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  • 1.
    Bartilson, M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Nucleotide sequence and expression of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-encoding gene of phenol-catabolizing Pseudomonas CF600.1989In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 85, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pseudomonas CF600 degrades phenol and some of its methylated derivatives via a plasmid-encoded catabolic pathway. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) enzyme of this pathway catalyses the conversion of catechol to 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. We have determined the nucleotide (nt) sequence of the dmpB structural gene for this enzyme, and expressed and identified its polypeptide product in Escherichia coli. The xylE gene of TOL plasmid pWWO and the nahH gene of plasmid NAH7 encode analogous C23O enzymes. Comparison of these three genes shows homology of 78-81% on the nt level and 83-87% homology on the amino acid level.

  • 2. Charpentier, E
    et al.
    Gerbaud, G
    Courvalin, P
    Characterization of a new class of tetracycline-resistance gene tet(S) in Listeria monocytogenes BM4210.1993In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleotide sequence of the tetracycline (Tc)-minocycline (Mc)-resistance determinant of plasmid pIP811 from Listeria monocytogenes BM4210 has been determined. The gene, designated tet(S), was identified by analysis of the start and stop codons as a coding sequence of 1923 bp, corresponding to a protein with a calculated M(r) of 72,912. The apparent 68-kDa size estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of the protein characterized in a cell-free coupled transcription-translation system was in good agreement with the calculated value. The tet(S) gene product exhibits 79 and 72% amino acid identity with Tet(M) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Tet(O) from Campylobacter coli, respectively. The distribution of tet(S) in strains of Gram+ and Gram- genera resistant to Tc (TcR) and Mc (McR) was studied by hybridization under high stringency using a 590-bp intragenic probe. Homology with tet(S) was detected in two clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes isolated in different geographical areas.

  • 3. Eimert, K
    et al.
    Luo, C
    Dejardin, A
    Villand, P
    Thorbjornsen, T
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Molecular cloning and expression of the large subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves1997In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 189, no 1, p. 79-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cDNA clone, blpl14, corresponding to the large subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), has been isolated from a cDNA library prepared from leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). An open reading frame encodes a protein of 503 aa, with a calculated molecular weight of 54 815. The derived aa sequence contains a putative transit peptide sequence, required for targeting to plastids, and has a highly conserved positioning of critical Lys residues that are believed to be involved in effector binding. The derived aa sequence shows 97% identity with the corresponding protein from wheat, but only 36% identity with AGPase from E. coli. The blpl14 gene is expressed predominantly in leaves and to a lesser degree in seed endosperm, but not roots, of barley.

  • 4. Eimert, K
    et al.
    Villand, P
    Kilian, A
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Cloning and characterization of several cDNAs for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from barley (Hordeum vulgare) tissues1996In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 170, no 2, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eleven cDNA clones encoding UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) have been isolated from cDNA libraries prepared from seed embryo, seed endosperm and leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The sequences were identical, with the exception of positioning of the poly(A) tail; at least five clones with different polyadenylation sites were found. For a putative full-length cDNA [1775 nucleotides (nt) plus polyadenylation tail], isolated from an embryo cDNA library, an open reading frame of 1419 nt encodes a protein of 473 amino acids (aa) of 51.6 kDa. An alignment of the derived aa sequence with other UGPases has revealed high identity to UGPases from eukaryotic tissues, but not from bacteria. Within the aa sequence, no homology was found to a UDP-glucose-binding motif that has been postulated for a family of glucosyl transferases. The derived aa sequence of UGPase contains three putative N-glycosylation sites and has a highly conserved positioning of five Lys residues, previously shown to be critical for catalysis and substrate binding of potato tuber UGPase. A possible role for N-glycosylation in the intracellular targeting of UGPase is discussed.

  • 5.
    Gennebäck, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Malm, Linus
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Mörner, Stellan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Using OPLS-DA to find new hypotheses in vast amounts of gene expression data - Studying the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in the heart of aorta ligated rat2013In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 522, no 1, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the great problems facing science today lies in data mining of the vast amount of data. In this study we explore a new way of using orthogonal partial least squares-discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA) to analyze multidimensional data. Myocardial tissues from aorta ligated and control rats (sacrificed at the acute, the adaptive and the stable phases of hypertrophy) were analyzed with whole genome microarray and OPLS-DA. Five functional gene transcript groups were found to show interesting clusters associated with the aorta ligated or the control animals. Clustering of "ECM and adhesion molecules" confirmed previous results found with traditional statistics. The clustering of "Fatty acid metabolism", "Glucose metabolism", "Mitochondria" and "Atherosclerosis" which are new results is hard to interpret, thereby being possible subject to new hypothesis formation. We propose that OPLS-DA is very useful in finding new results not found with traditional statistics, thereby presenting an easy way of creating new hypotheses.

  • 6.
    Hiltonen, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Clarke, Adrian K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    A cDNA coding for glutathione S-transferase from the unicellular green algae Coccomyxa sp1996In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 176, no 1-2, p. 263-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cDNA coding for glutathione S-transferase (GST) was cloned and sequenced from the unicellular green algae Coccomyxa sp. The predicted 215 amino acid polypeptide (23.9 kDa, pI 5.3) is most similar to the theta-type GSTs found in a variety of different eukaryotic organisms. Within this sub-class, the Coccomyxa GST is 42% identical (63% similar) to the flatfish Pleuronectes platessa homologue, and 24 to 35% (49-57%) to other theta-type GST's.

  • 7.
    Holmlund, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Guo, Dongsheng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Starefeldt, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Characterization and tissue-specific expression of human LRIG22004In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 332, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently identified and cloned the human LRIG1 gene (formerly LIG1). LRIG1 is a predicted integral membrane protein with a domain organization reminiscent of the Drosophila epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor antagonist Kekkon-1. We have searched for additional members of the human LRIG family and identified LRIG2 (KIAA0806). The LRIG2 gene was localized to chromosome 1p13 and had an open reading frame of 1065 amino acids. The LRIG2 protein was predicted to have the same domain organization as LRIG1 with a signal peptide, an extracellular part containing15 leucine-rich repeats and three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The LRIG2 amino acid sequence was 47% identical to human LRIG1 and mouse Lrig1 (also known as Lig-1). Northern blotting and RT-PCR revealed LRIG2 transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed the most prominent RNA expression in skin, uterus, ovary, kidney, brain, small intestine, adrenal gland, and stomach. Immunoblotting of COS-7 cell lysates demonstrated that heterologously expressed human LRIG2 had an apparent molecular weight of 132 kDa under reducing gel-running conditions. N-glycosidase F treatment resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular weight to 107 kDa, showing that LRIG2 was a glycoprotein carrying N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal fluorescence laser microscopy demonstrated expression of LRIG2 both at the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. LRIG2 was detected in tissue lysates from stomach, prostate, lung, and fetal brain by immunoblotting. In conclusion, LRIG2 was found to be a glycoprotein which was encoded by a gene on human chromosome 1p13 and its mRNA was present in all tissues analyzed.

  • 8. Jafarzadeh, Meisam
    et al.
    Soltani, Bahram Mohammad
    Ekhteraei-Tousi, Samaneh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Behmanesh, Mehrdad
    Hsa-miR-497 as a new regulator in TGF beta signaling pathway and cardiac differentiation process2018In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 675, p. 150-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) contain cardiac stem cell subpopulations and are introduced as useful source for cardiac differentiation and therapy. Furthermore, research has highlighted miRNAs important role in various biological processes and cardiogenesis. Here, we intended to investigate the effect of hsa-miR-497 (miR-497) on TGF beta signaling pathway genes expression during the process of CDCs differentiation to cardiomyocytes. CDCs were successfully differentiated to the cardiac-like cells. In this study, we found that after cardiac differentiation induction, miR-497 expression was significantly decreased. Computational miRNA target prediction analyses revealed that TGF beta signaling pathway is a possible target of miR-497. Therefore, miR-497 was overexpressed in CDCs before the induction of differentiation. TGF beta 1, TGF beta R1, TGF beta R2, and SMAD3 genes expression level was decreased after miR-497 overexpression. Also, immunocytochemistry and cell morphology analysis indicated that miR-497 overexpression affecting cardiac differentiation process. Finally, direct interaction of miR-497 with 3'-UTR sequence of TGF beta R1 was supported through dual luciferase assay, consistent with miR-497 reported negative effect on SMAD3 expression. Accordingly, here a model of miR-497 involvement in regulation of TGF beta signaling pathway is introduced in which, side branches of TGF beta signaling pathway downregulate miR-497 to ensure upregulation of TGF beta R1 and TGF beta R2 and finally stronger TGF beta signaling.

  • 9. Kalla, R
    et al.
    Bhalerao, RP
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Regulation of phycobilisome rod proteins and messenger-RNA at different light intensities in the cyanobacterium synechococcus 63011993In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The regulation of the light-harvesting antennae, the phycobilisome (Pbs), and the cpcB1A1-cpcH-cpcI-cpcD operon encoding the structural proteins of the Pbs rod, was studied in the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 6301, when grown at different light intensities (li). Pbs were purified and their linker protein (LP) profiles analyzed on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. At increasing li, the amount of the distal 30-kDa LP decreased prior to any change in the amount of the proximal 33-kDa LP, indicating a sequential increase in the Pbs rod length. While the amount of LP in the rod decreased with increasing li, the levels of the LP mRNAs increased. Post-transcriptional regulation of the expression of the polycistronic cpcB1A1-cpcH-cpcI-cpcD mRNA was inferred from these observations. The half-life of the mRNAs studied was typically found to be 7 min with four exceptions: (1 and 2) the half-lives for the 3.4- and 3.7-kb polycistronic LP mRNAs were 16 and 1 min at the low (lli) and high li (hli), respectively; (3) the half-life of the 1.4-kb cpcB1A1 mRNA was 2 min at lli; and (4) the 1.3-kb cpcB1A1 transcript had a half-life of 10 min at lli. At hli, it was found that the 1.3-kb cpcB1A1 transcript did not start to disappear until the amount of the 1.4-kb cpcB1A1 transcript had reached the level equal to that of the 1.3-kb mRNA, implying that the 1.4-kb transcript might be processed to the 1.3-kb form.

  • 10. Kwiatkowski, B A
    et al.
    Zielińska-Kwiatkowska, A G
    Migdalski, A
    Kleczkowski, L A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Wasilewska, L D
    Cloning of two cDNAs encoding calnexin-like and calreticulin-like proteins from maize (Zea mays) leaves: identification of potential calcium-binding domains.1995In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 165, no 2, p. 219-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two cDNAs encoding calnexin (Cln)-like and calreticulin (Crl)-like proteins have been isolated by immunoscreening of a maize leaf cDNA library. In the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences, several regions that are conserved for Cln and Crl proteins from all sources have been identified. These regions can be classified into two distinct motifs which are repeated four times each in Cln and three times each in Crl sequences. One of these motifs, containing a highly acidic 17-aa sequence, has high homology to a Ca(2+)-binding domain previously characterized in both Cln and Crl from mammalian tissues. Motifs for retention in endoplasmic reticulum (Crl) and for an integral membrane-spanning sequence (Cln) have also been identified.

  • 11.
    Luan, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Granlund, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Norgren, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    An inserted DNA fragment with plasmid features is uniquely associated with the presence of the GBSi1 group II intron in Streptococcus agalactiae.2003In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 312, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Meng, Meng
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Geisler, Matt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Johansson, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Karpinski, Stanislaw
    Department of Botany, Stockholm University.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Differential tissue/organ-dependent expression of two sucrose- and cold-responsive genes for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Populus.2007In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 389, no 2, p. 186-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant UDP-glucose (UDPG) pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) is involved in the production/metabolism of UDPG, a key metabolite for sucrose and cell wall biosynthesis. Two highly similar cDNAs (UGP1 and UGP2) corresponding to UGPase were isolated from cDNA libraries of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides). Expression of both UGPs, as studied by DNA microarrays and EST abundance, was compared to that of three sucrose synthase genes (SUS1–3), also involved in UDPG synthesis. Generally, the UGPs had lower expression than SUS1 and SUS2 genes (especially in tension wood and cambium), with the notable exception of leaves, primary roots and flowers. Based on real-time quantitative PCR, UGP1 in root xylem, leaves and male flowers was by far the predominant transcript, while in other tissues both UGP1 and UGP2 had comparable expression. In leaves, the UGP1 gene, but not UGP2, was upregulated by light and short-term sucrose feeding. Cold treatment led to dramatic organ-specific changes in relative expression of both genes, with UGP2 being upregulated either transiently (leaves), long-term (stems) or not at all (roots), whereas UGP1 was cold-upregulated in all organs. Individual or overall UGP expression patterns only weakly correlated with UGPase activity/protein; however, UGPase activity and protein were correlated in all tissues/conditions. The data suggest that UGPs are differentially expressed at the tissue level and in response to metabolic feedback (sucrose) and cold stress, and point to a tight posttranscriptional/translational control and, possibly, distinct roles for those genes.

  • 13.
    Milton, Debra L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Norqvist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Sequence of a novel virulence-mediating gene, virC, from Vibrio anguillarum1995In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 164, no 1, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, the double-transposon (Tn) mutant VAN20 of Vibrio anguillarum (Va) 775.17B was isolated. This mutant lacked a major surface antigen (MSA) suggested to be a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and showed a 10(5)-fold increase in the 50% lethal dose (LD50) when fish were infected intraperitoneally. In this study, the two Tn insertion sites within the chromosome were identified, a plasmid insertion mutation was made at each locus in a more virulent strain of Va, NB10, and the virulence was analyzed. One mutant displayed a 10(4)-fold increase in LD50, whereas the second mutant showed the wild-type (wt) phenotype. However, both mutants still expressed the MSA, suggesting that there may be more than two Tn insertions in VAN20 or that a double mutation is required to prevent production of the MSA. The DNA locus for the virulent phenotype was cloned and sequenced. A potential transcriptional unit consisting of three putative open reading frames (ORFs) was identified. The Tn was located in the second ORF, virC (virulence). The first ORF (34.8 kDa) showed 30% homology to the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cysG (cysteine) genes. The virC gene (51.4 kDa) and the third ORF (24 kDa) showed no homology to other proteins in GenBank. Plasmid insertion mutants were made within each of these ORFs and the virulence was assayed. Only the virC mutant showed a loss in virulence, indicating that virC is a novel gene that is essential for the virulence of Va.

  • 14.
    Ng, L C
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Sze, C C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Poh, C L
    Cloning and sequences of the first eight genes of the chromosomally encoded (methyl) phenol degradation pathway from Pseudomonas putida P35X.1994In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 151, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pseudomonas putida P35X (NCIB 9869) metabolises phenol and cresols via a chromosomally encoded meta-cleavage pathway. A 13.4-kb fragment of the chromosome involved in encoding phenol catabolism was cloned and characterized. Deletion analysis and nucleotide sequencing of a 6589-bp region, in conjunction with enzyme assays, were used to identify the phhKLMNOP genes encoding the phenol hydroxylase, the phhB gene encoding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.2) and the phhQ gene that encodes a small ferredoxin-like protein. The genes are organised in an operon-like structure, in the order phhKLMNOPQB, and the deduced amino-acid sequences share high homology (68.3-99.7%) with those of the plasmid-encoded genes dmpKLMNOPQB of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. Genetic evidence is presented that the difference in the growth substrate ranges of Pseudomonas P35X and CF600 are due to the effector activation specificities of the regulators of these systems, rather than the substrate specificities of the catabolic enzymes.

  • 15. Raychaudhuri, Saumya
    et al.
    Jain, Vibhu
    Dongre, Mitesh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Identification of a constitutively active variant of LuxO that affects production of HA/protease and biofilm development in a non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae O110.2006In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 369, p. 126-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae depends on the concerted action of numerous virulence factors that includes a secreted hemagglutinin (HA) protease. Recent studies have evidenced that the expression of these virulence factors as well as the genes responsible for biofilm development is subject to control by quorum sensing in this organism. At low cell density, LuxO, the pivotal regulator of quorum-sensing circuit, has been shown to be phosphorylated at aspartate-47. Working in concert with sigma-54, LuxO-P activates the downstream repressor, which turned out to be four sRNAs [Lenz, D.H., Mok, K.C., Lilley, B.N., Kulkarni, R.V., Wingreen, N.S., Bassler, B.L., 2004. The small RNA chaperone Hfq and multiple small RNAs control quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae. Cell 118, 69-82]. Subsequently, these sRNAs form complex with sRNA chaperone, Hfq. The Hfq-sRNA complex causes the destabilization of hapR mRNA transcript. HapR is a positive regulator of hapA that encodes HA/protease. At high cell density, dephosphorylation of LuxO impairs its function to activate the expression of sRNA, which in turn promotes HapR expression and causes protease production. It has been demonstrated that conversion of aspartate to glutamate (D47E) renders the LuxO molecule active without being phosphorylated. This variant of LuxO is referred as constitutively active LuxO or con-LuxO [Freeman, J.A., Bassler, B.L., 1999. A genetic analysis of the function of LuxO, a two-component response regulator involved in quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi. Mol Microbiol 31, 665-677]. Other than D47E, mutation at L104Q also develops con-LuxO [Vance, R.E., Zhu, J., Mekalanos, J.J., 2003. A constitutively active variant of the quorum-sensing regulator LuxO affects protease production and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae. Infect. Immun. 71, 2571-2576]. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cause of protease negative phenotype of a non-O1, non-O139 strain of V. cholerae O110. In the process of exploring the nature of the phenotype, a constitutively active variant of LuxO molecule was characterized which represses protease production and enhances biofilm formation by this strain. Unlike luxU, disruption of luxO restored the protease production, which showed the constitutively active nature of LuxO protein in this strain.

  • 16.
    Wu, Shi-Xun
    et al.
    College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases of Ministry Education, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Ministry of Health, Xi'an, China; Department of Orthopedics Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.
    Wang, Wei-Zhuo
    Department of Orthopedics Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.
    Zhang, Feng
    aculty of Public Health, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases of Ministry Education, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Ministry of Health, Xi'an, China.
    Wu, Cui-Yan
    aculty of Public Health, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases of Ministry Education, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Ministry of Health, Xi'an, China.
    Dennis, Bannel
    aculty of Public Health, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases of Ministry Education, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Ministry of Health, Xi'an, China.
    Qu, Cheng-Juan
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Bai, Yi-Dong
    Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, USA.
    Guo, Xiong
    College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases of Ministry Education, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Ministry of Health, Xi'an, China.
    Expression profiles of genes involved in apoptosis and selenium metabolism in articular cartilage of patients with Kashin-Beck osteoarthritis.2014In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 535, no 2, p. 124-130, article id 24316489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a special type of endemic osteoarthritis. It has been suggested that alterations in selenium metabolism and apoptosis play a role in KBD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unclear. We performed a microarray analysis using RNA isolated from cartilages of KBD patients and healthy controls, through Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) software. Functional gene networks and crucial molecules associated with differentially expressed genes were investigated via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and hub gene analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to check the validation of chip test. We identified 52 up-regulated apoptosis-related genes and 26 down-regulated selenium-related genes between KBD and controls, and these genes associated with the "MYC-mediated apoptosis signaling pathway". We confirmed the results from array studies with quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Our results suggest that abnormal regulation of selenium metabolism and apoptosis through the MYC mediated signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of KBD, but the relationship between apoptosis gene and selenium gene was not found.

  • 17. Zhou, G Q
    et al.
    Zhang, Y
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family in non-human primates.2001In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 264, no 1, p. 105-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a tumor marker of wide clinical use though its function remains unknown. The CEA counterpart and some related macromolecules cannot be demonstrated in mice, thus prohibiting studies of CEA function by gene disruption strategies. In an attempt to find a relevant animal model for functional studies of CEA we have investigated the occurrence of CEA subgroup members in baboon and African green monkey at the genomic and mRNA levels. The investigation was focused on the characteristic immunoglobulin-variable region-like (IgV-like) N-terminal domain of the family members. Based on N-domain sequences 3 and 4 different CEA subgroup genes, respectively, were identified. One sequence in each monkey species corresponded to human CEACAM8, while it was not possible to assign an obvious human counterpart for the other N-domain sequences. However, studies of cDNAs from African green monkey COS-1 cells identified one of the sequences as CEACAM1. Expression of CEACAM1 mRNA and protein was upregulated by IFNgamma as has previously been demonstrated for human CEACAM1. Presence of GPI-linked CEA subgroup members in African green monkey was suggested by sequencing. Both monkey species would thus seem suitable for functional studies of selected CEA subgroup members.

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