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  • 1. Allocca, Giancarlo
    et al.
    Ma, Sherie
    Martelli, Davide
    Cerri, Matteo
    Del Vecchio, Flavia
    Bastianini, Stefano
    Zoccoli, Giovanna
    Amici, Roberto
    Morairty, Stephen R.
    Aulsebrook, Anne E.
    Blackburn, Shaun
    Lesku, John A.
    Rattenborg, Niels C.
    Vyssotski, Alexei L.
    Wams, Emma
    Porcherer, Kate
    Wulff, Katharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Centre for Molecular Medicine (WCMM), Umeå University, Sweden.
    Foster, Russell
    Chan, Julia K. M.
    Nicholas, Christian L.
    Freestone, Dean R.
    Johnston, Leigh A.
    Gundlachla, Andrew L.
    Validation of 'Somnivore', a Machine Learning Algorithm for Automated Scoring and Analysis of Polysomnography Data2019In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 13, article id 207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual scoring of polysomnography data is labor-intensive and time-consuming, and most existing software does not account for subjective differences and user variability. Therefore, we evaluated a supervised machine learning algorithm, Somnivore (TM), for automated wake-sleep stage classification. We designed an algorithm that extracts features from various input channels, following a brief session of manual scoring, and provides automated wake-sleep stage classification for each recording. For algorithm validation, polysomnography data was obtained from independent laboratories, and include normal, cognitively-impaired, and alcohol-treated human subjects (total n = 52), narcoleptic mice and drug-treated rats (total n = 56), and pigeons (n = 5). Training and testing sets for validation were previously scored manually by 1-2 trained sleep technologists from each laboratory. F-measure was used to assess precision and sensitivity for statistical analysis of classifier output and human scorer agreement. The algorithm gave high concordance with manual visual scoring across all human data (wake 0.91 +/- 0.01; N1 0.57 +/- 0.01; N2 0.81 +/- 0.01; N3 0.86 +/- 0.01; REM 0.87 +/- 0.01), which was comparable to manual inter-scorer agreement on all stages. Similarly, high concordance was observed across all rodent (wake 0.95 +/- 0.01; NREM 0.94 +/- 0.01; REM 0.91 +/- 0.01) and pigeon (wake 0.96 +/- 0.006; NREM 0.97 +/- 0.01; REM 0.86 +/- 0.02) data. Effects of classifier learning from single signal inputs, simple stage reclassification, automated removal of transition epochs, and training set size were also examined. In summary, we have developed a polysomnography analysis program for automated sleep-stage classification of data from diverse species. Somnivore enables flexible, accurate, and high-throughput analysis of experimental and clinical sleep studies.

  • 2.
    Alstermark, Bror
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Pettersson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Endogenous plasticity in neuro-rehabilitation following partial spinal cord lesions2014In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 8, p. 59-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, much interest in neuro-rehabilitation is focused on mechanisms related to axonal outgrowth and formation of new circuits although still little is known about the functionality in motor behavior. This is a highly exciting avenue of research and most important to consider when dealing with large lesions. Here, we address endogenous mechanisms with the potential of modifying the function of already existing spinal circuits via associative plasticity. We forward a hypothesis based on experimental findings suggesting that potentiation of synaptic transmission in un-injured pathways can be monitored and adjusted by a Cerebellar loop involving the Reticulospinal, Rubrospinal and Corticospinal tracts and spinal interneurons with projection to motoneurons. This mechanism could be of relevance when lesions are less extensive and the integrity of the neural circuits remains in part. Endogenous plasticity in the spinal cord could be of clinical importance if stimulated in an adequate manner, e.g., by using optimal training protocols.

  • 3.
    Ekman, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Domellöf, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Longitudinal changes in task-evoked brain responses in Parkinson's disease patients with and without mild cognitive impairment2014In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 8, article id 207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive deficits are common in Parkinson's disease. Previous cross-sectional research has demonstrated a link between cognitive impairments and fronto-striatal dopaminergic dysmodulation. However, longitudinal studies that link disease progression with altered task-evoked brain activity are lacking. Therefore, our objective was to longitudinally evaluate working-memory related brain activity changes in Parkinson's disease patients with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Patients were recruited within a longitudinal cohort study of incident patients with idiopathic parkinsonism. We longitudinally (at baseline examination and at 12-months follow-up) compared 28 patients with Parkinson's disease without MCI with 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and MCI. Functional MRI blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured during a verbal two-back working-memory task. Patients with MCI under-recruited bilateral medial prefrontal cortex at both time-points (main effect of group: p < 0.001, uncorrected). Critically, a significant group-by-time interaction effect (p < 0.001, uncorrected) was found in the right fusiform gyrus, indicating that working-memory related activity decreased for patients with Parkinson's disease and MCI between baseline and follow-up, while patients without MCI were stable across time-points. The functional connectivity between right fusiform gyrus and bilateral caudate nucleus was stronger for patients without MCI relative to patients with MCI. Our findings support the view that deficits in working-memory updating are related to persistent fronto-striatal under-recruitments in patients with early phase Parkinson's disease and MCI. The longitudinal evolution of MCI in Parkinson's disease translates into additional task-evoked posterior cortical changes.

  • 4.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.
    Fan, Chun Chieh
    McEvoy, Linda K.
    Holland, Dominic
    Tan, Chin Hong
    Chen, Chi-Hua
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Desikan, Rahul S.
    Dale, Anders M.
    Combining Polygenic Hazard Score With Volumetric MRI and Cognitive Measures Improves Prediction of Progression From Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease2018In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 12, article id 260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved prediction of progression to Alzheimer's Disease (AD) among older individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is of high clinical and societal importance. We recently developed a polygenic hazard score (PHS) that predicted age of AD onset above and beyond APOE. Here, we used data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to further explore the potential clinical utility of PHS for predicting AD development in older adults with MCI. We examined the predictive value of PHS alone and in combination with baseline structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data on performance on the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE). In survival analyses, PHS significantly predicted time to progression from MCI to AD over 120 months (p = 1.07e-5), and PHS was significantly more predictive than APOE alone (p = 0.015). Combining PHS with baseline brain atrophy score and/or MMSE score significantly improved prediction compared to models without PHS (three-factor model p = 4.28e-17). Prediction model accuracies, sensitivities and area under the curve were also improved by including PHS in the model, compared to only using atrophy score and MMSE. Further, using linear mixed-effect modeling, PHS improved the prediction of change in the Clinical Dementia Rating—Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) score and MMSE over 36 months in patients with MCI at baseline, beyond both APOE and baseline levels of brain atrophy. These results illustrate the potential clinical utility of PHS for assessment of risk for AD progression among individuals with MCI both alone, or in conjunction with clinical measures of prodromal disease including measures of cognitive function and regional brain atrophy.

  • 5.
    Madison, Guy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schiölde, Gunilla
    Repeated Listening Increases the Liking for Music Regardless of Its Complexity: Implications for the Appreciation and Aesthetics of Music2017In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 11, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological and aesthetic theories predict that music is appreciated at optimal, peak levels of familiarity and complexity, and that appreciation of music exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with familiarity as well as complexity. Because increased familiarity conceivably leads to improved processing and less perceived complexity, we test whether there is an interaction between familiarity and complexity. Specifically, increased familiarity should render the music subjectively less complex, and therefore move the apex of the U curve toward greater complexity. A naturalistic listening experiment was conducted, featuring 40 music examples (ME) divided by experts into 4 levels of complexity prior to the main experiment. The MEs were presented 28 times each across a period of approximately 4 weeks, and individual ratings were assessed throughout the experiment. Ratings of liking increased monotonically with repeated listening at all levels of complexity; both the simplest and the most complex MEs were liked more as a function of listening time, without any indication of a U-shaped relation. Although the MEs were previously unknown to the participants, the strongest predictor of liking was familiarity in terms of having listened to similar music before, i.e., familiarity with musical style. We conclude that familiarity is the single most important variable for explaining differences in liking among music, regardless of the complexity of the music.

  • 6.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Dancing combines the essence for successful aging2012In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, no 6, p. 155-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anton
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Multimodal Sensory Stimulation of the Masseter Muscle Reduced Precision but Not Accuracy of Jaw-Opening Movements2019In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 13, article id 1083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A functional integration between the trigeminal and craniocervical sensorimotor systems has been demonstrated, with simultaneous jaw and head-neck movements during jaw opening-closing. We previously showed that pain induction in the masseter muscle increased the relative contribution of the neck component of integrated jaw-neck movements. Induced pain or manipulation of proprioception by vibration did not affect accuracy during a jaw-opening task in men. It is not known how multimodal sensory stimulation, with a combination of pain induction and vibration, affects jaw-opening accuracy and precision. The aim was to investigate how jaw-neck movements, and specifically accuracy and precision of jaw-opening, are affected during concomitant nociceptive and proprioceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle. Twenty-one healthy men performed jaw-opening to a target position, defined as 75% of individual maximum jaw opening, during control (Ctr), vibration of masseter muscles (Vib), pain induction in the masseter (Pain), and concomitant vibration and pain induction in the masseter muscle (VibPain). Simultaneous jaw and head movements were recorded with an optoelectronic system and amplitudes calculated for each jaw opening-closing cycle. Accuracy of jaw movements was defined as the achievement of the target position. Precision of jaw movements was defined as the cycle-to-cycle variability from the mean of cycles 2-10 (coefficient of variation, CV). Differences between the trials were analyzed with Friedman's test, Dunn's test, and Benjamini-Hochberg correction. There were no significant differences between the trials for jaw movement amplitudes. For head movements, amplitudes for cycles 2-10 were larger during Pain compared to Ctr and Vib (both p = 0.034), and larger during VibPain compared to Ctr (p = 0.034) and Vib (p = 0.035). There were no differences in accuracy of jaw movements between the trials. For precision of jaw movements, the cycle-to-cycle variability was larger during VibPain compared to Ctr (p = 0.027) and Vib (p = 0.018). For integrated jaw-neck motor strategy, there was a difference between pain and non-pain trials, but no differences between unimodal and multimodal stimulation trials. For achievement of jaw-opening to a target position, the results show no effect on accuracy, but a reduced precision of jaw movements during combined proprioceptive and nociceptive multimodal stimulation.

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