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  • 1.
    Arbuthnott, Andrew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Regional cooperative and competitive forces driving industry cluster development and renewal2011In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 22-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research paper assembles regional industry clusters cooperative and competitive relations into a conceptual framework and reports upon an empirical case study that captured initial developments of a regional biorefinery industry cluster in a peripheral region of Sweden. Key findings from the research illustrate how forces of intra-regional cooperation and inter-regional competition drove the new biorefinery industry clusters development, which in turn aided the peripheral regions renewal efforts. For the development and renewal of regional industry, the role of not-for-profit collaborative organisations is evident. As a result, this single case-study provides new implications for research and practice in specific relation to regional renewal and industry cluster development within peripheral regions.

  • 2.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Flinders University School of Medicine & The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia.
    Koster, Rhonda
    Addressing the problem of Indigenous disadvantage in remote areas of developed nations: a plea for more comparative research2012In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 110-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been well documented that Indigenous populations in developed ‘postcolonial’ nations (such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States) experience disadvantage in a number of areas when compared with their non-Indigenous counterparts. Despite (or perhaps because of) a range of policy initiatives and political approaches to addressing disadvantage, there continues to be poor understandings of what 'works' and under what conditions. There is a body of literature which compares conditions, political ideas and policy initiatives across the jurisdictions, but the bases for comparison are poorly described; there is insufficient linking of research into ‘ideas’ with research into initiatives and their outcomes, and there is insufficient engagement of Indigenous people in the research. This paper proposes a more rigorous approach to comparative research that is based on principals of partnership with and participation of Indigenous people. We conclude that well designed participatory comparative research can not only provide new insights to old problems, but can improve Indigenous people's access to global knowledge systems.

  • 3.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. School of Tourism & Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    de la Barre, Suzanne
    Vancouver Island University.
    Editorial: Communities and New Development Paths in the Sparsely Populated North2017In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 12, no 2-3, p. i-xiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Agnidakis, Paul
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    Woube, Annie
    Rural place marketing and consumption-driven mobilities in Northern Sweden: challenges and opportunities for community sustainability2017In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 12, no 2-3, p. 114-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similar to other northern peripheries, remote, and sparsely populated areas (SPAs) in Sweden’s far north have been confronted with decreasing populations and economic stagnation, forcing local governments to more actively engage in strategies for attracting and retaining populations. This exploratory community case study considers rural place-marketing efforts in the municipalities of Åsele and Storuman, with a particular focus on understanding differing local strategies for attracting consumption-driven movers to "amenity-poor" and "amenity-rich" areas. The case study examines two research questions: what target groups do these municipalities envisage as desired new populations; and to what extent, and how, do they engage in rural place-marketing efforts? Our study reveals that the municipal officials’ views on rural place-marketing strategies differ considerably, as Åsele participates in Europe’s largest emigration expo while Storuman draws on its increasing tourism development to attract seasonal residents and returning young adults in the family-building stage of the life course. The findings further illustrate how production and performance aspects of mobility are essential when studying the socio-economic sustainability of everyday life in sparsely populated northern Swedish municipalities at different geographical places and levels.

  • 5.
    Kainz, Thekla
    et al.
    IMC Krems University, Austria.
    Carson, Doris A.
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Temporary Indigenous Mobility in Remote South Australia: Understanding the challenges for urban based health and social service delivery2012In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 16-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote dwelling Indigenous people in Australia frequently move between remote communities and urban centres for reasons such as access to health and social services, cultural and family obligations, or leisure and recreation. Short-term mobility challenges health and social service providers not only to deliver services to remote communities but to make sure that adequate services are available in places Indigenous people visit. This paper documents how service providers in two urban centres in remote South Australia respond to the challenges presented by temporary Indigenous visitors. The paper identifies a number of reasons why the existing health and social service sector is poorly set up to deal with the needs of temporary Indigenous visitors. Many service providers are aware that different groups of (temporary) Indigenous clients may require different services. However, they are limited in their capacity to change existing service strategies due to rigid funding structures and a lack of inter-agency collaboration and service coordination.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University. Centre for Regional Science, Umeå University.
    Fuller, Tony
    School of Environmental Design & Rural Development University of Guelph Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
    Pletsch, Carolyn
    Centre for Families,Work & Well Being University of Guelph Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
    Business and Community Approaches to Rural Development: Comparing Government-To-Local Approaches2012In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 152-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Canadian Community Futures Program and the European Union program for rural development, LEADER, are similar in their ambitions to boost rural development at community level through state intervention. Each program offers universal coverage, external funding and a set of regulations to be adjusted to local circumstances through local action. Economic development and an increased local capacity to act are important ambitions. When comparing the two programs differences become evident. The Community Futures focus on short term business development through revolving loans, counseling and community projects, whereas LEADER have a mid- to long term perspective in creating development oriented networks through project funding. In evaluating and learning from these programs, this paper argues that mainly core objectives (economic and employment outputs) are measured and accounted for whereas outcomes such as community performance, leadership development, community cohesion, confidence building and youth engagement often are neglected. The latter are of greater importance for the continued pursuit of establishing learning communities.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Meanings of ‘The Local’ in a Swedish Rural Development Organization: All Sweden Shall Live!2018In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 39-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organized rural development in Sweden can be described at two levels; a local level with a large number of local actors organized in a so-called village-action movement, and a national level where political parties and the government present different suggestions on how to develop rural areas. However, characteristic for Sweden is also a close relationship between these two levels and a bottom-up perspective encouraging local initiatives, which is exemplified by All Sweden Shall Live (ASSL); a general rural development organization characterized by both policy-making ambitions and support of local development projects. A central but also ambiguous concept in the organization ASSL’s campaigns and ideology is ‘the local,’ and with discourse theory, as a point of departure, this case-study examines how different meanings of ‘the local’ are used to advocate investments in local perspectives and local measures. Special attention is directed towards how meanings of ‘the local’ form a ‘fantasy,’ an emotional and ideological worldview, and how this worldview is of importance in the organization’s self-legitimization and for its potential as an agent of political mobilization. While ASSL is a Swedish organization, the subject is of general relevance because ideological investments in both ‘the local’ and ‘the regional’ are common, for example, in processes of relocalization—local responses to globalization—and in arguments about the importance of localities and regions in a global economy. Furthermore, the paper illustrates how such investments can have unexpected effects such as the transfer of responsibility for rural development from the government to local actors.

  • 8. Taylor, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Carson, Dean B.
    It’s Raining Men in Darwin: gendered Effects from the Construction of Major Oil and Gas Projects2014In: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction of large onshore oil and gas processing plants brings the promise of significant local economic attributions; however, the injection of a high churning male construction workforce can change and dominate the host community's demographics. This can generate a range of issues which are well documented in the literature on resource 'Boomtowns'. But because most studies are retrospective and focus on small towns, findings may hold limited transitivity to relatively large and economically diverse towns or cities. Consequently research based knowledge for the facilitation of dialogue between governments, the community and industry on the scale and timing of construction impacts is absent. Darwin, a city of around 130,000 residents in the north of Australia, has secured a large liquid natural gas processing plant which is currently under construction. The plant is touted to bring substantial economic benefits with a peak construction workforce of more than 3,500 anticipated. But little meaningful discussion on possible effects on population makeup and social fabric of the city has been forthcoming. This study profiles the INPEX plant construction workforce under several scenarios based on combinations of local worker engagement and total workforce size. Profiles are overlayed onto population projection data to appraise the scale of demographic and social impacts. Findings show that, despite Darwin's size and pre-existing population, labour force and family profiles, the project will contribute significant demographic and social upheaval during construction. Governments, the community and industry are advised to engage in an early and open dialogue focused on mitigating negative and garnering positive long-term outcomes with this research as the basis.

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