umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Communication barriers in an interorganizational ERP-project2016In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 214-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze communication patterns and bridging activities to be able to describe communication barriers in an interorganizational enterprise resource planning (ERP) project and some ways to overcome those.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical arena was an interorganizational ERP-project, which implemented an On-Premise ERP-system. The goal for the team, assembled from both the buyer and supplier, was to implement an ERP-system, with a fixed price calculated from the expected resources and time needed, half a year. Participant observations, complementary interviews and documentation studies were accomplished, to be able to find and describe communication barriers for organizational development.

    Findings – Communication barriers were found, such as technnological concerns, micro-level discussions, limited bridging activities and openness to change.

    Research limitations/implications – The present study, concerning one single, interorganizational ERP-project provides a starting point for further research concerning communication barriers in ERP-projects.

    Further research could look at the implications communication barriers could have for the buyer and supplier organization in a long term. Practical implications – In managerial implications, some ways to overcome those barriers are discussed.

    Originality/value – Communication barriers found, and their impact on knowledge development within interorganizational ERP-projects, is described. The paper offers a starting point for future research concerning communication barriers. Results could be used of managers to understand communication barriers and their implications for knowledge development and organizational change.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Contracted ERP projects: sequential progress, mutual learning, relationships, control and conflicts2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 458-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the sequential nature that enterprise resource planning (ERP) projects tend to take and to describe how the buyer typically behaves concerning the need for control and learning in and in-between ERP projects.

    Design/methodology/approach – Results come from an in-depth case study of sequential ERP projects. The respondents were a major Swedish retailer and a supplier who undertook upgrading of an ERP system with six separate and sequential projects. The research was framed by independent pre- and post-interviews in three buyer companies' from different areas of business.

    Findings – Results suggest that success is associated with mutual learning between supplier and buyer organizations that lead to reasonably amicable working relationships. Control considerations run through these projects and conflicts appear minimal in the sequential treatment. Insightful interpretation comes not only from empirical reflection on interactions in an in-depth case study, but also from concepts available in decision making and project marketing as well.

    Research limitations/implications – Case studies present in-depth understanding but have generalization limitations. Also the case study was accomplished in Sweden and thus knowledge about behaviour in other countries and cultures is needed.

    Practical implications – Managers investing in relationships and learning in an initial project probably suffer in terms of satisfaction and profitability at that stage but could accomplish more effective, satisfying and profitable situations over time. In particular, appreciation of the nature of the sequential project development, mutual control, delivery and learning in these projects could be useful in understanding the buyer behaviour in ERP projects.

    Originality/value – Learning is important in projects but how do the buyers behave? A description of the sequential nature of ERP projects and the learning process both within the buyer's company and within the supplier's company is established. Tables are created that describe how the gap in the mutual learning process decreases in-between projects in business-to-business projects.

  • 3.
    Biedenbach, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Müller, Ralf
    BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Paradigms in project management research: Examples from 15 years of IRNOP conferences2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the philosophical stances and relatedmethodologies used within the last 15 years of project management research using The InternationalResearch Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) conference papers.Design/methodology/approach – Utilizing a systematic sampling approach, IRNOP conferencepapers from 1994, 2000 and 2007 were analyzed for prevalent philosophical streams in projectmanagement research.Findings – Results show a dominance of ontological subjectivism and epistemologicalinterpretivism, with a preference for case studies and qualitative methods. Trends indicate agrowth of positivist studies and, at the same time, an increase in multi-case studies.Research limitations/implications – This paper’s contribution to knowledge lies in theidentification of predominant research paradigms for research reported at project managementconferences using IRNOP as an example. The study shows trends, preferences, and potential differencesbetween published research and conference papers.Originality/value – Information on the quality, quantity and timely trends of underlyingphilosophies in project management research are lacking an insightful exploration of the projectmanagement research field. This is necessary for a better understanding of the past, present andpossible future of research paradigms in project management. The paper’s findings can be used toimprove the interpretation of the state of knowledge in project management research.

  • 4.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    On productivity in project organizations2009In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 591-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to look at the underlying unit cost considerations in project conduct at the firm level and an established business unit concept is extended to multi-project organizations. The approach and background are described along with apparent implications. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology developed by Gold is extended to cover multi-project organizations. The adaptation of the productivity network is demonstrated using a hypothetical case. Findings – The focus of the paper is on demonstrating an approach. Generally, productivity in an organization is found not to be dictated by a single input, but by the multiplicative outcome of each together. In particular, the number of projects handled each year appears to be of strategic importance in productivity. Research limitations/implications – The paper is conceptual, so applicability depends upon the nature of the particular organization to which it is applied. Implications, of course, will depend upon the degree to which actual data match the model. Practical implications – The approach permits managers to get a handle on productivity in their organizations. It is particularly attractive insofar as it largely depends upon available accounting information for input. This paper seeks to fuel greater interest and debate by practitioners and project management academics about the topic. Originality/value – Although the paper is conceptual, the authors believe that it may among the first to quantitatively treat productivity in multi-project organizations. The approach can be used to understand the productivity as well as some elements of effectiveness of multi-project organizations.

  • 5.
    Burström, Thommie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Organizing boundaries in early phases of product development: The case of an interorganizational vehicle platform project setting2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 697-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe and to summarize a PhD thesis that contributes to the understanding of how boundaries are organized in early phases of new product development. The thesis explores the reality of project member's attempts to create a shared vehicle platform. The author also reports his PhD “journey”.

    Design/methodology/approach – Research reported here is based on a qualitative study through combinations of interviews, observations, and document studies. Data were gathered during three months at two different sites in two different countries. A practice approach was implemented where the daily work activities of project members were studied.

    Findings – It was concluded that organizing of boundaries should be understood as being affected by tensions and characterized by iterations that cross all types of organizational boundaries. The theory of Concurrent Boundary Enactment is therefore proposed as an answer to how the organizing of boundaries should be understood.

    Research limitations/implications – The study shows how project members in parallel organize technologies, structural units, and work processes. Thus, the study focuses on the complexity of organizing boundaries. There is a need to perform more of this type of practice-based, high complexity studies so that more profound organizing patterns can be understood.

    Practical implications – Actors in projects are closely attached to brands' core values. This core value attachment should be seen as both at strength and a weakness. It is seen as strength because core value attachment calls for compassion and dedication. It is seen as weakness since this type of attachment also makes it difficult to create synergies between brands. Therefore, brand managers should try to find least common nominators that bring together dispersed brand value statements.

    Originality/value – By studying multiple boundaries between functions, projects, projects and the permanent organization, projects and steering committees, projects and external organizations, it has been possible to illustrate the everyday complexity which follows by creating a shared vehicle platform between two organizations that compete and collaborate at the same time. Earlier research studies usually only concern one of the boundaries.

  • 6.
    Burström, Thommie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Understanding PMs’ activities in a coopetitive interorganizationalmulti-project setting2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the character of activities performed by projectmanagers (PMs) in the early phases of product development in an interorganizational, multi-projectsetting. The aim is to contribute to the extant literature on boundary work in projects by providing atypology of boundary activities and by presenting a conceptual model in which the relationshipbetween these boundary activities is established.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is based on an explorative, in-depth case study of amulti-project setting where PMs assigned to three projects developed new products whilesimultaneously competing and collaborating. Each project’s concept phase was followed byparticipative observations and ongoing interviews over a 15-week period at two sites and in twocountries.Findings – It is understood that PMs in organizations collaborate and perform balancing activities.These balancing activities are part of a refinement process, which is created through three intertwineddimensions of boundary activities: administrative, sharing, and tuning. These, in turn, are constructedthrough complementary micro activities. These micro activities are politically colored and do notnecessarily follow a prescribed and orderly path; instead, they are situation contingent and iterative in their character.

    Research limitations/implications – The character of boundary activities in coopetitive projectsettings should be further studied to better understand the early phases of product development.Practical implications – The political dimension of product development activities in the earlyphases of product development should be acknowledged. By acknowledging the presence of politics,PMs will be more prepared to deal with the complexity and ambiguity that follows when trying tocollaborate and compete simultaneously.

    Originality/value – This paper takes a practice perspective and focuses on what people do ininterorganizational new product development in situations characterised by coopetition.

  • 7.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The Informal Liaison Role of Project Controllers in New Product Development Projects2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 410-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the liaison role of project controllers in new product development (NPD) projects.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a case study of an industrial new product development project. In total, 68 in-depth interviews were conducted and 32 meetings were observed. Using an inductive approach, this paper scrutinizes the roles of three specific individuals – their formal role as project controllers and their informal role as liaisons.

    Findings – The study found that project controllers play a crucial part in the everyday work of projects – both formally and informally. Project controllers undertake important liaison activities that are not a part of their formal roles in which they extend their responsibilities to include informal activities such as peacekeeping, probing, nailing, process implementation and streamlining.

    Practical implications – This paper argues that managers must identify and acknowledge the importance of informal liaisons and liaison activities among project members because such activities are of crucial importance for the facilitation of communication and for work-flow coordination. By viewing the project controller as someone who is “dressing the project in numbers”, the role can be understood as a support function aimed at close interaction and cross-functional learning, rather than a function aimed at distant supervision and control.

    Originality/value – This paper provides important insights into informal aspects of project roles and the everyday work of project controllers.

  • 8.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Transition processes in an interorganizational platform project2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 400-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and understand challenges related to transition processes that occur between projects and the permanent organisation, as well as the outcome of such processes.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on an explorative, in-depth case study of a multi-project setting. The concept phase of three projects was followed by participative observations and ongoing interviews over a fifteen week period at two sites and in two countries. The empirical material was analyzed through a process-orientated approach focusing on daily project activities.

    Findings: Transition processes are characterized by containing operational complexities. These operational complexities demand from project stakeholders to perform multiple translational and transformative activities. The outcome from these activities are for example strategic, operational, and functional fine-tuning, but also attitudinal turnaround.  

    Research limitations/implications: This research is based on an interorganizational vehicle platform project setting. The findings from this study can therefore not with ease be generalized to other settings. However, it is likely that actors in other interorganizational project settings can benefit from the findings since there probably are a multitude of transition processes in such projects as well.

    Practical implications: Managers can learn that it is important to map all related transition processes, analyze the implications that these processes have on the project, and perform a dialog with project members so that the sense of operational complexity and uncertainty can be reduced. This type of action will reduce feelings of frustration and create a sense of readiness to deal with unexpected events.

    Originality/value: First the setting “an interorganizational vehicle platform” is largely understudied, second this paper pinpoints three unique transition processes and thereby contributes to the sparsely researched area of transition processes.

  • 9.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Integrating service practice into project management: a matter of “do or die”?2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 5-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze service management practices within a project management context.

    Design/methodology/approach: This research supporting conceptual developments was both exploratory and qualitative in nature and utilized an in-depth case study of a major product development project.

    Findings: The conceptual framework developed is applied to empirical observations of product development project. Because there is an adequate fit with observations, elements of a service management approach appear to be viable in the description, managing, and control of projects.

    Research limitations/implications: Because the research was built on a case study, one has the limitations common with that approach. Conversely, case studies are acknowledged as useful in the identification of important variables in situations in which there is little control over events in a real-world context.

    Practical implications: Customer satisfaction is a requirement of project organizations, which is an inherent requisite of any service organization. Consequently, one turns to those elements in the practice of service management that lead to best management practices.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes with a practice-based understanding of how project management is based on integrated service practice.

  • 10.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Requirement managers’ roles in industrial, platform development2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 493-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To describe and analyze the role of requirement managers in new product development (NPD) projects.

     

    Method

    This paper is based on a case study of an industrial platform project. Sixty-eight persons were interviewed and project prerequisites and requirement specifications documents were studied. The roles of specific individuals and their formal role as requirement managers are reported.

                         

    Findings

    The requirement manager’s role fulfillment is performed through five major activities described as developing, anchoring, re-organizing, routinizing, and positioning. These activities are essential in order to manage working with a large flagship project.

     

    Practical implications

    This paper argues that functional roles should not be taken for granted. Even though significant efforts may have been performed in order to establish a new function within a project management setting, the process of establishing new work practices is complex. Managers should therefore investigate inter-functional integration on ongoing bases.

     

    Originality/value

    This paper provides important insights into aspects of requirement manager’s ongoing project activities.

  • 11.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The texture of tension: Complexity, uncertaintyand equivocality2018In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 458-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The premise of this paper is that tension exists among participants and parties engaged in projects.  The uniqueness of development virtually assures this.  It is proposed that tensions are a product of the precursors of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality, and an attempt is made to characterize tension as it arises in projects – its genesis and its nature.

     

    Method: An in-depth case study was conducted in a manner in which the contextually sensitive empirical researches for which Nordic studies are known.  Within discussions on the strategy, decision making, intra- and inter-project interdependencies and managing across development sites associated with a flagship project, 77 statements concerning tension were identified for analysis. 

               

    Findings: These statements were analyzed for content to produce a model associating tension with its precursors and the literature on tension. 

     

    Practical implications: A contribution is made to management theory where knowledge about project context is seen as essential in order to understand best practices for project execution and effectiveness.

    Originality/value: Although common, even virtually assured in projects, tension tends to be neglected in successful management.  This study associates the genesis of tension through the underlying contributions of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality.  It is believed to be the first study of its type.

  • 12.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Embracing the drifting environment: The legacy and impact of a Scandinavian Project literature classic2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 695-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and analysis of the legacy of Christensen and Kreiner's (1991) literally classic Projektledning: att leda och lära i en ofullständig värld (Project Management: to manage and learn in an incomplete world).

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a three-step theoretical analysis deduced from the mentioned classic. The first step provides an overview of the content where the core ideas of the book are derived. This is followed by an analysis of the legacy and impact on theory, empirical approaches, and education. Finally, three main takeaways from the book are discussed.

    Findings – In tracking the legacy, the paper analyses, discusses, and illustrates how the Scandinavian approach to projects has evolved. It pinpoints the two core insights of the book; the importance of understanding the impact of the institutional environment on operations, and embracing uncertainty as a natural part of everyday organizational reality. Based on these insights it is shown how the book has expanded the theoretical contributions towards a focus on temporary organisations and everyday practice, how it has helped to make situated empirical research matter, and how it has influenced education to deal with real-life project challenges.

    Research limitations/implications – This paper investigates a book available only in the Scandinavian language and thus only available for a Scandinavian research community. As such the review is written from a Scandinavian perspective, with the limitations in terms of objectivity to the book that follow from that.

    Practical implications – The main lessons discussed in relation to the heritage from the book are: an increased focus on the details of organizing, situated multi-level case-studies, and situation-sensitive teaching methodologies. The paper argues that an increased understanding of projects should start with a detailed multi-level analysis of temporary organizing to provide a sound foundation on which to base future research and teaching.

    Originality/value – The paper provides an understanding of the origins and diffusion of underpinning ideas of the Scandinavian approach to project management.

  • 13.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Coping with lack of authority Extending research on project governance with a practice approach2017In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 244-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore alternative coping strategies that may compensate for the limitations of weak governance structure in a product development project. Design/methodology/approach - The findings are based on a single case study, including interviews and documents, of a product development project that consists of two interlinked projects in a large multinational company. Findings - Two distinct procedures are identified to cope and manage effectively when there are weak project governance structures. The first procedure is a horizontal process of operational consensus-seeking where conflicts between projects are negotiated and resolved through communication between independent actors such as two project managers who are at the same hierarchical level within the same organization. The second process is a vertical process of strategic escalation where issues that have failed to be resolved are shifted upwards to a new hierarchical level where a new round of operational consensus-seeking is attempted. Research limitations/implications - This paper complements the existing understanding of project governance with a project-as-practice perspective. Based on the findings the authors suggest that project governance needs to be nuanced in its understanding since a too-structured approach may in fact increase tensions in an organization. Practical implications - Practical insights include how organizations may work with its project governance structures in order to avoid tensions. The authors suggest that, in particular, politically sensitive situations may be avoided by weak rather than strong governance structures. Social implications - The authors find that weak governance structures may be efficient for the organization, but harmful to personnel, who become too focused on the task at hand. Originality/value - To the best of the authors' knowledge very little research has been attributed to project governance from a practice approach. Moreover, most attention has been given to strong structures, thereby not examining the positive implications of weak structures.

  • 14.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    How do you do?: On situating old project sites through practice-based studies2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 335-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this editorial is to reflect on the growing interest of situated project research.

    Design/methodology/approach – The editorial is conceptual and relies on published work and the articles included in the special issue.

    Findings – With this special issue it is found that practice-based studies, also called Projects-as-Practice studies, interested in the everyday activities of project practitioners, are multi-faceted and rich. What may also be seen is that practice-based studies are not yet a coherent area. However, it is more important that practice-based studies allow researchers to understand the organization less as an entity and more as a socially-accomplished task.

    Research limitations/implications – Several implications for research are offered, including the need for studies that emphasize the small details of organizing, and that practice-based studies are not restricted to a certain methodology but depend on what a particular paper tries to accomplish.

    Practical implications – With an ever-growing stream of research focusing on projects the guest editors argue that it is about time to look into the details of organizing. This could be accomplished through a number of ways but in this special issue it is proposed that approaching traditional areas with a conscious naivety when asking the questions may do it. For the practitioner, the special issue offers important insights into how things are done in practice, which may be used as a mirror or reflection upon their own practice.

    Originality/value – This editorial and special issue offer insights for any academic interested in understanding projects differently.

  • 15.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Relevance Lost! : A Critical Review of Project Management Standardisation2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 457-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to critically analyze the consequences of the diffusion of generic project management knowledge.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper is conceptual in its nature, using short examples of four different areas (education, research, certification and practice) to show the diffusion of project management knowledge throughout these areas.

    Findings – In this paper the authors argue that relevance may be lost at two levels. The first loss occurs when the practice of project management is transferred, through generalisation and standardisation, into what is generally known as “Best Practice”. The second occurs when “Best Practice” is transferred back to where it is applied (education, research, certification and practice).

    Research limitations/implications – The risk of losing relevance has consequences for what one bases one's assumptions of the nature of projects upon. If the assumptions are based on standardized knowledge, without critically assessing its correctness, the likelihood of producing less relevant research is higher.

    Practical implications – With the risk of losing relevance the authors argue that anyone involved in the areas of education, research, certification and practice needs to be cautious of how they perceive and work with the standards. There is a risk that the knowledge becomes even less relevant and students and practitioners are therefore less prepared for reality.

    Originality/value – This paper is part of the literature critiquing the standardization of project management knowledge but it is distinct in terms of how the diffusion processes are perceived and utilized in a project setting.

  • 16.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    2012 Awards for Excellence2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Burström, Thommie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The Role of Transition in Temporary Organizations: Linking Temporary to the Permanent2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 576-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This research note puts the role of transition back in the center of the temporary organization and lends to understanding the temporary organization as a transitory unit within the permanent organization. The purpose is to reactivate theory development within this field of research and promote a dialog that will point to a possible way forward.

    Design/methodology/approach – An intra-organizational perspective is taken. Backgrounds of the two theories are covered and then the temporary organization as a transitory unit, and the role of transition are addressed. One basic transformation is made in the theory of the temporary organization and then the model superposed on the behavioral theory of the firm.

    Findings – In total, four things were achieved. First, the conceptualization of temporary organization was simplified – five variables have been reduced to four in eliminating “action” as an element of description. Second, the conceptualization was extended to include constructs of the permanent organization. Third, the theory was strengthened by providing an extended framework that potentially could be examined to check observations against theory. Finally, some directions were suggested for future theory development to take.

    Research limitations/implications – The research note is conceptual, so applicability depends upon the nature of the particular organization to which it is applied.

    Originality/value – Although the paper is conceptual, the authors believe that the approach can be used to understand the interrelatedness of the temporary and permanent organization and to promote a dialog within this field of research – a dialog that hopefully will reactivate theory development.

  • 18.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The grabber: making a first impression the Wilsonian way2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 739-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of what a good grabber is and how to construct one. This is done by drawing on the insights provided by Professor Timothy L. Wilson, for whom this paper is written as an “honorary piece.”

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a small sample of papers from the 48 journals that have received contributions from Professor Wilson throughout the years. A total of 12 papers have been selected, using a mix of convenience and haphazard sampling. The grabber of each paper has then been analyzed based on its nature and style.

    Findings – Based on the review and analysis, five different types of grabbers were identified; the quote, the anecdote, the provocative question, the surprise, and the metaphor, each type representing a unique way (and strategy) of creating initial interest.

    Research limitations/implications – As this paper was intentionally based on a convenience sample, further investigation is needed to establish whether the presented categories have clear validity and/or whether there are additional categories/strategies for how to create good grabbers.

    Originality/value – Creation of interest is an increasingly important part of everyday academic practice. As the grabber is a rarely addressed phenomenon in academic literature, the presented categories should be of both interest and practical use to academics in most fields. 

  • 19.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Lundin, Rolf A.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort2016In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 752-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze important parts of the contemporary development of project research and to outline plausible and desirable directions for the future. Design/methodology/approach - This is accomplished through a review of the "Scandinavian School of Project Management" and "Rethinking Project Management," which is complemented with a set of questions distributed to 27 active researchers within the project research field from around the world. Findings - Through the analysis the authors show how the two streams have more similarities than differences, despite the fact that they have been initiated in very different contexty 8ts and ways. The authors could also conclude that the "Scandinavian School" appears stronger on the international scene than in the Nordic countries, and that general perception of what the "school" stands for has changed and been blurred with time. Based on the analysis the authors also proposed the need for a broad, more coherent research effort in terms of a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations. The essence of this would be: an action research profile to improve practice and foresee the future; a combined research focus on institutional change and project practice to ensure both theoretical and empirical progress; and a strong global perspective to further enrich both theory and practice. Research limitations/implications - This research has obvious limitations in terms of empirical scope and response selection. The questionnaire results should therefore be interpreted with care. Originality/value - The value of this research lies in its reflective nature and the proposed trajectory of the project research domain.

  • 20.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Breaking out of the straitjacket of project research: in search of contribution2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 378-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a different and partly new strategy is needed in order to make research on projects relevant and interesting to a wider scientific community, including organisation and management theory.

    Design/methodology/approach – The aim is accomplished through a mystery-focused process that identifies what is not explained and continuously confronts empirical data with theoretical explanations in an interactive manner.

    Findings – Based on a phenomenology-stimulated meta-analysis of the field of project research, the paper outlines an alternative view of the field of project research and four streams of research, each of which is represented by its own scope, focus, audience and “taken-for-granted” assumptions. The streams are: in search of best practice, in search of legitimacy, in search of inspiration and in search of contribution.

    Research limitations/implications – The paper suggests that, in order to make an true impact on management and social science theories in general, projects must be redefined as objects of study rather than the raison d'être. The inherent paradox, and the conclusion of the paper is that, in order to become more relevant for a broader research community, projects must be reduced to an empirical illustration, a case among others.

    Originality/value – The paper provides a meta-analysis of the project management research field and offers new insights into challenges that need to be addressed in order to make project management research relevant for a wider management research community.

  • 21. Lopez, Eduardo V.
    et al.
    Medina, Alicia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Influence of ethical behaviors in corporate governance2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 586-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of key aspects of a recently defended PhD thesis. It enables readers who may be interested in the thesis topic to gain an overview of that work and a link to the entire thesis through a URL link www.dropbox.com/s/1gikjlh6qw0v26u/Dissertation_Eduardo_Lopez_03122015.pdf?dl=0. The second purpose of this Thesis Research Note (TRN) is to explain the thesis author's doctoral journey. Design/methodology/approach - The methodology was rooted in critical realism using mixed research methods. The approach for the paper is to provide a reflective narrative to explain the lived experience of the authors throughout the candidate's doctoral journey. Findings - The theoretical implications of this study are the introduction of two new constructs (The Small Sins Allowed (SSA) and the Line of Impunity (LoI)) and the definition of these constructs as variables that affect corporate governance. Research limitations/implications - Although this study was intended to collect feedback regardless of geographical location, over 91 percent of responses came from the USA, Canada, and Latin America. For this reason, generalization beyond these boundaries requires further analysis. Practical implications - The practical implications are related to the application of the two constructs (SSA and the LoI) into the daily corporate governance activities. Social implications - SSA and LoI, can be the foundation for renewed and vigorous corporate governance. SSA helps to establish a level above which adherence to ethical standards is expected. LoI aids in identifying ethical fault lines. Together they help to keep unethical behaviors under control. Originality/value - The TRN provides a highly individualized account of a doctoral journey but it is intended to contribute to the growing body of TRNs published in this journal that in turn may inform decisions relating to candidates embarking on a doctoral journey.

  • 22. Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Current foci of Nordic approaches to project research2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Medina, Rolf
    et al.
    Medina, Alicia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Managing competence and learning in knowledge-intensive, project-intensive organizations A case study of a public organization2017In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 505-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Competence management should no longer be considered as disconnected activities with few relationships with the organizational goals. It is the viewpoint that competence management as a whole consists of different mechanisms and strategies that involve many functions in the organization and link strategy, product/service development, and innovation. The purpose of this paper is to explore how a public knowledge-intensive, project-intensive organization manages competence in relation to its organizational goals and to identify which mechanisms are involved in this process as well as the underlying factors of those mechanisms. Design/methodology/approach - The research was conducted following a single case study approach using several sources of evidence in a public organization responsible for public transport in the south of Sweden. Findings - A theoretical framework called the competence loop is used as a platform. The results expand the framework by identifying underlying factors constituting the mechanisms and categorizing those factors in organizational and social dimensions. Another contribution is the competence concept including the factors that generate new competence. Furthermore, the study highlights that organizational culture has an impact on efficient competence management. Research limitations/implications - This study was conducted in a public organization; similar studies should be conducted in other kinds of knowledge-intensive, project-intensive organizations. Originality/value - The results provide support to practitioners when trying to understand how competence evolves, how to facilitate learning in organizations that are reliant on human resources, how to manage competence to achieve organizational success, and show the role of the project as a competence arena.

  • 24.
    Medina, Rolf
    et al.
    SKEMA Business School.
    Medina, Alicia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The competence loop: Competence management in knowledge-intensive, projectintensive organizations2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 279-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Knowledge-intensive organizations tend to be project intensive having many projects of different size and importance. In this context, competence evolves through projects.

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the mechanisms that steers competence management in these kinds of organizations and also the factors that are involved in the human capital contribution to competitive advantage in relation to the interaction between parent organizations and projects.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study has a contingency theory perspective and consists of a literature search in the following domains: project-intensive organizations, knowledge-intensive organizations, competence management, human resource management and dynamic capabilities and learning.

    Findings – The main contribution of this study is the theoretical framework derived from different domains. The framework is called the competence loop and explains how projects generate competence that the parent organization can either exploit in further activities or use for strategy adjustment. It also explains how an organization can use learning strategies to support competenc exploration/exploitation. Another contribution is the description of the relationship between dynamic capabilities and organizational learning in project-intensive organizations.

    Research limitations/implications – This paper is a conceptual paper intended to create a base for further empirical studies.

    Originality/value – The paper combines different domains to define a framework that is a new approach to competencemanagement in a project-parent organizational context. The framework includes learning and competence management characteristics and has both theoretical and practical value.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Reflections on Barry W. Boehm's "A spiral model of software development and enhancement"2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 737-756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the content, contributions and subsequentdevelopments of the seminal paper by Barry Boehm, “A spiral model of software development andenhancement” written in 1988. The relationships of this paper to software development, agile projects,real options and present practice are put into perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach – Basically an essayist approach is taken. First, the contents ofBoehm’s paper are reviewed and then associated with subsequent developments.

    Findings – Review of the paper as published represents a documentation of cutting-edge softwaredevelopment as it existed at the time. Fundamentally it suggests the viability of a non-linear,customer-influenced, development approach.

    Practical implications – This basic approach illustrated in the spiral model of course has found itsway into complex project approaches and management.

    Originality/value – This paper follows the lines of increasing attention to classics, which is thepurpose of this special issue of the journal. In particular, attention is called to the transition ofthought on projects and project management from supplier-oriented, linear processes tocustomer/client-influenced, non-linear ones.

  • 26.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Global careerists’ identity construction: A narrative study of repeat expatriates and international itinerants2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 804-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a thesis on global careers; a topic relevant to many project managers working internationally. The main purpose of the thesis was to contribute to the understanding of global careers through applying an identity construction perspective on narratives of global careerists' working lives.

    Design/methodology/approach – Through a narrative approach, 20 interviews with Swedish global careerists were analyzed and comparison of two types of global careerists was made – repeat expatriates and international itinerants.

    Findings – The repeat expatriates and international itinerants are shown to have different patterns in their identity construction and there are differences in their career orientations, in their identifications with the organizations they work for, with their careers and with what they do. They also differ in how they identify with their home country and culture and the countries and cultures in which they live. Circumstances such as the type of location, the time abroad, and if the work abroad is perceived as temporary, are significant in their identity construction.

    Practical implications – Both organizations and individuals benefit from understanding the implications of such careers. The results of this study can lead to the development of HRM practices to attract and maintain the relationship with these individuals and draw on their skills.

    Originality/value – By considering individuals' subjective experiences of global careers through an identity construction perspective, new understanding can be reached on individuals undergoing multiple transitions over the course of their careers.

  • 27.
    Näsholm, Malin H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Co-creation as a strategy for program management2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 58-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Little attention has been paid to the initial development of programs. The purpose of this paper is to explore co-creation as an alternative strategic approach for program management. Co-creation of programs means that the projects within the program are created by the users and producers of the projects.

     

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of the co-creation approach of the Umeå 2014 European Capital of Culture program. The empirical material analyzed consists of qualitative interviews with members of the Umeå 2014 team and the politicians involved, as well as secondary data on the program.

     

    Findings – The Umeå 2014 Capital of Culture program takes the form of a platform that makes meetings and interactions possible. Co-creation allows for creative cultural projects to emerge, but the program becomes reliant on the different actors involved. Balancing dilemmas of multiple stakeholders and maintaining control while enabling the emergence of ideas is key.

     

    Practical implications – These findings have practical implications for the management of more emergent program structures. A flexible organization with guiding values and criteria to balance the different projects can be used to achieve program goals when multiple stakeholders have their own agendas.

     

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to research on program management by introducing the concept of co-creation as a strategic approach for program management. The creative and innovative benefits of co-creation can be reached in the development of programs but other challenges for their management are involved.

  • 28. Turner, J. Rodney
    et al.
    Müller, Ralf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Dulewicz, Vic
    Comparing the leadership styles of functional and project managers2009In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 198-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between leadership competences of project managers and those of functional managers.

    Design/methodology/approach – Leadership styles of 414 project managers were assessed using a validated research instrument, the leadership development questionnaire. The results were compared with the leadership profiles of over 1,000 functional managers, assessed with the same instrument. Quantitative analysis techniques were used to identify significant differences in the leadership styles of project managers when compared to functional managers. Correlations between leadership competences and leadership performance and follower commitment of project managers were compared with those of functional managers.

    Findings – The paper finds that project managers score higher than functional managers on conscientiousness, sensitivity, and critical analysis, but they score lower on communication and development competencies. The correlation between the fit of project managers to their organizational context and their leadership performance and follower commitment was calculated.

    Research limitations/implications – Comparisons show differences in leadership competences for functional and project managers. Managers in general management roles should be trained to a lesser extent in managerial and intellectual competences than those in project management roles. However, solid training in emotional competences is needed for success in both managerial roles.

    Originality/value – The differences in leadership competences of project managers and line managers from industry and government are identified.

  • 29.
    Wåhlin, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Guest editorial2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture is an important part of the society and economy. People tend to evaluate progress through the delivery and survival of cultural artifacts whether that is in tangible terms or through memory of spectacular events. In this way project management has much to offer society. Recent developments highlight how cultural issues in general become necessary for city and community development in order to maintain their attraction as livable places both for citizens and organizations. The variety of cultural activities range from performing and visual arts, music scenes and theaters, to concentrated efforts related to cultural festivals and large-scale Capital of Culture-years including multitudes of artistic expressions. Although it is widely acknowledged that culture matters to society, our understanding of how cultural projects are organized remain under-studied. This lack of knowledge is further emphasized when we consider how core cultural activities are related to creative industries and business development. A wide spectrum of artistic expressions is considered to stimulate co-creation and creativity between different spheres of activities, but the question is how. Despite the complexity of weaving together cultural activities of various types, projects stand out as a common denominator. Organizing by projects energize collaborative actions and provide arenas for creative exploration of the opportunities that lie ahead.

    The idea for a special issue on organizing cultural projects was triggered by a research project conducted at Umeå School of Business and Economics concerning the European Capital of Culture initiative in the City of Umeå, Sweden, which was implemented during 2014 (Wåhlin, 2012). We investigated how such a large-scale initiative was organized and planned before, during and after the event and how each phase of the implementation comprised challenges of various kinds. One prominent feature that stood out was the use of projects both when it came to assembling the program in its entirety as well as when it came to energizing small scale initiatives among cultural practitioners (Näsholm and Blomquist, 2015). The tendency of projectification really became obvious and made us aware of a more general trend of organizing cultural activities through projects all over Europe not least stimulated by the European Union (Lundinet al., 2015a). By stretching the boundaries of the normal routines every city seems to strive for turning the conditions of the creative city (Andersson, 2011) into action by empowering and stimulating citizens in co-creative projects. When considering such endeavors we mean that the notion of the projective city seems more appropriate and relevant (APROS/EGOS, 2015).

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf