umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alghadir, A. H.
    et al.
    Anwer, S.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia ; Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Al-Eisa, E. S.
    Effect of quadriceps and hamstrings muscle cooling on standing balance in healthy young men2017In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 176-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The present study compared the effect of quadriceps and hamstring muscle cooling on standing balance in healthy young men.

    Methods: Thirty healthy young men (18-30 years) participated in the study. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups (n=10 each): quadriceps cooling (QC), hamstring cooling (HC), or control group (no cooling). Participants in the QC and HC groups received 20 minutes of cooling using a cold pack (gel pack), placed on the anterior thigh (from the apex of the patella to the mid-thigh) and the posterior thigh (from the base of the popliteal fossa to the mid-thigh), respectively. Balance score including unilateral stance was measured at baseline and immediately after the application of the cold pack.

    Results: No significant difference in the balance score was noted in any group after the application of the cold pack (p>0.05). Similarly, no significant differences in post-test balance score were noted among the three groups (p>0.05).

    Conclusions: Cooling of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles has no immediate effect on standing balance in healthy young men. However, longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate the long-term effects of cooling these muscles on standing balance.

  • 2.
    Backman, Ludvig
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Andersson, Gustav
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Wennstig, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy: peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes2011In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 133-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established modelfor Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in thetendon. 

    Methods: Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercisedcontrols. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed.

    Results: EIA revealedincreased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in thecontrols (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statisticallysignificant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptorwas also found on tenocytes.

    Conclusions: Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This showsthat increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise,as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends wereobserved in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  • 3.
    Lerner, Ulf H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Osteotropic effects by the neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide2008In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunohistochemical phenotypic characterization of skeletal nerve fibers has demonstrated the expression of a restricted number of neuropeptides, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). According to the neuro-osteological hypothesis, such neuropeptides can be released and exert paracrine biological effects on bone cells present close to the nerve endings expressing these signaling molecules. The existence of such interplay is most convincingly shown by the hypothalamic control of bone formation, in the case of leptin stimulation of hypothalamic nuclei mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and inhibitory beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts. In addition to these receptors, osteoblasts and osteoclasts express functional receptors for CGRP, SP and VIP, which can regulate both bone formation and bone resorption. The evidence for these observations is summarized in the present paper.

  • 4.
    Scott, A
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, and Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver.
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Abraham, T
    James Hogg Research Centre-St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver;.
    Fong, G
    University of British Columbia, and Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver.
    Sampaio, A V
    University of British Columbia.
    Underhill, T M
    University of British Columbia.
    Mechanical force modulates scleraxis expression in bioartificial tendons2011In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following tendon injury, cartilage, bone and fat metaplasia are often observed, making the optimization of tenocyte differentiation an important clinical goal. In this study we examined the effect of static and cyclic mechanical loading on the expression of genes which play a role in tenocyte differentiation and function, namely scleraxis (Scx) and Type I collagen (Col1a1), and determined the effect of varying mechanical parameters including (1) static vs dynamic load, (2) increasing strain magnitude, (3) inclusion of 10 s rest periods, and (4) increasing cycle number. Cyclic loading resulted in a greater increase of tenocyte gene expression than static loading over 3 weeks in culture. Increasing strain levels potentiated the induction of tenocyte genes. The insertion of a 10 s rest periods further enhanced tenocyte gene expression, as did increasing repetition numbers. These results suggest that mechanical signaling exerts an important influence on the expression of genes which play a role in determining the tendon phenotype. Further work is required to confirm and extend these findings in primary cells such as resident tendon progenitor/stem cells, in order to provide an improved understanding of biology from which optimized rehabilitation programs can be developed.

  • 5.
    Spang, Christoph
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. 2Dr. Alfen, Orthopaedic Spine Center, Wuerzburg, Germany.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports medicine. ISEH, University College London Hospitals, UK; Pure Sports Medicine Clinic, London, UK.
    Richly innervated soft tissues covering the superficial aspect of the extensor origin in patients with chronic painful tennis elbow - Implication for treatment?2017In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tennis elbow is difficult to treat. The results of surgical treatments are not convincing. Treatment studies on Achilles and patellar tendinopathy targeting the richly innervated and vascularized soft tissues outside the tendon have shown promising outcomes. The innervation patterns in the fibrous/fatty tissues superficially to the elbow extensor origin have not been clarified.

    Methods: Nine tissue specimens from the fibrous/fatty tissue covering the extensor origin was taken from seven patients (mean age: 45 years) undergoing surgical treatment for chronic painful tennis elbow. The specimens were stained for morphology (haematoxylin & eosin, H&E) and immunohistochemically for general nerve marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and markers for sympathetic (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH) and sensory nerve fibres (calcitonin gene-related peptide, CGRP).

    Results: All specimens contained multiple blood vessels and nerve structures indicated by morphology and immunoreactions. There was a frequent occurrence of TH reactions, especially peri-vascularly, but also in nerve fascicles. Immunoreactions for CGRP were seen in nerve fascicles and isolated nerve fibres.

    Conclusion: The results provide new information on the innervation patterns of the superficial tissues of the extensor origin and their potential as source of tennis elbow pain. Level of Evidence: IV.

  • 6.
    Spang, Christoph
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Harandi, Vahid M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Alfredsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Pure Sports Medicine Clinic, London, UK; ISEH, UCLH, London, UK.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy2015In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 197-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Methods: Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. Results: A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. Conclusion: New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy

  • 7.
    Spang, Christoph
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Dr. Alfen Orthopaedic Spine Center, Würzburg, Germany.
    Renström, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports medicine. Pure Sports Medicine Clinic, London, UK ; ISEH, UCLH, London, UK.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Marked expression of TNF receptors in human peritendinous tissues including in nerve fascicles with axonal damage: Studies on tendinopathy and tennis elbow2017In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 226-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The peritendinous connective tissues can have importance in chronic tendon pain. Recently cytokine TNF-alpha has been suggested to be involved in tendinopathic processes. It is not known how TNF-alpha and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 are expressed in peritendinous tissues.

    Methods: The objective for this study was to immunohistochemically evaluate the expression patterns of these in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons and the one located superficially to the extensor origin at the elbow region for patients with tendinopathy/tennis elbow.

    Results: The nerve fascicles were of two types, one type being homogenously stained for the nerve markers beta III-tubulin and neurofilament and the other showing deficits for these suggesting features of axonal damage. Much more distinct TNFR1/TNFR2 immunoreactions were seen for the latter nerve fascicles. TNFR1 was seen in axons, TNFR2 mainly in Schwann cells. TNFR1 and particularly TNFR2 were seen in walls of parts of blood vessels. The dispersed cells showed frequently TNFR1 and TNFR2 immunoreactivity.

    Discussion: These findings suggest that TNF-alpha can be related to degenerative events but also attempts for healing concerning the nerve structures. The marked expression of the TNF-alpha system in the peritendinous tissue suggests an impact of TNF-alpha in tendinopathy/tennis elbow.

  • 8.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Alghadir, A. H.
    Iqbal, Z. A.
    Effect of different head-neck-jaw postures on cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense2017In: Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - JMNI, ISSN 1108-7161, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 341-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of different induced head-neck-jaw postures on head-neck relocation error among healthy subjects.

    Methods: 30 healthy adult male subjects participated in this study. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense was measured while standing, habitual sitting, habitual sitting with clenched jaw and habitual sitting with forward head posture during right rotation, left rotation, flexion and extension using kinesthetic sensibility test.

    Results: Head-neck relocation error was least while standing, followed by habitual sitting, habitual sitting with forward head posture and habitual sitting with jaw clenched. However, there was no significant difference in error between different tested postures during all the movements.

    Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to see the effect of different induced head-neck-jaw postures on head-neck position sense among healthy subjects. Assuming a posture for a short duration of time doesn’t affect head-neck relocation error in normal healthy subjects.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf