umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Basu, Sanjay
    et al.
    Wagner, Ryan G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Sewpaul, Ronel
    Reddy, Priscilla
    Davies, Justine
    Implications of scaling up cardiovascular disease treatment in South Africa: a microsimulation and cost-effectiveness analysis2019In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. E270-E280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors-particularly hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and diabetes-have become an increasing concern for middle-income countries. Using newly available, nationally representative data, we assessed how cardiovascular risk factors are distributed across subpopulations within South Africa and identified which cardiovascular treatments should be prioritised.

    Methods: We created a demographically representative simulated population for South Africa and used data from 17 743 respondents aged 15 years or older of the 2012 South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (SANHANES) to assign information on cardiovascular risk factors to each member of the simulated population. We created a microsimulation model to estimate the health and economic implications of two globally recognised treatment recommendations: WHO's package of essential non-communicable disease interventions (PEN) and South Africa's Primary Care 101 (SA PC 101) guidelines. The primary outcome was total disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted through treatment of all cardiovascular disease or microvascular type 2 diabetes complications per 1000 population. We compared outcomes at the aspirational level of achieving access to treatment among 70% of the population.

    Findings: Based on the SANHANES data, South Africans had a high prevalence of hypertension (24.8%), dyslipidaemia (17.5%), and diabetes (15.3%). Prevalence was disproportionately high and treatment low among male, black, and poor populations. Our simulated population experienced a burden of 40.0 DALYs (95% CI 29.5-52.0) per 1000 population per year from cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes complications at current treatment levels, which lowered to 32.9 DALYs (24.4-44.7) under WHO PEN implementation and to 32.5 (24.4-44.8) under SA PC 101 implementation. Under both guidelines, there were increases in blood pressure treatment (4.2 percentage points under WHO PEN vs 12.6 percentage points under SA PC 101), lipid treatment (16.0 vs 14.9), and glucose control medications (1.2 vs 0.6). The incremental cost-effectiveness of implementing SA PC 101 over current treatment would be a saving of US$ 24 902 (95% CI 14 666-62 579) per DALY averted compared with a saving of $ 17 587 (1840-42 589) under WHO PEN guidelines.

    Interpretation: Cardiovascular risk factors are common and disproportionate among disadvantaged populations in South Africa. Treatment with blood pressure agents and statins might need greater prioritisation than blood glucose therapies, which contrasts with observed treatment levels despite a lower monthly cost of blood pressure or statin treatment than of sulfonylurea or insulin treatment.

    Funding: Stanford University. 

  • 2.
    Baudin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Jumaa, Ammar M.
    Jomma, Huda J. E.
    Karsany, Mubarak S.
    Bucht, Göran
    Näslund, Jonas
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Association of Rift Valley fever virus infection with miscarriage in Sudanese women: a cross-sectional study2016In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 4, no 11, p. e864-e871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever virus is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that causes infections in animals and human beings in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever lead to mass abortions in livestock, but such abortions have not been identified in human bezings. Our aim was to investigate the cause of miscarriages in febrile pregnant women in an area endemic for Rift Valley fever.

    METHODS: Pregnant women with fever of unknown origin who attended the governmental hospital of Port Sudan, Sudan, between June 30, 2011, and Nov 17, 2012, were sampled at admission and included in this cross-sectional study. Medical records were retrieved and haematological tests were done on patient samples. Presence of viral RNA as well as antibodies against a variety of viruses were analysed. Any association of viral infections, symptoms, and laboratory parameters to pregnancy outcome was investigated using Pearson's χ(2) test.

    FINDINGS: Of 130 pregnant women with febrile disease, 28 were infected with Rift Valley fever virus and 31 with chikungunya virus, with typical clinical and laboratory findings for the infection in question. 15 (54%) of 28 women with an acute Rift Valley fever virus infection had miscarriages compared with 12 (12%) of 102 women negative for Rift Valley fever virus (p<0·0001). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, haemorrhagic disease, and chikungunya virus infection, an acute Rift Valley fever virus infection was an independent predictor of having a miscarriage (odds ratio 7·4, 95% CI 2·7-20·1; p<0·0001).

    INTERPRETATION: This study is the first to show an association between infection with Rift Valley fever virus and miscarriage in pregnant women. Further studies are warranted to investigate the possible mechanisms. Our findings have implications for implementation of preventive measures, and evidence-based information to the public in endemic countries should be strongly recommended during Rift Valley fever outbreaks.

    FUNDING: Schlumberger Faculty for the Future, CRDF Global (31141), the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, the County Council of Västerbotten, and the Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University.

  • 3. Beran, David
    et al.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gbakima, Aiah
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Sankoh, Osman
    Tollman, Stephen
    Witham, Miles
    Davies, Justine
    Bringing all together for research capacity building in LMICs2017In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 5, no 9, p. E870-E870Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Beran, David
    et al.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gbakima, Aiah
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sankoh, Osman
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Witham, Miles
    Davies, Justine
    Research capacity building-obligations for global health partners2017In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 5, no 6, p. E567-E568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. edical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Cause-specific mortality findings from the Global Burden of Disease project and the INDEPTH Network2016In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 4, no 11, p. e785-e786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, School of Public Health, Education Campus, University of Witwatersrand, Parktown, South Africa.
    Jackson Cole, Catherine
    Davies, Justine I.
    Geldsetzer, Pascal
    Witham, Miles D.
    Wu, Yan
    Collaboration for impact in global health2018In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e836-e837Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. D'Ambruoso, Lucia
    et al.
    Boerma, Ties
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Fottrell, Edward
    Herbst, Kobus
    Källander, Karin
    Mullan, Zoë
    The case for verbal autopsy in health systems strengthening2017In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. e20-e21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Davies, Justine Ina
    et al.
    Macnab, Andrew John
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, South Africa; MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Norris, Shane A.
    Nyirenda, Moffat
    Singhal, Atul
    Sobngwi, Eugene
    Daar, Abdallah S.
    Developmental origins of health and disease in Africa: influencing early life2018In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. E244-E245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Garenne, Michel
    et al.
    Collinson, Mark A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Univ Witwatersrand, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, MRC Wits Rural Publ Hlth & Hlth Transit Res Unit, Johannesburg, South Africa. Inst Pasteur, Epidemiol Malad Emergentes, Paris, France.
    Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W.
    Gomez-Olive, F. Xavier
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Univ Witwatersrand, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, MRC Wits Rural Publ Hlth & Hlth Transit Res Unit, Johannesburg, South Africa. INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana.
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Univ Witwatersrand, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, MRC Wits Rural Publ Hlth & Hlth Transit Res Unit, Johannesburg, South Africa. INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana.
    Improving completeness of birth and death registration in rural Africa2016In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 4, no 9, p. E604-E605Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W.
    et al.
    Houle, Brian
    Collinson, Mark A.
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gomez-Olive, Francesc Xavier
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Clark, Samuel J.
    Socioeconomic differences in mortality in the antiretroviral therapy era in Agincourt, rural South Africa, 2001-13: a population surveillance analysis2017In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 5, no 9, p. E924-E935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Understanding the effects of socioeconomic disparities in health outcomes is important to implement specific preventive actions. We assessed socioeconomic disparities in mortality indicators in a rural South African population over the period 2001-13.

    Methods We used data from 21 villages of the Agincourt Health and socio-Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). We calculated the probabilities of death from birth to age 5 years and from age 15 to 60 years, life expectancy at birth, and cause-specific and age-specific mortality by sex (not in children <5 years), time period, and socioeconomic status (household wealth) quintile for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, other communicable diseases (excluding HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis) and maternal, perinatal, and nutritional causes, non-communicable diseases, and injury. We also quantified differences with relative risk ratios and relative and slope indices of inequality.

    Findings Between 2001 and 2013, 10 414 deaths were registered over 1 058 538 person-years of follow-up, meaning the overall crude mortality was 9.8 deaths per 1000 person-years. We found significant socioecomonic status gradients for mortality and life expectancy at birth, with outcomes improving with increasing socioeconomic status. An inverse relation was seen for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis mortality and socioeconomic status that persisted from 2001 to 2013. Deaths from non-communicable diseases increased over time in both sexes, and injury was an important cause of death in men and boys. Neither of these causes of death, however, showed consistent significant associations with household socioeconomic status.

    Interpretation The poorest people in the population continue to bear a high burden of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis mortality, despite free antiretroviral therapy being made available from public health facilities. Associations between socioeconomic status and increasing burden of mortality from non-communicable diseases is likely to become prominent. Integrated strategies are needed to improve access to and uptake of HIV testing, care, and treatment, and management of non-communicable diseases in the poorest populations.

  • 11. Nyirenda, Moffat J
    et al.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pregnancy, programming, and predisposition2019In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e404-e405Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12. Sankoh, Osman
    et al.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    New INDEPTH strategy for the SDGs using robust population data2017In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 5, no 7, p. e647-e648Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf