umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gangane, Nitin
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha, India.
    Khairkar, Pravin
    Department of Psychiatry, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha, India.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    San Sebastián, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Quality of Life Determinants in Breast Cancer Patients in Central Rural India2017In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 3325-3332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women throughout world, with incidence rates increasing in India. Improved survival in breast cancer patients has resulted in their quality of life (QOL) becoming an important issue. Identifying determinants for QOL may provide insights into how to improve their living conditions. This study aimed to assess socio-demographic and clinical factors, as well as the role of self-efficacy, in relation to QOL among women with breast cancer in rural India. Methods: A total of 208 female patients with infiltrating carcinoma of the breast participated in the study. A questionnaire was administered that included sections for socio-demographic characteristics, clinical stage of the cancer and patient delay in seeking health care. A standardized instrument to measure self-efficacy was applied. To assess QOL, the WHOQOL – BREF instrument was used. Results: The overall mean score for QOL was 59.3. For domain 1 (physical health) the mean score across all groups was 55.5, for psychological health 58.2, for social relationships 63.2 and for environmental factors, 60.4. The environmental domain in QOL was negatively associated with lower education. Being divorced/widowed/unmarried had a negative association with the psychological health and social relationship dimensions, whereas higher income was positively associated with QOL parameters such as psychology, social relationships and environmental factors. Self-efficacy was positively associated with all four domains of QOL. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated a moderate QOL in women with breast cancer in rural India. Young age, lack of education and being without a partner were negatively related to QOL, and employment as casual and industrial workers, high monthly family income and higher self-efficacy were positively associated with QOL. A comprehensive public health initiative is required, including social, financial and environmental support, that can provide better QOL for breast cancer survivors.

  • 2.
    Gangane, Nitin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Department of Pathology, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha, India.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sebastian, Miguel San
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Women's Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about Breast Cancer in a Rural District of Central India2015In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 6863-6870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer accounted for almost 25% of all cancers in women globally in 2012. Although breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in India, there is no organised national breast cancer screening programme. Local studies on the burden of breast cancer are essential to develop effective context-specific strategies for an early detection breast cancer programme, considering the cultural and ethnic heterogeneity in India. This study examined the knowledge, attitudes, and practices about breast cancer in rural women in Central India.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: This community-based cross sectional study was conducted in Wardha district, located in Maharashtra state in Central India in 2013. The sample included 1000 women (609 rural, 391 urban) aged 13-50 years, selected as representative from each of the eight development blocks in the district, using stratified cluster sampling. Trained social workers interviewed women and collected demographic and socio-economic data. The instrument also assessed respondents' knowledge about breast cancer and its symptoms, risks, methods of screening, diagnosis and treatment, as well as their attitudes towards breast cancer and self- reported practices of breast cancer screening. Chi-square and t-test were applied to assess differences in the levels of knowledge, attitude, and practice (the outcome variables) between urban and rural respondents. Multivariable linear regression was conducted to analyse the relationship between socio-demographic factors and the outcome variables.

    RESULTS: While about two-thirds of rural and urban women were aware of breast cancer, less than 7% in rural and urban areas had heard about breast self-examination. Knowledge about breast cancer, its symptoms, risk factors, diagnostic modalities, and treatment was similarly poor in both rural and urban women. Urban women demonstrated more positive attitudes towards breast cancer screening practices than their rural counterparts. Better knowledge of breast cancer symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment correlated significantly with older age, higher levels of education, and being office workers or in business.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women in rural Central India have poor knowledge about breast cancer, its symptoms and risk factors. Breast self-examination is hardly practiced, though the willingness to learn is high. Positive attitudes towards screening provide an opportunity to promote breast self-examination.

  • 3. Giang, Kim Bao
    et al.
    Chung, Le Hong
    Minh, Hoang Van
    Kien, Vu Duy
    Hanoi School of Public Health.
    Giap, Vu Van
    Hinh, Nguyen Duc
    Cuong, Nguyen Manh
    Manh, Pham Duc
    Duc, Ha Anh
    Yang, Jui-Chen
    Relative Importance of Different Attributes of Graphic Health Warnings on Tobacco Packages in Viet Nam2016In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 17, p. 79-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphic health warnings (GHW) on tobacco packages have proven to be effective in increasing quit attempts among smokers and reducing initial smoking among adolescents. This research aimed to examine the relative importance of different attributes of graphic health warnings on tobacco packages in Viet Nam. A discrete choice experimental (DCE) design was applied with a conditional logit model. In addition, a ranking method was used to list from the least to the most dreadful GHW labels. With the results from DCE model, graphic type was shown to be the most important attribute, followed by cost and coverage area of GHW. The least important attribute was position of the GHW. Among 5 graphic types (internal lung cancer image, external damaged teeth, abstract image, human suffering image and text), the image of lung cancer was found to have the strongest influence on both smokers and non-smokers. With ranking method, the image of throat cancer and heart diseases were considered the most dreadful images. GHWs should be designed with these attributes in mind, to maximise influence on purchase among both smokers and non-smokers.

  • 4. Minh, Hoang Van
    et al.
    Ngan, Tran Thu
    Mai, Vu Quynh
    My, Nguyen Thi Tuyet
    Chung, Le Hong
    Kien, Vu Duy
    Hanoi School of Public Health.
    Anh, Tran Tuan
    Ngoc, Nguyen Bao
    Giap, Vu Van
    Cuong, Nguyen Manh
    Manh, Pham Duc
    Giang, Kim Bao
    Tobacco Control Policies in Vietnam: Review on MPOWER Implementation Progress and Challenges2016In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 17, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Vietnam, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) took effect in March 2005 while MPOWER has been implemented since 2008. This paper describes the progress and challenges of implementation of the MPOWER package in Vietnam. We can report that, in term of monitoring, Vietnam is very active in the Global Tobacco Surveillance System, completing two rounds of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) and three rounds of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS). To protect people from tobacco smoke, Vietnam has issued and enforced a law requiring comprehensive smoking bans at workplaces and public places since 2013. Tobacco advertising and promotion are also prohibited with the exception of points of sale displays of tobacco products. Violations come in the form of promotion girls, corporate social responsibility activities from tobacco manufacturers and packages displayed by retail vendors. Vietnam is one of the 77 countries that require pictorial health warnings to be printed on cigarette packages to warn about the danger of tobacco and the warnings have been implemented effectively. Cigarette tax is 70% of factory price which is equal to less than 45% of retail price and much lower than the recommendation of WHO. However, Vietnam is one of the very few countries that require manufacturers and importers to make "compulsory contributions" at 1-2% of the factory price of cigarettes sold in Vietnam for the establishment of a Tobacco Control Fund (TCF). The TCF is being operated well. In 2015, 67 units of 63 provinces/cities, 22 ministries and political-social organizations and 6 hospitals received funding from TCF to implement a wide range of tobacco control activities. Cessation services have been starting with a a toll-free quit-line but need to be further strengthened. In conclusion, Vietnam has constantly put efforts into the tobacco control field with high commitment from the government, scientists and activists. Though several remarkable achievements have been gained, many challenges remain. To overcome those challenges, implementation strategies that take into account the contextual factors and social determinants of tobacco use in Vietnam are needed.

  • 5. Taha, Hana
    et al.
    Halabi, Yara
    Berggren, Vanja
    Jaouni, Salma
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Al-Qutob, Raeda
    Wahlström, Rolf
    Educational intervention to improve breast health knowledge among women in Jordan2010In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1167-1173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Jordan and on average 70% of the cases present at advanced stages. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a public educational campaign conducted by the Jordan Breast Cancer Program to improve breast health knowledge among Jordanian women and to relate their knowledge to breast health practices.

    Methods: The campaign was conducted in five governorates in Jordan with a total of 105 public group lectures about breast cancer focusing on early detection. The total number of participants was 2,554 women with a median age of 37 years (range: 15-73 years). Median number of women per lecture was 24 (range: 9-38). Before the lectures, the women answered a structured questionnaire about their knowledge and practices. After the intervention 2,418 of them filled a post-test questionnaire with the same content. Correct answers on the 15 knowledge questions yielded a maximum score of 15. Determinants of breast health practices were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis.

    Results: The mean knowledge score increased significantly from 10.9 in the pre-test to 13.5 in the post-test (p<0.001). The percentage with a minimum of 14 correct answers to the 15 questions increased from 18 to 63% (p<0.001). Adequate breast health practices were generally low but increased significantly with increasing age and attendance at a previous lecture on breast cancer. Breast health practices were also higher among married women and housewives, and significantly associated with older age and greater breast health knowledge (p<0.001).

    Conclusions: Group educational lectures appeared effective for improving breast health knowledge among Jordanian women. However, even with the noticeable level of knowledge at the baseline, there were low breast health practices among the study participants. This necessitates further in-depth research to explore womens experiences and socio-cultural barriers to breast health seeking behaviour in Jordan.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf