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  • 1. Datry, T.
    et al.
    Foulquier, A.
    Corti, R.
    von Schiller, D.
    Tockner, K.
    Mendoza-Lera, C.
    Clement, J. C.
    Gessner, M. O.
    Moleon, M.
    Stubbington, R.
    Gucker, B.
    Albarino, R.
    Allen, D. C.
    Altermatt, F.
    Arce, M. I.
    Arnon, S.
    Banas, D.
    Banegas-Medina, A.
    Beller, E.
    Blanchette, M. L.
    Blanco-Libreros, J. F.
    Blessing, J. J.
    Boechat, I. G.
    Boersma, K. S.
    Bogan, M. T.
    Bonada, N.
    Bond, N. R.
    Brintrup Barria, K. C.
    Bruder, A.
    Burrows, R. M.
    Cancellario, T.
    Canhoto, C.
    Carlson, S. M.
    Cauvy-Fraunie, S.
    Cid, N.
    Danger, M.
    Terra, Bianca de Freitas
    De Girolamo, A. M.
    de La Barra, Evans
    del Campo, R.
    Diaz-Villanueva, V. D.
    Dyer, F.
    Elosegi, A.
    Faye, E.
    Febria, C.
    Four, B.
    Gafny, S.
    Ghate, S. D.
    Gomez, R.
    Gómez-Gener, Lluís
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Graca, M. A. S.
    Guareschi, S.
    Hoppeler, F.
    Hwan, J. L.
    Jones, J. , I
    Kubheka, S.
    Laini, A.
    Langhans, S. D.
    Leigh, C.
    Little, C. J.
    Lorenz, S.
    Marshall, J. C.
    Martin, E.
    McIntosh, A. R.
    Meyer, E. , I
    Milisa, M.
    Mlambo, M. C.
    Morais, M.
    Moya, N.
    Negus, P. M.
    Niyogi, D. K.
    Papatheodoulou, A.
    Pardo, I
    Paril, P.
    Pauls, S. U.
    Pesic, V
    Polasek, M.
    Robinson, C. T.
    Rodriguez-Lozano, P.
    Rolls, R. J.
    Sanchez-Montoya, M. M.
    Savic, A.
    Shumilova, O.
    Sridhar, K. R.
    Steward, A. L.
    Storey, R.
    Taleb, A.
    Uzan, A.
    Vander Vorste, Ross
    Waltham, N. J.
    Woelfle-Erskine, C.
    Zak, D.
    Zarfl, C.
    Zoppini, A.
    A global analysis of terrestrial plant litter dynamics in non-perennial waterways2018In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perennial rivers and streams make a disproportionate contribution to global carbon (C) cycling. However, the contribution of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES), which sometimes cease to flow and can dry completely, is largely ignored although they represent over half the global river network. Substantial amounts of terrestrial plant litter (TPL) accumulate in dry riverbeds and, upon rewetting, this material can undergo rapid microbial processing. We present the results of a global research collaboration that collected and analysed TPL from 212 dry riverbeds across major environmental gradients and climate zones. We assessed litter decomposability by quantifying the litter carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and oxygen (O2) consumption in standardized assays and estimated the potential short-term CO2 emissions during rewetting events. Aridity, cover of riparian vegetation, channel width and dry-phase duration explained most variability in the quantity and decomposability of plant litter in IRES. Our estimates indicate that a single pulse of CO2 emission upon litter rewetting contributes up to 10% of the daily CO2 emission from perennial rivers and stream, particularly in temperate climates. This indicates that the contributions of IRES should be included in global C-cycling assessments.

  • 2.
    Hotchkiss, E. R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hall, R. O., Jr.
    Sponseller, R. A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Butman, D.
    Klaminder, J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Laudon, H.
    Rosvall, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Karlsson, J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sources of and processes controlling CO2 emissions change with the size of streams and rivers2015In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 696-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) evasion from streams and rivers to the atmosphere represents a substantial flux in the global carbon cycle(1-3). The proportions of CO2 emitted from streams and rivers that come from terrestrially derived CO2 or from CO2 produced within freshwater ecosystems through aquatic metabolism are not well quantified. Here we estimated CO2 emissions from running waters in the contiguous United States, based on freshwater chemical and physical characteristics and modelled gas transfer velocities at 1463 United States Geological Survey monitoring sites. We then assessed CO2 production from aquatic metabolism, compiled from previously published measurements of net ecosystem production from 187 streams and rivers across the contiguous United States. We find that CO2 produced by aquatic metabolism contributes about 28% of CO2 evasion from streams and rivers with flows between 0.0001 and 19,000 m(3) s(-1). We mathematically modelled CO2 flux from groundwater into running waters along a stream-river continuum to evaluate the relationship between stream size and CO2 source. Terrestrially derived CO2 dominates emissions from small streams, and the percentage of CO2 emissions from aquatic metabolism increases with stream size. We suggest that the relative role of rivers as conduits for terrestrial CO2 efflux and as reactors mineralizing terrestrial organic carbon is a function of their size and connectivity with landscapes.

  • 3.
    Serikova, Svetlana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pokrovsky, O. S.
    Ala-Aho, P.
    Kazantsev, V.
    Kirpotin, S. N.
    Kopysov, S. G.
    Krickov, I. V.
    Laudon, H.
    Manasypov, R. M.
    Shirokova, L. S.
    Soulsby, C.
    Tetzlaff, D.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    High riverine CO2 emissions at the permafrost boundary of Western Siberia2018In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 825-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fate of the vast stocks of organic carbon stored in permafrost of the Western Siberian Lowland, the world's largest peat-land, is uncertain. Specifically, the amount of greenhouse gas emissions from rivers in the region is unknown. Here we present estimates of annual CO2 emissions from 58 rivers across all permafrost zones of the Western Siberian Lowland, between 56 and 67 degrees N. We find that emissions peak at the permafrost boundary, and decrease where permafrost is more prevalent and in colder climatic conditions. River CO2 emissions were high, and on average two times greater than downstream carbon export. We suggest that high emissions and emission/export ratios are a result of warm temperatures and the long transit times of river water. We show that rivers in the Western Siberian Lowland play an important role in the carbon cycle by degassing terrestrial carbon before its transport to the Arctic Ocean, and suggest that changes in both temperature and precipitation are important for understanding and predicting high-latitude river CO2 emissions in a changing climate.

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