umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ann-Kristin, Bergquist
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Kristina, Söderholm
    Sustainable Energy Transition: the Case of the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry 1973-19902016In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 1179-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By employing historical case study methodology, this paper examines the transition towards renewable energy and increased energy efficiency in the Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) during the 1970s and 1980s. Between 1973 and 1990, CO2 emissions were cut by 80 % in this sector, and this was mainly achieved by substituting away from oil to biofuels in the form of byproducts from the pulp manufacturing process. The CO2 reduction was also a result of energy efficiency improvements and increased internal production of electricity through back-pressure turbine power generation. Sweden was highly dependent on oil at the advent of the first Oil Crisis in 1973, and the increased oil prices put pressure on the Swedish government and the energy-intensive PPI to reduce this oil dependency. Of central importance for the energy transition was the highly collaborative strategy of the PPI, both internally among pulp mills as well as between the sector as a whole and the corporatist Swedish state administration. The Swedish government chose a proactive strategy by emphasizing knowledge management and collaboration with the industry along with the substitution of internal biofuels for oil. The transition was also characterized by a strong focus on unutilized potentials in the PPI; a previous waste problem now could be transformed into energy savings and improved energy efficiency. Energy taxes and fees also played an important role in Swedish energy policy during the 1970s and the 1980s. All in all, the study illustrates the central role of governments and their ability to push industrial sectors into new technological pathways through a wide palette of mutually reinforcing policy instruments. The results further point at the importance of a more holistic understanding of the interplay between different policies and their impacts in the longer run.

  • 2.
    Brembilla, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Vuolle, Mika
    EQUA simualtion.
    Östin, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Practical support for evaluating efficiency factors of a space heating system in cold climates: modelling and simulation of hydronic panel radiator with different location of connection pipes2017In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1253-1267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plenty of technical norms, included in the EPBD umbrella, assess the performance of buildings or its sub-systems in terms of efficiency. In particular, EN 15316 and its sub-sections, determine the system energy requirements and the system efficiencies of space heating system. This paper focuses on the estimation of efficiencies for emission of hydronic radiators. The assessment of efficiencies for emission occurs by evaluating the amount of heat emitted  from the heat emitter and the extra thermal losses towards building envelope. The heat emitted from radiators varies during the heating up/cooling down phases. A factor that influences the heat emitted during these phases is the location of connection pipes of the radiator. Connection pipes can be located on opposite side or at the same side of the radiator. To better estimate the heat emitted from radiators a transient model with multiple storage elements is used in a building simulation model. Sensitivity analysis encompasses all  the possible variations on extra thermal losses due to the building location in different climates, the heaviness of active thermal mass and the type of radiator local control. The final outcome of this paper is a practical support where the designer can easily assess the efficiencies for emission of hydronic radiators  for Swedish buildings. As main result, (i) the efficiency for control of space heating system is higher in Northern climates than in Southern climates, (ii) heavy active thermal masses allow higher efficiencies for emission than light active thermal masses, (iii) connection pipes located on the same side of the radiator enable higher efficiencies for emission than pipes located on opposite side.

  • 3.
    Brembilla, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Östin, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Soleimani-Mohseni, Mohsen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Paradoxes in understanding the Efficiency Factors of Space Heating2019In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficiency factors are here defined as the thermal energy performance indicators of the space heating. Until recently, the efficiency factors were assumed as one value for space heating located in any climate. This study addresses the problem of how the outdoor climate affects the efficiency factors of a space heating equipped with 1D model of hydronic floor heating. The findings show how the efficiency factors, computed with two numerical methods, are correlated with the solar radiation. This study highlights the paradoxes in understanding the results of efficiency factors analysis. This work suggests how to interpret and use the efficiency factors as a benchmark performance indicator.

  • 4. Moberg, Karen R.
    et al.
    Aall, Carlo
    Western Norway Research Institute, Sogndal, Norway.
    Dorner, Florian
    Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Ceron, Jean-Paul
    Centre International de Recherche sur l’Environnement et le Développement, Paris, France.
    Sköld, Bore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU), School of Business, Management and Economics, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK; Center for Energy Technologies, Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Piana, Valentino
    Economics Web Institute, Monterotondo, Italy.
    Mobility, food and housing: responsibility, individual consumption and demand-side policies in European deep decarbonisation pathways2019In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 497-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Brundtland Commission report ‘Our Common Future’ highlighted that residents in high-income countries lead lifestyles incompatible with planetary boundaries. Three decades later, consumption-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have continued to increase. To achieve ‘well below 2°C’ and 1.5 °C goals, consumption-related emissions must be substantially reduced in the coming decades. This paper provides insights on how to pursue 1.5 °C pathways through changes in household consumption. It draws on original data gathered in the project ‘HOusehold Preferences for reducing greenhouse gas Emissions in four European High Income Countries’ (HOPE) to analyse policies targeting and affecting direct and indirect GHG emissions in three household consumption categories (mobility, housing and food) in four countries (France, Germany, Norway and Sweden) and four medium-sized cities. This paper demonstrates discrepancies and similarities between current governmental policy approaches in the four countries and household perceptions of consumption changes with respect to policy mechanisms, responsibilities and space for acting on mitigation. Current demand-side policy strategies rely heavily on instruments of self-governance and nudging behaviour. Whilst some of our data suggests that households broadly accept this, it also suggests that governments could more actively lead and steer demand-side mitigation via adjusting and supplementing a comprehensive list of 20 climate policy measures currently in place in one or more of the case countries. The paper concludes by suggesting areas for more effective policy change and household-level climate change mitigation to feed the next update of climate pledges under the Paris Agreement.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf