
    Antrobus, Robin
    Hammond, Katherine L
    Connolly, John
    Ochoa, Bernardo
    Bryant, Clare
    Otto, Michael
    Surewaard, Bas
    Seneviratne, Suranjith L
    Grogono, Dorothy M
    Cachat, Julien
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kaser, Arthur
    Török, M Estée
    Peacock, Sharon J
    Holden, Matthew
    Blundell, Tom
    Wang, Lihui
    Ligoxygakis, Petros
    Minichiello, Liliana
    Woods, C Geoff
    Foster, Simon J
    Renshaw, Stephen A
    Floto, R Andres
    A Spaetzle-like role for nerve growth factor beta in vertebrate immunity to Staphylococcus aureus2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 346, no 6209, p. 641-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many key components of innate immunity to infection are shared between Drosophila and humans. However, the fly Toll ligand Spaetzle is not thought to have a vertebrate equivalent. We have found that the structurally related cystine-knot protein, nerve growth factor β (NGFβ), plays an unexpected Spaetzle-like role in immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in chordates. Deleterious mutations of either human NGFβ or its high-affinity receptor tropomyosin-related kinase receptor A (TRKA) were associated with severe S. aureus infections. NGFβ was released by macrophages in response to S. aureus exoproteins through activation of the NOD-like receptors NLRP3 and NLRP4 and enhanced phagocytosis and superoxide-dependent killing, stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production, and promoted calcium-dependent neutrophil recruitment. TrkA knockdown in zebrafish increased susceptibility to S. aureus infection, confirming an evolutionarily conserved role for NGFβ-TRKA signaling in pathogen-specific host immunity.

  • 17. Ilver, D
    et al.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Ogren, J
    Frick, I M
    Kersulyte, D
    Incecik, E T
    Berg, D E
    Covacci, A
    Engstrand, L
    Borén, Thomas
    Helicobacter pylori adhesin binding fucosylated histo-blood group antigens revealed by retagging.1998In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 279, no 5349, p. 373-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for peptic ulcer disease. Bacterial adherence to the human gastric epithelial lining is mediated by the fucosylated Lewis b (Leb) histo-blood group antigen. The Leb-binding adhesin, BabA, was purified by receptor activity-directed affinity tagging. The bacterial Leb-binding phenotype was associated with the presence of the cag pathogenicity island among clinical isolates of H. pylori. A vaccine strategy based on the BabA adhesin might serve as a means to target the virulent type I strains of H. pylori.

  • 18. Jinek, Martin
    et al.
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Fonfara, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hauer, Michael
    Doudna, Jennifer A
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    A programmable dual-RNA-guided DNA endonuclease in adaptive bacterial immunity2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 337, no 6096, p. 816-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids by using CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to guide the silencing of invading nucleic acids. We show here that in a subset of these systems, the mature crRNA that is base-paired to trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) forms a two-RNA structure that directs the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 to introduce double-stranded (ds) breaks in target DNA. At sites complementary to the crRNA-guide sequence, the Cas9 HNH nuclease domain cleaves the complementary strand, whereas the Cas9 RuvC-like domain cleaves the noncomplementary strand. The dual-tracrRNA:crRNA, when engineered as a single RNA chimera, also directs sequence-specific Cas9 dsDNA cleavage. Our study reveals a family of endonucleases that use dual-RNAs for site-specific DNA cleavage and highlights the potential to exploit the system for RNA-programmable genome editing.

  • 19. Jinek, Martin
    et al.
    Jiang, Fuguo
    Taylor, David W.
    Sternberg, Samuel H.
    Kaya, Emine
    Ma, Enbo
    Anders, Carolin
    Hauer, Michael
    Zhou, Kaihong
    Lin, Steven
    Kaplan, Matias
    Iavarone, Anthony T.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Nogales, Eva
    Doudna, Jennifer A.
    Structures of Cas9 Endonucleases Reveal RNA-Mediated Conformational Activation2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 343, no 6176, p. 1215-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems use an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to generate double-strand breaks in invasive DNA during an adaptive bacterial immune response. Cas9 has been harnessed as a powerful tool for genome editing and gene regulation in many eukaryotic organisms. We report 2.6 and 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structures of two major Cas9 enzyme subtypes, revealing the structural core shared by all Cas9 family members. The architectures of Cas9 enzymes define nucleic acid binding clefts, and single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions show that the two structural lobes harboring these clefts undergo guide RNA-induced reorientation to form a central channel where DNA substrates are bound. The observation that extensive structural rearrangements occur before target DNA duplex binding implicates guide RNA loading as a key step in Cas9 activation.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Battling the bureaucracy hydra2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 351, no 6272, p. 530-530Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Joint, Ian
    et al.
    Tait, Karen
    Callow, Maureen E.
    Callow, James A.
    Milton, Debra L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Williams, Paul
    Cámara, Miguel
    Cell-to-cell communication across the prokaryote-eukaryote boundary2002In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 298, no 5596, p. 1207-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Kern, Jan
    et al.
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Glöckner, Carina
    Hellmich, Julia
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Koroidov, Sergey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lampe, Alyssa
    Han, Guangye
    Gul, Sheraz
    Difiore, Dörte
    Milathianaki, Despina
    Fry, Alan R.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Koglin, Jason E.
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Latimer, Matthew J.
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    White, William E.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Adams, Paul D.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sébastien
    Messinger, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Zouni, Athina
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yano, Junko
    Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 340, no 6131, p. 491-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  • 23.
    Lam, Hubert
    et al.
    Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
    Oh, Dong-Chan
    Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
    Cava, Felipe
    Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
    Takacs, Constantin N
    Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
    Clardy, Jon
    Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
    de Pedro, Miguel A
    CBM ‘Severo Ochoa’ CSIC-UAM, Madrid, Spain.
    Waldor, Matthew K
    Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
    D-amino acids govern stationary phase cell wall remodeling in bacteria2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 325, no 5947, p. 1552-1555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all known organisms, amino acids are predominantly thought to be synthesized and used as their L-enantiomers. Here, we found that bacteria produce diverse D-amino acids as well, which accumulate at millimolar concentrations in supernatants of stationary phase cultures. In Vibrio cholerae, a dedicated racemase produced D-Met and D-Leu, whereas Bacillus subtilis generated D-Tyr and D-Phe. These unusual D-amino acids appear to modulate synthesis of peptidoglycan, a strong and elastic polymer that serves as the stress-bearing component of the bacterial cell wall. D-Amino acids influenced peptidoglycan composition, amount, and strength, both by means of their incorporation into the polymer and by regulating enzymes that synthesize and modify it. Thus, synthesis of D-amino acids may be a common strategy for bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions.

  • 24. Lee, Jeong Hwan
    et al.
    Ryu, Hak-Seung
    Chung, Kyung Sook
    Pose, David
    Kim, Soonkap
    Schmid, Markus
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Spemannstrasse 35, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Ahn, Ji Hoon
    Regulation of Temperature-Responsive Flowering by MADS-Box Transcription Factor Repressors2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 342, no 6158, p. 628-632Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Lind, Peter A
    et al.
    Berg, Otto G
    Andersson, Dan I
    Mutational robustness of ribosomal protein genes.2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 330, no 6005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of mutations is of fundamental importance for understanding evolutionary dynamics and complex diseases and for conserving threatened species. DFEs estimated from DNA sequences have rarely been subject to direct experimental tests. We used a bacterial system in which the fitness effects of a large number of defined single mutations in two ribosomal proteins were measured with high sensitivity. The obtained DFE appears to be unimodal, where most mutations (120 out of 126) are weakly deleterious and the remaining ones are potentially neutral. The DFEs for synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions are similar, suggesting that in some genes, strong fitness constraints are present at the level of the messenger RNA.

  • 26.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Sondén, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Hurtig, Marina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Olfat, Farzad O
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Forsberg, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Roche, Niamh
    Ångström, Jonas
    Larsson, Thomas
    Teneberg, Susann
    Karlsson, Karl-Anders
    Altraja, Siiri
    Wadström, Torkel
    Kersulyte, Dangeruta
    Berg, Douglas E
    Dubois, Andre
    Petersson, Christoffer
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Norberg, Thomas
    Lindh, Frank
    Lundskog, Bertil B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology.
    Hammarström, Lennart
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Helicobacter pylori SabA adhesin in persistent infection and chronic inflammation2002In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 297, no 5581, p. 573-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori adherence in the human gastric mucosa involves specific bacterial adhesins and cognate host receptors. Here, we identify sialyl-dimeric-Lewis x glycosphingolipid as a receptor for H. pylori and show that H. pylori infection induced formation of sialyl-Lewis x antigens in gastric epithelium in humans and in a Rhesus monkey. The corresponding sialic acid-binding adhesin (SabA) was isolated with the "retagging" method, and the underlying sabA gene (JHP662/HP0725) was identified. The ability of many H. pylori strains to adhere to sialylated glycoconjugates expressed during chronic inflammation might thus contribute to virulence and the extraordinary chronicity of H. pylori infection.

  • 27. Melles, Martin
    et al.
    Brigham-Grette, Julie
    Minyuk, Pavel S
    Nowaczyk, Norbert R
    Wennrich, Volker
    DeConto, Robert M
    Anderson, Patricia M
    Andreev, Andrei A
    Coletti, Anthony
    Cook, Timothy L
    Haltia-Hovi, Eeva
    Kukkonen, Maaret
    Lozhkin, Anatoli V
    Rosen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Tarasov, Pavel
    Vogel, Hendrik
    Wagner, Bernd
    2.8 million years of arctic climate change from Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 337, no 6092, p. 315-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reliability of Arctic climate predictions is currently hampered by insufficient knowledge of natural climate variability in the past. A sediment core from Lake El'gygytgyn in northeastern (NE) Russia provides a continuous, high-resolution record from the Arctic, spanning the past 2.8 million years. This core reveals numerous "super interglacials" during the Quaternary; for marine benthic isotope stages (MIS) 11c and 31, maximum summer temperatures and annual precipitation values are similar to 4 degrees to 5 degrees C and similar to 300 millimeters higher than those of MIS 1 and 5e. Climate simulations show that these extreme warm conditions are difficult to explain with greenhouse gas and astronomical forcing alone, implying the importance of amplifying feedbacks and far field influences. The timing of Arctic warming relative to West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreats implies strong interhemispheric climate connectivity.

  • 28.
    Metcalfe, Daniel B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Microbial change in warming soils2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 358, no 6359, p. 41-42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Nilsson, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Reidy, Catherine A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Revenga, Carmen
    Fragmentation and flow regulation of the world's large river systems2005In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 308, no 5720, p. 405-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A global overview of dam-based impacts on large river systemsshows that over half (172 out of 292) are affected by dams,including the eight most biogeographically diverse. Dam-impactedcatchments experience higher irrigation pressure and about 25times more economic activity per unit of water than do unaffectedcatchments. In view of projected changes in climate and waterresource use, these findings can be used to identify ecologicalrisks associated with further impacts on large river systems.

  • 30.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Figuring out how I belong2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 359, no 6383, p. 1558-1558Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Pecl, Gretta T.
    et al.
    Araujo, Miguel B.
    Bell, Johann D.
    Blanchard, Julia
    Bonebrake, Timothy C.
    Chen, I-Ching
    Clark, Timothy D.
    Colwell, Robert K.
    Danielsen, Finn
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Falconi, Lorena
    Ferrier, Simon
    Frusher, Stewart
    Garcia, Raquel A.
    Griffis, Roger B.
    Hobday, Alistair J.
    Janion-Scheepers, Charlene
    Jarzyna, Marta A.
    Jennings, Sarah
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Linnetved, Hlif I.
    Martin, Victoria Y.
    McCormack, Phillipa C.
    McDonald, Jan
    Mitchell, Nicola J.
    Mustonen, Tero
    Pandolfi, John M.
    Pettorelli, Nathalie
    Popova, Ekaterina
    Robinson, Sharon A.
    Scheffers, Brett R.
    Shaw, Justine D.
    Sorte, Cascade J. B.
    Strugnell, Jan M.
    Sunday, Jennifer M.
    Tuanmu, Mao-Ning
    Verges, Adriana
    Villanueva, Cecilia
    Wernberg, Thomas
    Wapstra, Erik
    Williams, Stephen E.
    Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 355, no 6332, article id eaai9214Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributions of Earth's species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation of natural systems, how and why does this matter? We review evidence that climate-driven species redistribution at regional to global scales affects ecosystem functioning, human well-being, and the dynamics of climate change itself. Production of natural resources required for food security, patterns of disease transmission, and processes of carbon sequestration are all altered by changes in species distribution. Consideration of these effects of biodiversity redistribution is critical yet lacking in most mitigation and adaptation strategies, including the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals.

  • 32. Pizzorusso, Tommaso
    et al.
    Medini, Paolo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Berardi, Nicoletta
    Chierzi, Sabrina
    Fawcett, James W
    Maffei, Lamberto
    Reactivation of ocular dominance plasticity in the adult visual cortex2002In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 298, no 5596, p. 1248-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In young animals, monocular deprivation leads to an ocular dominance shift, whereas in adults after the critical period there is no such shift. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) inhibitory for axonal sprouting. We tested whether the developmental maturation of the ECM is inhibitory for experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. The organization of CSPGs into perineuronal nets coincided with the end of the critical period and was delayed by dark rearing. After CSPG degradation with chondroitinase-ABC in adult rats, monocular deprivation caused an ocular dominance shift toward the nondeprived eye. The mature ECM is thus inhibitory for experience-dependent plasticity, and degradation of CSPGs reactivates cortical plasticity.

  • 33.
    Seekell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT: Passing the point of no return2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, no 6316, p. 1109-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Smith, Felisa A
    et al.
    Boyer, Alison G
    Brown, James H
    Costa, Daniel P
    Dayan, Tamar
    Ernest, SK Morgan
    Evans, Alistair R
    Fortelius, Mikael
    Gittleman, John L
    Hamilton, Marcus J
    Harding, Larisa E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lintulaakso, Kari
    Lyons, S Kathleen
    McCain, Christy
    Okie, Jordan G
    Saarinen, Juha J
    Sibly, Richard M
    Stephens, Patrick R
    Theodor, Jessica
    Uhen, Mark D
    The evolution of maximum body size of terrestrial mammals2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 330, no 6008, p. 1216-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extinction of dinosaurs at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary was the seminal event that opened the door for the subsequent diversification of terrestrial mammals. Our compilation of maximum body size at the ordinal level by sub-epoch shows a near-exponential increase after the K/Pg. On each continent, the maximum size of mammals leveled off after 40 million years ago and thereafter remained approximately constant. There was remarkable congruence in the rate, trajectory, and upper limit across continents, orders, and trophic guilds, despite differences in geological and climatic history, turnover of lineages, and ecological variation. Our analysis suggests that although the primary driver for the evolution of giant mammals was diversification to fill ecological niches, environmental temperature and land area may have ultimately constrained the maximum size achieved.

  • 35. Soldatov, Alexander V.
    et al.
    Roth, Georg
    Dzyabchenko, Alexander
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Lebedkin, Sergei
    Meingast, Christoph
    Sundqvist, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Physics.
    Haluska, Miro
    Kuzmany, Hans
    Topochemical polymerization of C70 controlled by monomer crystal packing2001In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 293, no 5530, p. 680-683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymeric forms of C60 are now well known, but numerous attempts to obtain C70 in a polymeric state have yielded only dimers. Polymeric C70 has now been synthesized by treatment of hexagonally packed C70 single crystals under moderate hydrostatic pressure (2 gigapascals) at elevated temperature (300°C), which confirms predictions from our modeling of polymeric structures of C70. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction shows that the molecules are bridged into polymeric zigzag chains that extend along the c axis of the parent structure. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman data provide evidence for covalent chemical bonding between the C70 cages.

  • 36. Treusch, Sebastian
    et al.
    Hamamichi, Shusei
    Goodman, Jessica L
    Matlack, Kent ES
    Chung, Chee Yeun
    Baru, Valeriya
    Shulman, Joshua M
    Parrado, Antonio
    Bevis, Brooke J
    Valastyan, Julie S
    Han, Haesun
    Lindhagen-Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Reiman, Eric M
    Evans, Denis A
    Bennett, David A
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Dejager, Philip L
    Tanzi, Rudolph E
    Caldwell, Kim A
    Caldwell, Guy A
    Lindquist, Susan
    Functional links between Aβ toxicity, endocytic trafficking, and Alzheimer's disease risk factors in yeast2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 334, no 6060, p. 1241-1245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aβ (beta amyloid peptide) is an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We modeled Aβ toxicity in yeast by directing the peptide to the secretory pathway. A genome-wide screen for toxicity modifiers identified the yeast homolog of phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) and other endocytic factors connected to AD whose relationship to Aβ was previously unknown. The factors identified in yeast modified Aβ toxicity in glutamatergic neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans and in primary rat cortical neurons. In yeast, Aβ impaired the endocytic trafficking of a plasma membrane receptor, which was ameliorated by endocytic pathway factors identified in the yeast screen. Thus, links between Aβ, endocytosis, and human AD risk factors can be ascertained using yeast as a model system.

  • 37. Tylewicz, S.
    et al.
    Petterle, A.
    Marttila, S.
    Miskolczi, P.
    Azeez, A.
    Singh, R. K.
    Immanen, J.
    Mähler, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hvidsten, Torgerir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Eklund, D. M.
    Bowman, J. L.
    Helariutta, Y.
    Bhalerao, R. P.
    Photoperiodic control of seasonal growth is mediated by ABA acting on cell-cell communication2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 360, no 6385, p. 212-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In temperate and boreal ecosystems, seasonal cycles of growth and dormancy allow perennial plants to adapt to winter conditions. We show, in hybrid aspen trees, that photoperiodic regulation of dormancy is mechanistically distinct from autumnal growth cessation. Dormancy sets in when symplastic intercellular communication through plasmodesmata is blocked by a process dependent on the phytohormone abscisic acid. The communication blockage prevents growth-promoting signals from accessing the meristem. Thus, precocious growth is disallowed during dormancy. The dormant period, which supports robust survival of the aspen tree in winter, is due to loss of access to growth-promoting signals.

  • 38. Wahl, Vanessa
    et al.
    Ponnu, Jathish
    Schlereth, Armin
    Arrivault, Stephanie
    Langenecker, Tobias
    Franke, Annika
    Feil, Regina
    Lunn, John E.
    Stitt, Mark
    Schmid, Markus
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Spemannstrasse 35, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Regulation of Flowering by Trehalose-6-Phosphate Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6120, p. 704-707Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Wang, He
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Avican, Kemal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nuss, Aaron M.
    Dersch, Petra
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Increased plasmid copy number is essential for Yersinia T3SS function and virulence2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 353, no 6298, p. 492-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved numerous virulence mechanisms that are essential for establishing infections. The enterobacterium Yersinia uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by a 70-kilobase, low-copy, IncFII-class virulence plasmid. We report a novel virulence strategy in Y. pseudotuberculosis in which this pathogen up-regulates the plasmid copy number during infection. We found that an increased dose of plasmid-encoded genes is indispensable for virulence and substantially elevates the expression and function of the T3SS. Remarkably, we observed direct, tight coupling between plasmid replication and T3SS function. This regulatory pathway provides a framework for further exploration of the environmental sensing mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria.

  • 40. Werren, John H
    et al.
    Richards, Stephen
    Desjardins, Christopher A
    Niehuis, Oliver
    Gadau, Jürgen
    Colbourne, John K
    Beukeboom, Leo W
    Desplan, Claude
    Elsik, Christine G
    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P
    Kitts, Paul
    Lynch, Jeremy A
    Murphy, Terence
    Oliveira, Deodoro C S G
    Smith, Christopher D
    van de Zande, Louis
    Worley, Kim C
    Zdobnov, Evgeny M
    Aerts, Maarten
    Albert, Stefan
    Anaya, Victor H
    Anzola, Juan M
    Barchuk, Angel R
    Behura, Susanta K
    Bera, Agata N
    Berenbaum, May R
    Bertossa, Rinaldo C
    Bitondi, Márcia M G
    Bordenstein, Seth R
    Bork, Peer
    Bornberg-Bauer, Erich
    Brunain, Marleen
    Cazzamali, Giuseppe
    Chaboub, Lesley
    Chacko, Joseph
    Chavez, Dean
    Childers, Christopher P
    Choi, Jeong-Hyeon
    Clark, Michael E
    Claudianos, Charles
    Clinton, Rochelle A
    Cree, Andrew G
    Cristino, Alexandre S
    Dang, Phat M
    Darby, Alistair C
    de Graaf, Dirk C
    Devreese, Bart
    Dinh, Huyen H
    Edwards, Rachel
    Elango, Navin
    Elhaik, Eran
    Ermolaeva, Olga
    Evans, Jay D
    Foret, Sylvain
    Fowler, Gerald R
    Gerlach, Daniel
    Gibson, Joshua D
    Gilbert, Donald G
    Graur, Dan
    Gründer, Stefan
    Hagen, Darren E
    Han, Yi
    Hauser, Frank
    Hultmark, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hunter, Henry C
    Hurst, Gregory D D
    Jhangian, Shalini N
    Jiang, Huaiyang
    Johnson, Reed M
    Jones, Andrew K
    Junier, Thomas
    Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko
    Kamping, Albert
    Kapustin, Yuri
    Kechavarzi, Bobak
    Kim, Jaebum
    Kim, Jay
    Kiryutin, Boris
    Koevoets, Tosca
    Kovar, Christie L
    Kriventseva, Evgenia V
    Kucharski, Robert
    Lee, Heewook
    Lee, Sandra L
    Lees, Kristin
    Lewis, Lora R
    Loehlin, David W
    Logsdon, John M
    Lopez, Jacqueline A
    Lozado, Ryan J
    Maglott, Donna
    Maleszka, Ryszard
    Mayampurath, Anoop
    Mazur, Danielle J
    McClure, Marcella A
    Moore, Andrew D
    Morgan, Margaret B
    Muller, Jean
    Munoz-Torres, Monica C
    Muzny, Donna M
    Nazareth, Lynne V
    Neupert, Susanne
    Nguyen, Ngoc B
    Nunes, Francis M F
    Oakeshott, John G
    Okwuonu, Geoffrey O
    Pannebakker, Bart A
    Pejaver, Vikas R
    Peng, Zuogang
    Pratt, Stephen C
    Predel, Reinhard
    Pu, Ling-Ling
    Ranson, Hilary
    Raychoudhury, Rhitoban
    Rechtsteiner, Andreas
    Reese, Justin T
    Reid, Jeffrey G
    Riddle, Megan
    Robertson, Hugh M
    Romero-Severson, Jeanne
    Rosenberg, Miriam
    Sackton, Timothy B
    Sattelle, David B
    Schlüns, Helge
    Schmitt, Thomas
    Schneider, Martina
    Schüler, Andreas
    Schurko, Andrew M
    Shuker, David M
    Simões, Zilá L P
    Sinha, Saurabh
    Smith, Zachary
    Solovyev, Victor
    Souvorov, Alexandre
    Springauf, Andreas
    Stafflinger, Elisabeth
    Stage, Deborah E
    Stanke, Mario
    Tanaka, Yoshiaki
    Telschow, Arndt
    Trent, Carol
    Vattathil, Selina
    Verhulst, Eveline C
    Viljakainen, Lumi
    Wanner, Kevin W
    Waterhouse, Robert M
    Whitfield, James B
    Wilkes, Timothy E
    Williamson, Michael
    Willis, Judith H
    Wolschin, Florian
    Wyder, Stefan
    Yamada, Takuji
    Yi, Soojin V
    Zecher, Courtney N
    Zhang, Lan
    Gibbs, Richard A
    Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species.2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, ISSN 1095-9203 EISSN, Vol. 327, no 5963, p. 343-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging genetic model, particularly for evolutionary and developmental genetics. Key findings include the identification of a functional DNA methylation tool kit; hymenopteran-specific genes including diverse venoms; lateral gene transfers among Pox viruses, Wolbachia, and Nasonia; and the rapid evolution of genes involved in nuclear-mitochondrial interactions that are implicated in speciation. Newly developed genome resources advance Nasonia for genetic research, accelerate mapping and cloning of quantitative trait loci, and will ultimately provide tools and knowledge for further increasing the utility of parasitoids as pest insect-control agents.

  • 41. Wigge, P. A.
    et al.
    Kim, M. C.
    Jaeger, K. E.
    Busch, W.
    Schmid, M.
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Lohmann, J. U.
    Weigel, D.
    Integration of spatial and temporal information during floral induction in Arabidopsis2005In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 309, no 5737, p. 1056-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Woodward, Guy
    et al.
    Gessner, Mark O.
    Giller, Paul S.
    Gulis, Vladislav
    Hladyz, Sally
    Lecerf, Antoine
    Malmqvist, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    McKie, Brendan G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Tiegs, Scott D.
    Cariss, Helen
    Dobson, Mike
    Elosegi, Arturo
    Ferreira, Veronica
    Graca, Manuel A. S.
    Fleituch, Tadeusz
    Lacoursiere, Jean O.
    Nistorescu, Marius
    Pozo, Jesus
    Risnoveanu, Geta
    Schindler, Markus
    Vadineanu, Angheluta
    Vought, Lena B. -M.
    Chauvet, Eric
    Continental-Scale Effects of Nutrient Pollution on Stream Ecosystem Functioning2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 336, no 6087, p. 1438-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive nutrient loading is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide that leads to profound changes in aquatic biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. Systematic quantitative assessment of functional ecosystem measures for river networks is, however, lacking, especially at continental scales. Here, we narrow this gap by means of a pan-European field experiment on a fundamental ecosystem process-leaf-litter breakdown-in 100 streams across a greater than 1000-fold nutrient gradient. Dramatically slowed breakdown at both extremes of the gradient indicated strong nutrient limitation in unaffected systems, potential for strong stimulation in moderately altered systems, and inhibition in highly polluted streams. This large-scale response pattern emphasizes the need to complement established structural approaches (such as water chemistry, hydrogeomorphology, and biological diversity metrics) with functional measures (such as litter-breakdown rate, whole-system metabolism, and nutrient spiraling) for assessing ecosystem health.

1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf