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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Srivastava, Manish
    Looking different vs thinking differently: Impact of TMT diversity on coopetition capability2018In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we focus on the micro-foundations of coopetition capability and ask: "where does coopetition capability come from?" Drawing upon social psychology and cognitive theories, we seek to offer insights into the micro-foundations of coopetition capability by focusing on the role of top management team (TMT) diversity. We suggest that TMT diversity emerges from two distinct attributes of the team members: surface-level (e.g., age, gender, nationality) and deep-level (e.g., knowledge and experience). We argue that TMT diversity based on surface-level attributes contributes negatively while TMT diversity based on deep-level attributes contributes positively to coopetition capability. We test our hypotheses using a novel dataset that combines primary data and employee level secondary data of a sample of 315 Swedish firms. Results provide broad support for our hypotheses. We discuss the implications of our findings and key limitations of our study.

  • 2.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier Business School / i3-CRG, Ecole Polytechnique, France.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Small and large firms’ trade-off between benefits and risks when choosing a coopetitor for innovation2019In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigates the extent to which small and large firms differ when assessing the benefits and risks provided by competitors as partners in innovation. Scholars have shown that coopetition can provide both significant benefits and risks for participating firms. The risks associated with firm competition and the trade-off firms make between the risks and benefits that can be obtained through coopetition must be considered when choosing a partnering firm. In addition, we argue that the firm size could affect the evaluation of benefits and the willingness to take risks such that small and large firms differ in their decision making. Therefore, we address the following questions: First, when choosing a coopetitor with which to innovate, to what extent do small and large firms differ in their evaluation of the benefits and risks associated to coopetition? Second, how does this evaluation influence firms’ willingness to coopete? We draw on research on coopetition to hypothesize that small and large firms differ in their evaluation of the six most important benefits of coopetition. To test our hypotheses, we rely on an experimental research design based on a choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis applied to a sample of innovative Swedish firms. Our results confirm that small and large firms value the benefits and risks associated with coopetitors differently. We show that small firms are less reluctant to coopete than large firms, especially if coopetition allows them to reduce their costs and learn from their coopetitor. In contrast, we show that large firms agree to coopete if coopetition enables them to reduce their time-to-market.

  • 3.
    Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Experiencing the paradox of coopetition: A moderated mediation framework explaining the paradoxical tension–performance relationship2018In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate how and why experienced paradoxical tension deteriorates coopetitive performance and when such debilitating effects can be managed. More specifically, by drawing on the paradox theory and emotion literature, I suggest that paradoxical tension (i.e., the cognitive difficulty faced by senior managers as they pursue multiple, simultaneous competing demands of coopetition) creates a state of emotional ambivalence, which in turn, contributes negatively to coopetitive performance. I further propose that the negative consequences can be managed through organizational-level mechanisms, namely, emotional capability and balancing capability. The results show a full mediation of emotional ambivalence and a positive influence of balancing capability. Surprisingly, the moderating effect of emotional capability turns out to be negative. However, interestingly, the moderated-mediation result shows that a blend of higher balancing capability and lower emotional capability produces a positive indirect effect of tension on performance. The paper contributes to the research on strategy and organizational paradoxes.

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