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  • 1.
    Hansson, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Educational Activities at the Sami Folk High School 1942-19822015Ingår i: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 6, nr 9, s. 880-897Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sami folk high school started in 1942 as a school for young Sami that needed more education that the Swedish folk school or nomadic school offered its pupils. The school was managed by the Swedish mission society, an organization within the Swedish church. The school was successful but struggled with financial problems. The result was that a foundation with Sami representation managed the school instead after 1972. The following year was even more successful. The number of students increased, and the management could offer more courses and their curriculum had more Sami elements than earlier. However, there was also some conflicts during the 1970s. The largest one being the language boycott addressing the issue of Sami languages at the Sami folk high school as a subject in the school, and as an important part of the Sami culture and identity. This article describes the education of the Sami folk high school’s first 40 years with the help of a model for Sami pedagogy developed by Keskitalo and Määttä. The model shows that the education is to a large extent affected by outer factors—self determination, as well as inner factors—language issues and the curriculum.

  • 2.
    Häll, Lars O.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Exploring collaborative training with educational computer assisted simulations in health care education: An empirical ecology of resources study2012Ingår i: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 3, nr 6A, s. 784-795Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores collaborative training with educational computer assisted simulations (ECAS) in health care education. The use of simulation technology is increasing in health care education (Issenberg et al., 2005; Bradley, 2006), and research is addressing the techniques of its application. Calls have been made for informing the field with existing and future educational research (e.g. Issenberg et al., 2011). This study investigates and examines collaboration as a technique for structuring simulation training. Part of a larger research and development project (Häll et al., 2011; Häll & Söderström, 2012), this paper pri- marily utilizes qualitative observation analysis of dentistry students learning radiology to investigate the challenges that screen-based simulation technology poses for collaborative learning. Grounded in Luckin’s ecology of resources framework (Luckin, 2010) and informed by computer-supported collabora- tive learning (CSCL) research, the study identifies some disadvantages of free collaboration that need to be dealt with for collaboration to be a beneficial technique for ECAS in health care education. The dis- cussion focuses on the use of scripts (Weinberger et al., 2009) to filter the interactions between the learner and the more able partner, supporting the collaborative-learning activity and enhancing learning with ECAS in health care education.

  • 3.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Interaktiva medier och lärande (IML).
    Art Blended Research and Children’s Gender Identity Making2015Ingår i: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 6, nr 22, s. 2333-2350Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The intention with this article is to explore how visuals and written text may combine to further understandings about complex matters such as gendered aspects of the human condition. To do so, I bring together my professional practices as researcher and artist by theorizing, conceptualizing and visualizing aspects of children’s gender identity making. As such, this article is conceptual rather than empirical and covers issues about learning, existentialism, social constructivism, children, identity, and gender. It also exemplifies what I call Art Blended Research, an approach that draws on the insight of that there is more to see than meets the eye. In conclusion, the strength of this approach does not lie in the ability to explain what is. Instead, the strength of Art Blended Research is found in possible explorations and inspirations of what might be.

  • 4.
    Svonni, Charlotta
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    At the Margin of Educational Policy: Sámi/Indigenous Peoples in the Swedish National Curriculum 20112015Ingår i: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 6, nr 9, s. 898-906Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    According to international and national legislation, the Sámi people in Sweden have the right to self-determination; more specifically, they have the right to form their own education. Current compulsory education is guided by the national curricula, Lpo 11. Thus, the curricula heavily in- fluence education in schools throughout the country. In this paper, a content analysis is performed to explore the Lpo 11 from an Indigenous perspective, and it scrutinizes if and how Sámi culture, values, traditions and knowledge are salient in the curricula. The results show that the Sámi the- matic only has a minor place in the Lpo 11. Furthermore, there are no knowledge requirements including the Sámi thematic in the syllabi. In relation to expectations in international conventions and national legislation addressing Indigenous peoples and national minorities, there is a need of a higher degree of the Sámi thematic in the curriculum. 

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