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  • 1.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Nicolo, Dell'Unto
    Lund University.
    Palsson, Gisli
    Umeå University.
    To tree, or not to tree? On the Empirical Basis for Having Past Landscapes to Experience2018In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our intention with this point of view paper is to help refocus an increasingly abstract and theoretically orientated Digital Humanities (DH). We will present a critical perspective on some of the problems and potentials relating to the visualisation of past (primarily non-urban) landscapes, with particular emphasis on the use of empirical evidence, from a combined environmental and archaeological point of view. We will outline some of the major challenges associated with reconstructing past landscapes from data, and give some examples of recent attempts to create platforms for addressing some of these issues. We will also briefly discuss the importance of landscape visualisation in the context of heritage management.

  • 2.
    Drucker, Johanna
    et al.
    University of California at Los Angeles.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The Why and How of Middleware2016In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation, publication and research platforms used for scholarly work in the Digital Humanities embody argument structures that are not always explicitly acknowledged. This article examines these platforms, and their protocols, as "middleware" that includes such purpose-designed projects as Omeka, and Scalar, and general purpose ones such as Drupal and PowerPoint, to ask how they embody rhetorical assumptions at every level of production (from back-end assumptions about what constitutes the smallest unit of discourse, to the front-end modes of presentation and organization of display). It extends the concept of middleware to include physical and social presentation spaces, activities (such as witnessing), to ask how these, also, perform the rhetorical activity of enunciation, positionality, and other discursive modalities.

  • 3.
    Foka, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Arvidsson, Viktor
    Swedish Center for Digital Innovation. Department of Informatics, University of Oslo.
    Experiential Analogies: A Sonic Digital Ekphrasis as a Digital Humanities Project2016In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 10, no 2, article id UNSP 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanistic uses of digital technologies have opened up new ways to think about, communicate, and discuss historical research. The common use of digital tools to visually represent ancient cultures and sites, however, has also introduced new issues. For example, critics have argued that digital visualisations, largely synonymous with reconstruction in 3D models, often attempt to represent a photorealistic-artificial vision of the past, and may often prove to be a way to communicate history to a large(r) audience [Forte and Siliotti 1997]. Against this backdrop, this article will discuss precisely how technology may help immerse researchers into historically situated life, and radically advance historical research. Adding to related criticisms of ocularcentric traditions of knowledge production, we contribute to this stream of research by arguing that contemporary visual representations of the past often concentrate on visual representations and seemingly maintain antiquity as a sanitised historio-cultural ideal [Westin 2012] [Tziovas 2014]. More specifically, this article seeks to demonstrate the potential of digital humanities to move beyond mere representations on screen and to mobilize other senses (specifically sound) as a historically situated component for research. For this purpose, we focus on the abstract principles and overall methodology for a recreation of the experience of sounds in the Roman amphitheatre.

  • 4.
    Lindhé, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    "A visual sense is born in the fingertips": towards a digital ekphrasis2013In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the significance of the rhetorical and modern definitions of ekphrasis will be discussed through the lens of digital literature and art. It attempts to reinscribe the body in ekphrastic practice by adding touch to the abstracted visualism of the eye, and emphasize defining features of the ancient usage: orality, immediacy and tactility. What I call the digital ekphrasis with its emphasis on enargeia, its strong connections with the ancient definition, and on the bodily interaction with the work of art, conveys an aesthetic of tactility; digitalis=finger. By tracing and elucidating a historical trajectory that takes the concept of ekphrasis in the ancient culture as a starting point, the intention is not to reject the theories of the late 1900s, but through a reinterpretation of ekphrasis put forward an example of how digital perspectives on classic concepts could challenge or revise more or less taken-for-granted assumptions in the humanities. In this context 'the digital' is not only a phenomenon that could be tied to certain digital objects or used as a digital tool, but as an approach to history, with strong critical potential. The aim is to show that one of the most important features of our digital culture is that it offers new perspectives – not only on current technology – but also on literary, cultural and aesthetic historical practices.

  • 5.
    Snickars, Pelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Mähler, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    SpotiBot: Turing Testing Spotify2018In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if digitized and born-digital audiovisual material today amounts to a steadily increasing body of data to work with and research, such media modalities are still relatively poorly represented in the field of DH. Streaming media is a case in point, and the purpose of this article is to provide some findings from an ongoing audio (and music) research project, that deals with experiments, interventions and the reverse engineering of Spotify’s algorithms, aggregation procedures, and valuation strategies. One such research experiment, the SpotiBot intervention, was set up at Humlab, Umeå University. Via multiple bots running in parallel our idea was to examine if it is possible to provoke — or even undermine — the Spotify business model (based on the so called “30 second royalty rule”). Essentially, the experiment resembled a Turing test, where we asked ourselves what happens when — not if — streaming bots approximate human listener behavior in such a way that it becomes impossible to distinguish between a human and a machine. Implemented in the Python programming language, and using a web UI testing frameworks, our so called SpotiBot engine automated the Spotify web client by simulating user interaction within the web interface. The SpotiBot engine was instructed to play a single track repeatedly (both self-produced music and Abba’s “Dancing Queen”), during less and more than 30 seconds, and with a fixed repetition scheme running from 100 to n times (simultaneously with different Spotify Free ‘bot accounts’). Our bots also logged all results. In short, our bots demonstrated the ability (at least sometimes) to continuously play tracks, indicating that the Spotify business model can be tampered with. Using a single virtual machine — hidden behind only one proxy IP — the results of the intervention hence stipulate that it is possible to automatically play tracks for thousands of repetitions that exceeds the royalty rule.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Envisioning the Digital Humanities2012In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last couple of years, it has become increasingly clear that the digital humanities is associated with a visionary and forward-looking sentiment, and that the field has come to constitute a site for far-reaching discussions about the future of the field itself as well as the humanities at large. Based on a rich set of materials closely associated with the formation of the digital humanities, this article explores the visions and expectations associated with the digital humanities and how the digital humanities often becomes a laboratory and means for thinking about the state and future of the humanities. It is argued that this forward-looking sentiment comes both from inside and outside the field, and is arguably an important reason for the attraction and importance of the field. Furthermore, the author outlines a visionary scope for the digital humanities and offers a personal visionary statement as the endpoint to the article series.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    From Optical Fiber to Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure2011In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is currently an infrastructure turn with very real implications for the humanities and digital humanities. It comes not only with presumed technology or infrastructure, but also with certain assumptions, discursive patterns, and models. This paper analyzes these critically and advocates a humanities-based notion of cyberinfrastructure, not necessarily built on a science-and-engineering paradigm or exclusively grounded in existing humanities infrastructure. It is argued that we need to maintain a critical stance while simultaneously engaging in the exploration of research issues and technologies. There is often a gap between the material details of infrastructure and underlying, foundational ideas, and it is suggested that a model based on conceptual cyberinfrastructure and design parameters can be one way of connecting the ideational level with actual implementation. HUMlab at Umeå University serves as a case study.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    From Optical Fibre to Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure2011In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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