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  • 1.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Corneliusson, Laura
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Anderson, Ruth A.
    Beeber, Anna
    Boas, Paulo Villas
    Corazzini, Kirsten
    Gordon, Adam L.
    Hanratty, Barbara
    Jacinto, Alessandro
    Lepore, Michael
    Leung, Angela Y. M.
    McGilton, Katherine S.
    Meyer, Julienne
    Schols, Jos M. G. A.
    Schwartz, Lindsay
    Shepherd, Victoria
    Skoldunger, Anders
    Thompson, Roy
    Toles, Mark
    Wachholz, Patrick
    Wang, Jing
    Wu, Bei
    Zuniga, Franziska
    Advancing Long-Term Care Science Through Using Common Data Elements: Candidate Measures for Care Outcomes of Personhood, Well-Being, and Quality of Life2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support the development of internationally comparable common data elements (CDEs) that can be used to measure essential aspects of long-term care (LTC) across low-, middle-, and high-income countries, a group of researchers in medicine, nursing, behavioral, and social sciences from 21 different countries have joined forces and launched the Worldwide Elements to Harmonize Research in LTC Living Environments (WE-THRIVE) initiative. This initiative aims to develop a common data infrastructure for international use across the domains of organizational context, workforce and staffing, person-centered care, and care outcomes, as these are critical to LTC quality, experiences, and outcomes. This article reports measurement recommendations for the care outcomes domain, focusing on previously prioritized care outcomes concepts of well-being, quality of life (QoL), and personhood for residents in LTC. Through literature review and expert ranking, we recommend nine measures of well-being, QoL, and personhood, as a basis for developing CDEs for long-term care outcomes across countries. Data in LTC have often included deficit-oriented measures; while important, reductions do not necessarily mean that residents are concurrently experiencing well-being. Enhancing measurement efforts with the inclusion of these positive LTC outcomes across countries would facilitate international LTC research and align with global shifts toward healthy aging and person-centered LTC models.

  • 2. Siegel, Elena O.
    et al.
    Backman, Annica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Cai, Yi
    Goodman, Claire
    Ocho, Oscar Noel
    Wei, Sijia
    Wu, Bei
    Xu, Hanzhang
    Understanding Contextual Differences in Residential LTC Provision for Cross-National Research: Identifying Internationally Relevant CDEs2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5, p. 1-8Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term care (LTC) reflects a growing emphasis on person-centered care (PCC), with services oriented around individuals' needs and preferences. Addressing contextual and cultural differences across countries offers important insight into factors that facilitate or hinder application of PCC practices within and across countries. This article takes an international lens to consider country-specific contexts of LTC, describing preliminary steps to develop common data elements that capture contextual differences across LTC settings globally. Through an iterative series of online, telephone, and in-person sessions, we engaged in in-depth discussions with 11 colleague experts in residential LTC and coauthors from six countries (China and Hong Kong, England, Sweden, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, and the United States). Our discussions yielded rich narrative describing a vast range in types of LTC settings, leading to our development of a working definition of residential LTC. Scope of services, funding, ownership, and regulations varied greatly across countries and across different residential LTC settings within countries. Moving forward, we recommend expanding our activities to countries that reflect different stages of residential LTC development. Our goal is to contribute to a larger initiative underway by the WE-THRIVE consortium to establish a global research measurement infrastructure that advances PCC internationally.

  • 3.
    Strinnholm, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Depressive Disorders and Religious Engagement in Very Old People2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine associations between religious engagement and depressive disorders in very old people.

    Method: This cross-sectional study uses data from the Umea 85+/Gerontological Regional Database (GERDA) study. Every other 85-year-old, every 90-year-old, and everyone more than 95 years from eight municipalities in northern Sweden and Finland were invited: 1,014 persons accepted participation. Data were gathered using questionnaires and assessment scales during structured home visits.

    Results: The prevalence of depressive disorders was 35.8%. In a logistic regression model, several factors were adjusted for, such as demographic variables including social factors, diseases, and cognitive and physical functional level. A high level of self-reported religious engagement was independently associated with not having depressive disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58, confidence interval [CI] = [0.38, 0.89]). After stratifying by gender, religious engagement was only significant for women (OR = 0.49, CI = [0.29, 0.82]).

    Discussion: There is an association between a high level of religious engagement and being free from diagnosis of depressive disorders among very old women.

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