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  • 1.
    Adhikari, Deepak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Flohr, Gilian
    Hogeschool Leiden, Zernikedreef 11,2333 CK Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Gorre, Nagaraju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yang, Hairu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lan, Zijian
    University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Disruption of Tsc2 in oocytes leads to overactivation of the entire pool of primordial follicles2009In: Molecular human reproduction, ISSN 1360-9947, E-ISSN 1460-2407, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To maintain the length of reproductive life in a woman, it is essential that most of her ovarian primordial follicles are maintained in a quiescent state to provide a continuous supply of oocytes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control the quiescence and activation of primordial follicles is still in its infancy. In this study, we provide some genetic evidence to show that the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (Tsc2), which negatively regulates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), functions in oocytes to maintain the dormancy of primordial follicles. In mutant mice lacking the Tsc2 gene in oocytes, the pool of primordial follicles is activated prematurely due to elevated mTORC1 activity in oocytes. This results in depletion of follicles in early adulthood, causing premature ovarian failure (POF). Our results suggest that the Tsc1-Tsc2 complex mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity is indispensable for maintenance of the dormancy of primordial follicles, thus preserving the follicular pool, and that mTORC1 activity in oocytes promotes follicular activation. Our results also indicate that deregulation of Tsc/mTOR signaling in oocytes may cause pathological conditions of the ovary such as infertility and POF.

  • 2.
    Hosokawa, K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ottander, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wahlberg, P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Cajander, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Jan I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Dominant expression and distribution of oestrogen receptor beta over oestrogen receptor alpha in the human corpus luteum2001In: Molecular human reproduction, ISSN 1360-9947, E-ISSN 1460-2407, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the potential importance of oestrogen as a local regulator of human corpus luteum function, the mRNA expression pattern and cellular localization of oestrogen receptors (ERs), ER-alpha and ER-beta, were studied in corpora lutea grouped according to age, where days 2-5 post-LH rise were designated as the early luteal phase, days 6-10 as mid-luteal and days 11-14 as the late luteal phase respectively. Northern blot analysis using an ER-beta probe in samples from whole ovarian tissue and isolated corpora lutea, revealed a major band at 7.5 kb and several minor bands between 4-10 kb, while no signals for ER-alpha mRNA were obtained. However, using a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction followed by Southern blotting, ER-beta mRNA levels were found to be 63% lower (P: < 0.05, n = 39) in the mid-luteal phase compared with the early luteal phase, while ER-alpha mRNA expression showed no statistical differences between the different age groups. Using in-situ hybridization, ER-beta mRNA expression was localized to the steroidogenic luteal cells as well as perivascular cells and fibroblasts in the corpus luteum. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the localization of ER-beta protein, but no clear staining of luteal cells was found using antibodies against ER-alpha. Collectively, the findings of low to moderate expression of ER-beta mRNA and protein in the steroidogenic cells, and also in vascular endothelial cells of the corpus luteum, as opposed to diminutive amounts of ER-alpha mRNA, suggest that oestrogen activity is primarily transduced via ER-beta in the human corpus luteum.

  • 3.
    Ottander, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Leung, Constant HB
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Olofsson, Jan I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Functional evidence for divergent receptor activation mechanisms of luteotrophic and luteolytic events in the human corpus luteum1999In: Molecular human reproduction, ISSN 1360-9947, E-ISSN 1460-2407, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 391-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a dispersed human luteal cell culture model, progesterone synthesis following treatment by incremental doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and the stable prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) analogue cloprostenol, alone or in combination, was related to corpora lutea (CL) mRNA transcript abundance coding for the luteinizing hormone (LH)/HCG receptor (LH-R) and PGF2alpha-receptor (FP) by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 33 otherwise healthy women, scheduled for surgery due to benign conditions. CL were grouped according to age, based on the occurrence of a preovulatory LH surge where post-LH days 2-5 were designated as early luteal phase, days 6-10 as mid-luteal phase and days 11-14 as late luteal phase. When exposed to HCG, maximal progesterone output was raised 2.2-fold (P = 0.08, n = 5) compared with untreated controls in the early CL, while it increased 5.7- and 4.6-fold in the mid- and late groups respectively (P<0.05, n = 4 mid-luteal phase, n = 3 late luteal phase). This stimulation pattern was found to be concordant with the value of mRNA coding for LH-R in all groups (n = 6 early luteal phase, n = 5 mid-luteal phase, n = 6 late luteal phase). The integrated response to HCG and cloprostenol showed a dose-dependent 60% inhibition of progesterone production; but only in late luteal phase luteal cells (P<0.01, n = 3). FP mRNA values were lowest in early luteal phase, and increased with the age of the CL. Interestingly, lowest CL tissue concentrations of the natural FP agonist PGF2alpha were found during mid-luteal phase while it increased again 1.6-fold during late luteal phase (P<0.05, n = 8 versus mid-luteal phase, n = 6). Collectively, these data demonstrate that (i) the extrinsic functional control (or rescue of CL in the event of pregnancy) occurs when the sensitivity towards LH/HCG is maximal; and (ii) the demise of CL function is mediated via an acquisition of sensitivity towards the intrinsic luteolytic signal, PGF2alpha in the ageing CL.

  • 4. Tirado-Gonzalez, Irene
    et al.
    Freitag, Nancy
    Barrientos, Gabriela
    Shaikly, Valerie
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Strand, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kjellberg, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Klapp, Burghard F.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cohen, Marie
    Blois, Sandra M.
    Galectin-1 influences trophoblast immune evasion and emerges as a predictive factor for the outcome of pregnancy2013In: Molecular human reproduction, ISSN 1360-9947, E-ISSN 1460-2407, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galectin-1 (gal-1) is expressed at the feto-maternal interface and plays a role in regulating the maternal immune response against placental alloantigens, contributing to pregnancy maintenance. Both decidua and placenta contribute to gal-1 expression and may be important for the maternal immune regulation. The expression of gal-1 within the placenta is considered relevant to cell-adhesion and invasion of trophoblasts, but the role of gal-1 in the immune evasion machinery exhibited by trophoblast cells remains to be elucidated. In this study, we analyzed gal-1 expression in preimplantation human embryos and first-trimester decidua-placenta specimens and serum gal-1 levels to investigate the physiological role played by this lectin during pregnancy. The effect on human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) expression in response to stimulation or silencing of gal-1 was also determined in the human invasive, proliferative extravillous cytotrophoblast 65 (HIPEC65) cell line. Compared with normal pregnant women, circulating gal-1 levels were significantly decreased in patients who subsequently suffered a miscarriage. Human embryos undergoing preimplantation development expressed gal-1 on the trophectoderm and inner cell mass. Furthermore, our in vitro experiments showed that exogenous gal-1 positively regulated the membrane-bound HLA-G isoforms (HLA-G1 and G2) in HIPEC65 cells, whereas endogenous gal-1 also induced expression of the soluble isoforms (HLA-G5 and -G6). Our results suggest that gal-1 plays a key role in pregnancy maternal immune regulation by modulating HLA-G expression on trophoblast cells. Circulating gal-1 levels could serve as a predictive factor for pregnancy success in early human gestation.

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