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  • 1.
    Bohm, Ingela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lindblom, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Åbacka, Gun
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    'Don't give us an assignment where we have to use spinach!': food choice and discourse in home and consumer studies2016In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 57-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe classroom Discourses about vegetables during the planning, cooking, eating and evaluation of meals in the Swedish school subject Home and Consumer Studies. Fifty-nine students and five teachers were recruited from five northern Swedish villages and towns, and then observed, recorded and in some cases video-taped during lessons that took place between 2010 and 2012. Based on 56 instances of talk about vegetables, four Discourses were identified and related to the three aspects of Belasco's culinary triangle of contradictions: identity, responsibility and convenience. The results indicated that the identity-based sensory and cultural Discourses sometimes clashed with the more responsibility-oriented health and evaluation Discourses. The health Discourse was only used when there was an element of evaluation, with assignments connected to grades. In all other cases, the sensory and cultural Discourses guided vegetable use. Sometimes different sensory or cultural assumptions could clash with each other, for example when the teacher insisted on the use of a specific recipe regardless of a student's taste preferences. Since these preferences did not always harmonize with curricular demands for responsibility, there might be a risk of basing grades on aspects of students' identity. Alternatively, students might feel constrained to argue against their own identity in order to be favourably evaluated. Then again, if teachers always bow to student tastes, this limits their chances of learning about food and physical health. Viewing the dilemma through the lens of the culinary triangle of contradictions may help teachers and researchers develop teaching methods that take all aspects of food choice into account.

  • 2.
    Kinney, Dave
    et al.
    Independent Researcher, Edinburgh, UK.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Grocers’ window displays: the eclipse of a British tradition2013In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 467-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By reference to period retailing narratives, this paper examines the changed significance of shop window displays for British grocers with the transition from counter-based to self-service from the late 1940s to the 1960s. The ‘well-dressed’ window showing a selection of goods and price offers became an early casualty of changed retail practices. Opportunities presented by self-service for comprehensive stock displays and in-store promotion proved a decisive challenge to the art of the grocer's window display. These displays had been ubiquitous; large and small shops alike tried to impress passers-by with examples of their stock range. Self-service shops had different internal space requirements and soon it was more important that potential customers could see the well-stocked aisles and activity within.

  • 3.
    Lindblom, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Bohm, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    The importance of time frames in Swedish Home and Consumer Studies2016In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how time frames affect pupils and teachers in cooking activities during lessons of different durations for Home and Consumer Studies, with a specific focus on the pupils’ experiences. To investigate this, classroom observations were carried out in 2011 and 2012, with the help of audio and video recordings in three different schools in Sweden and included altogether 22 pupils (18 girls, 4 boys) in grade 9 (15–16 years). Each class was observed during two separate lessons, lasting between 1 h 50 minutes (110 minutes) and 2 h 20 minutes (140 minutes). The six lessons resulted in 12 hours of video recorded time and 80 hours of sound recordings.

    The study showed that the importance of finishing on time seemed to be ingrained in most pupils in all classes and the end result was perceived as more important than the process of cooking. The study also showed that knowledge of cooking skills and time management seemed important for success in grade-related tasks. Pupils demonstrated different ways of handling the time frames, e.g. using various methods to speed up the cooking process. This study raises important questions about the relationship between national and local time frames and the curriculum aims in Home and Consumer Studies. 

  • 4.
    Lindblom, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Practical conditions for home and consumer studies in Swedish compulsory education: a survey study2013In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 556-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to map the field of internal and external conditions that Swedish Home and Consumer Studies teachers and pupils have contend with. A questionnaire was constructed and delivered online in November 2010. It contained 27 question covering teacher qualification, quality of premises and equipment, lesson time and collaboration, and the use of national syllabi. A total of 385 persons across the country answered the questionnaire; about 21% of those teaching Home and Consumer Studies in Swedish compulsory school during the school year 2009–2010. These respondents taught in a total of 392 compulsory schools, which equalled about 22% of the schools teaching grades 7–9 in Sweden. Almost a quarter (23%) of the teachers lacked formal training for Home and Consumer Studies. Respondents without an appropriate degree qualification included those trained as nursery school teachers, dietitians and civil engineers. As regards classrooms, while 88% of respondents reported access to fully equipped kitchens with stoves, sinks and work surfaces, 5% used regular classrooms and the remainder were obliged to come up with alternative solutions, such as using portable kitchens in regular classrooms or conducting their lessons in the school restaurant. This study raises many questions about the quality of Home and Consumer Studies provision in a number of schools. The local deficiencies in the nationally decided frame factors for Home and Consumer Studies found by the present study gives us reason to doubt that all pupils achieve the overall learning goals of ‘knowing in practice’ and making informed choices utilizing environmental, economic and health perspectives. This might affect the health and economy of the individuals in the long run, with implications for the national economy and public health. On the basis of these findings, we therefore recommend that current conditions for Home and Consumer Studies and how the subject should operate in schools become a focus for national debate.

  • 5.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Editorial: special issue on older consumers2015In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 283-283Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    New approaches to consumer research2010In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 367-368Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    [Obituary] Robert Bayliss: an accidental home economist 16 July 1927-25 October 20172018In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 1p. 195-195Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Kinney, Dave
    Convenience and choice for consumers: the domestic acceptability of canned food between the 1870s and 1930s2013In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 130-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canned food once represented an astonishingly innovative technology although it is now largely ignored in food discourse. As with so much in our lives, familiarity renders an object invisible. To explore the changing social significance of canned food, as the format developed from scientific curiosity to domestic ubiquity, this paper examines reports in The Scotsman newspaper from the late 1870s to the 1930s. Although canned foods were slow to break into the mass market they were little short of revolutionary in the way they brought new tastes from across the world to ordinary British households. A few cans in the larder provided simple storage and reassurance that the unexpected visitor could be fed – perhaps with something a little out of the ordinary. Against this background of quiet assimilation into our food culture, canned food has been controversial and provided an unwitting rehearsal for contemporary food narratives. In these old newspapers, it was somewhat surprising to find reports of disquiet that are recognizable in our own times – the convenience of canned food posed a threat to culinary skills; questions were raised about the nutritional value and safety of processed food; we had become excessively reliant on imported food and disregarded our own produce.

  • 9.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janhonen-Abruquah, Hille
    Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Schröder, Monika
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Colquhoun, Anne
    University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee, Scotland.
    Continuity in the kitchen: how younger and older women compare in their food practices and use of cooking skills2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparisons between younger and older women in the kitchen usually focus on the historical argument that younger women do not have the domestic cooking skills of their mothers or grandmothers. At one level, this is convincing because there is now demonstrably greater reliance on ready meals and processed foods, and less on the home production of meals from raw ingredients. Compared with the immediate post-Second World War years, not so much time is routinely spent in the kitchen, and food preparation is no longer a task central to the lives of many women. The availability of meals or meal components requiring less domestic labour and improved kitchen technology are both factors in this transformation of women's lives. However, they are not just available to the young. So, this research questions the impact of these factors across the age spectrum. Older women may have had very different domestic experiences earlier in their lives but have they now converged with the practices of younger women? How do younger and older women compare in terms of their food practices and the cooking skills they currently use in the kitchen? Using Scottish questionnaire data from a cross-national study, this paper reports on the differences and similarities for 37 younger women (25–45 years; mean 32 years) and 43 older women (60–75 years; mean 68 years) in their actual use of specific food preparation and cooking techniques, the kind of meals they made, and the extent to which they ate out or ordered in meals for home consumption. Results indicated that while there were some differences in food preparation, the use of fresh ingredients and the style of cooking undertaken in the home, these were mostly marginal. There were similar response patterns for the adequacy of their domestic facilities and equipment. There was, however, a notable divergence in their patterns of eating meals out, or phoning out for meals. These data suggest that while younger and older women – different cooking generations – do differ, the way they differ is related more to current lifestyle factors than to any highly differentiated domestic food preparation and cooking skills.

  • 10.
    Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland UK.
    Ross, Liz
    Broadcasting cookery: BBC radio programmes in the 1920s and 1930s2016In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 327-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of British radio broadcasting technology in the 1920s and 1930s and,equally importantly, the progressively widespread purchase and use of radio setsestablished a new platform from which to engage and influence the population on anumber of matters. The British Broadcasting Corporation’s public service principles ofprogrammes to inform, educate and entertain gave rise to various content experiments ata time when there were very few precedents. One such innovation was the cookery talk.This was broadcast live, accomplished without the possibility of practical demonstration,and constituted a new, and abstract, form of communication primarily designed forwomen in their own homes. In this, women were the earliest and most frequentcontributors, and their broadcast content differed from that provided by men. Byreference to archive material, this article examines the social context and the thinkingbehind those early years of radio cookery talks and documents the contributors who wereto establish this now-familiar genre of broadcasting.

  • 11.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Nair, Gireesh
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden ; Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Energy advice service as perceived by Swedish homeowners2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    External actors can influence potential adopters to adopt energy efficiency measures. In Sweden municipality energy advisers are one such actor group who provides energy advice and information to the end users. The success of energy advice service for improvement of energy efficiency of detached houses depends on homeowners' perception towards it. In this context, we conducted a national survey of about 3000 owners of detached houses through stratified random sampling method in the summer of 2008. We found that majority of owners of detached houses consider energy advisers as an important source of information. Furthermore, many homeowners who contacted energy advisers for advice had implemented the suggestions. However, only a few homeowners had contacted an energy adviser. Our findings suggest that it is beneficial to continue the energy advice service, but more efforts are needed to increase homeowners' awareness of and satisfaction with such services.

  • 12.
    Marell, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Gärling, Tommy
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Laitila, Thomas
    Department of Statistics, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Need vs. opportunity recognition in household car replacements2009In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 639-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hypothesized that an intention to replace the owned car initiated by need recognition (a decrease in perceived current quality level of the old car) or opportunity recognition (an increase in aspired quality level of the new car) will result in purchases of different new cars. A sample of 1083 car owners were interviewed over telephone every fourth month during 2.5 years. The results showed that replacement intentions were not affected by how the intention was formed but that the choice of model year of the new car was. A younger car was chosen if the aspired quality level increased faster across interview waves than the current quality level decreased, and an older car was chosen if the current quality level decreased faster than the aspired quality level increased. As a consequence, if replacement intentions are the result of opportunity recognition, rejuvenation of the car fleet will be faster than if replacement intentions are the result of need recognition.

  • 13.
    Ross, Liz
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Cathcart, Craig
    School of Business, Enterprise and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Consumer choice for hearing aids and listening devices: newspaper advertisements for UK private sector provision2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 95-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the UK there can be several ways to access health care and this is true of hearing aid provision. Although there may appear to be a well-defined distinction between the National Health Service (NHS) and independent dispenser hearing aid provision, there have been many examples of overlap between the two and recent government policy initiatives mean that distinctions have become less clear. This article outlines the changing relationship between the two sectors and the problems that potential consumers face accessing information on private sector options for amplification devices. A 1-year sample of newspaper advertisements was content-analysed for clarity of information provided. The analysis highlighted a range of provision, from well-known hearing aid dispensers to the greyer areas of listening device retailers and intermediary services. Some advertisements were found to have been reported to the Advertising Standards Authority. Sufficiently misleading adverts may also infringe consumer protection legislation. The article concludes there is the possibility of consumer confusion about products and their potential for amelioration.

  • 14.
    Ryden, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Inst f Hushållsvetenskap, Uppsala Universitet.
    Hagfors, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Counting the cost of healthy eating: a Swedish comparison of Mediterranean-style and ordinary diets2008In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to examine the cost of a diet generally regarded as healthy, a Swedish version of the Mediterranean diet, and to compare it with the cost of an ordinary Swedish diet. A total of 30 individuals provided detailed dietary data collected in a randomized intervention study, examining the effect of dietary change to a Mediterranean-style diet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (Mediterranean group, n = 16, control group, n = 14). The data, covering 1-month dietary intake, were examined with three different diet quality indicators to see whether the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. All diet quality indicators showed that the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. Consumer food prices were used to analyse the cost of the different diets. In immediate consumer cost terms, eating a healthier diet was more expensive when differences in energy intake were discounted. However, non-energy adjusted costs showed no significant difference between the groups. Hence, if one of the reasons for choosing a healthier diet is to achieve weight loss – by consuming less energy – it is possible that healthier eating is not more expensive.

  • 15.
    Tieva, Åse
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Persson, Evelina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rhodin, Anders
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Pettersén, Sigrid
    Jonsäll, Anette
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Effect on energy and macronutrient intake with partial replacement of external food supply by in-house cooking at a nursing home for older people in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increased awareness of the importance of nutrition for older people's health and quality of life has underpinned projects and quality improvements for the meal situation in care establishments. The present study took place in a nursing home in a village outside an average-sized town situated in mid-Sweden. Care staff had initiated a change from external catered meals to purchase the food and cook the main meals themselves. The intention was to increase flexibility in accommodating the requests and needs of the elderly and, in doing so, to achieve increased professional pride and satisfaction. To ensure that no negative effects resulted for the residents in the nursing home, outcomes were evaluated through the present intervention study. The objective was to investigate whether and, if so, how their energy and nutrient intake and weight were affected. At the start, only one main hot meal was exchanged for home cooking to avoid work load problems as no increased costs were allowed and no extra staff were to be recruited. The study population consisted of 21 residents, aged 69-97 years. Weight, energy and nutrient intake were recorded before and during the intervention by 3-day food records validated by Goldberg's cutoff method. The same 3 days of the weekSunday to Tuesdayand the same menus were used for both measurement periods. At group level, the energy intake corresponded to the estimated energy requirements, both at baseline and at follow-up, although the intervention resulted in a significantly higher energy intake from the meals cooked in the ward kitchens. Two-thirds of the residents (n=13) slightly increased in weight from baseline to follow-up, while two participants (with body mass index 27.5 kg/m(2) and 33.5 kg/m(2), respectively) lost 5.0 kg and 6.9 kg, respectively. The total protein intake was insufficient both at baseline and follow-up and only met the participants' needs to 8122% and 83 +/- 26%, respectively. In conclusion, the intervention resulted in no adverse consequences for participants in terms of energy and nutrient intake. Most participants were weight stable or had small increases in weight, and the greatest weight gain was observed in the lighter clients. The low protein intake at both time points causes concern and suggests the need for further nutritional interventions to optimize older people's protein intake.

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