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  • 1.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    British picnics come of age: food and fashionability in the 1930s2018In: Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, ISSN 2169-2971, E-ISSN 2169-298X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Picnics are an ephemeral feature of social life and suggest a meal that is different in form, eaten in unfamiliar surroundings, and often representing an escape from routine. Although picnics might be regarded as a longstanding tradition in Britain, they were popularized in the 1930s as an adjunct to substantial changes in leisure patterns, and by the opportunities provided by private and public transport. Newspapers reflected this popularity in their coverage. Using digital archive material, primarily for The Times and the Manchester Guardian, period newspaper reports were analyzed in terms of popularity, advice on what to eat, the consumer market for equipment, and rural impact. Picnics, goods, and services connected with them, and the negative environmental consequences of picnicking were regular features of media discourse during the period 1930–1939: this coverage represent a window into the perhaps surprising fashionability of what is now a tacit feature of food culture.

  • 2.
    Sundqvist, Joachim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Walter, Ute
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts. School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Eat, sleep, fly, repeat: meal patterns among Swedish business travellers2020In: Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, ISSN 2169-2971, E-ISSN 2169-298X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over half of the annual guests at Swedish hotels are supplied by the corporate sector. These guests are made up of individuals who travel for meetings, conferences, or presentations as a part of their job. Access to meals while travelling is essential and introduces added complexity to the business travellers’ everyday lives. These meals, and the pattern in which they are consumed, are part of the individual traveller’s personal and group identities. Therefore, the aim of this article is to study if business travellers deviate from their habitual meal patterns and if so - what changes they make. To further the understanding of this group’s meal patterns, a questionnaire was created and distributed. It was answered by 538 self-identified business travellers. These business travellers were made up of three groups – solo travellers, group travellers, and individuals who travelled both in groups as well as alone. Pearson’s chi-squared test was used to analyse differences in actions related to the meal pattern between groups. The analysis showed that changes in the meal pattern did occur in some instances. However, the majority of the business travellers adhered to their habitual meal pattern while adjusting their behaviour depending on the time of day. Managers of catering suppliers gaining insight into the meal habits of business travellers could help to ease an otherwise stressful situation by supplying meals, as a context, that fit with the business travellers’ habitual patterns and meal contexts.

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