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  • 1.
    Abramsson, Linnea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Prevalence of drug-related problems using STOPP/START and medication reviews in elderly patients with dementia2019In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drug-related problems (DRPs) are common among elderly patients with dementia. STOPP/START is an explicit tool that has been used to detect DRPs among elderly patients.

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare prevalence and type of DRPs identified by STOPP/START with DRPs identified by clinical pharmacists among the same population. Secondary objectives were to investigate factors associated with the use of DRPs using the two methods.

    Method: Extracts from medical records were used to identify DRPs in 212 patients by using STOPP/START. The patients were ≥65 years of age with dementia or cognitive impairment. An earlier study was performed in the same study population in 2012–2014, where DRPs were identified by clinical pharmacists in order to decrease the number of rehospitalizations.

    Results: STOPP/START identified DRPs in 72.2% of the patients compared with 66.0% identified by the clinical pharmacists. The numbers of DRPs identified by the different methods were 326 and 310, respectively. Different types of DRPs were identified with the different tools. STOPP/START mainly identified DRPs in the categories “ineffective/inappropriate drug” and “needs additional drug therapy”, whereas the clinical pharmacists identified DRPs in several categories.

    Conclusion: Even though STOPP/START was able to identify a similar number of DRPs compared with DRPs identified by clinical pharmacists, STOPP/START failed to identify DRPs in several important categories. To cover all DRPs, STOPP/START might be used as a complement to implicit criteria.

  • 2.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Mattsson, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Wallman, Andy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame Australia, NSW, Australia.
    Pharmacists' satisfaction with their work: Analysis of an alumni survey2018In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 700-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The level of job satisfaction among practicing pharmacists is important because it has been found to affect job performance and employee turnover. The Swedish pharmacy market has undergone major changes in recent years, and little is known about pharmacists' job satisfaction.

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the level of job satisfaction and associated factors among graduates from the web-based pharmacy programs at Umea University.

    Methods: Job satisfaction of pharmacists was measured as part of an alumni survey conducted with those who graduated from the pharmacy programmes between 2006 and 2014. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, and logistic regression was used to explore factors affecting job satisfaction.

    Results: The total number of graduates who completed the survey was 222 (response rate 43%.) The majority of respondents were female (95%), and most were employed at a community pharmacy (85%). The mean age was 39.7 years. The majority of graduates (91%) were satisfied with their job "most of the time" or "all of the time", and 87% of the respondents would "definitely" or "maybe" choose the same career again. The multivariate analysis showed that increasing years in the current position (OR: 0.672 (0.519-0.871)) was associated with lower job satisfaction. Older age (OR: 1.123 (1.022-1.234)), the perception that the knowledge and skills acquired during university education is useful in the current job (OR: 4.643 (1.255-17.182)) and access to continuing professional development (OR: 9.472 (1.965 -45.662)) were associated with higher job satisfaction.

    Conclusion: Most graduates from the web-based pharmacy programmes were satisfied with their current job. Access to continuing professional development seems to be important for the level of job satisfaction among pharmacists.

  • 3.
    Sjölander, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pfister, Bettina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Jonsson, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Impact of clinical pharmacist engagement in ward teams on the number of drug-related readmissions among Swedish older patients with dementia or cognitive impairment: an economic evaluation2019In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 287-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical pharmacists play an increasing role in the pharmacological treatment of hospital-admitted older patients with dementia or cognitive impairment. In an earlier randomised controlled trial, clinical pharmacist involvement in the ward team could significantly reduce drug-related readmissions in patient subgroups. However, the economic impact of the intervention has not been addressed so far.

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the economic impact of clinical pharmacist engagement in hospital ward teams for medication therapy management in older patients with dementia or cognitive impairments.

    METHODS: Economic evaluation of a randomised controlled trial conducted in two hospitals in Northern Sweden between January 2012 and December 2014. Participants included 460 hospital-admitted older patients with dementia or cognitive impairments. Patients were randomly assigned to usual care, or usual care with pharmacist intervention; the intervention consisted of medication reconciliation, medication review, and participation in ward rounds. The outcomes were measured as drug-related readmissions to hospital as assessed by a group of external experts, 180 and 30 days after discharge. Costs included pharmacists' direct labour costs for the interventions, average costs for drug-related readmissions, and from this the total cost per person was calculated.

    RESULTS: The effect of the intervention on drug-related readmissions within 180 days was significant in patients without heart failure (subgroup analysis), and the intervention resulted in cost savings of €950 per person in this subgroup. Drug-related readmissions within 30 days were reduced in the total sample (post-hoc analysis), and the cost-savings in this intervention group were €460 per person.

    CONCLUSIONS: Post-hoc and subgroup analyses indicate that engagement of pharmacists in hospital ward teams reduced the number of drug-related readmissions, and that the cost per person was lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. Including clinical pharmacists created savings in the subgroups of older patients with dementia or cognitive impairments.

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