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  • 1.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ideellt arbete och föreningsdemokrati: Det demokratiska ledarskapets krav och utmaningar i IF Stoor – en fallstudie2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 9, p. 45-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, decision-making processes in the sport club ‘IF Stoor’ are analysed with a focus on so called voluntary “key actors” and their involvement in formal and informal decision-making processes. The aim of the study is to provide knowledge about how eleven key actors in a large sport club like IF Stoor – with approximately 3,000 members, many organisational levels but relatively few members involved in the formal decision-making bodies – acted and handled democratic claims and at the same time tried to secure the voluntary based sport production. The analysis shows that the key actors were involved continually in the club’s two parallel decision-making processes. There were formal decision-making bodies with statutes-directed processes which strengthened the club’s organization and economy. There were also informal, spatially indefinite and practice-driven decision-making processes that existed parallel with the formal ones. The informal decision-making processes, which had participatory qualities, involved a large part of the club’s about 150 leaders. This applied in particular to the coordinators of the club’s 10 sport sections – here labelled as key actors – who acted and functioned as organisational “nodes” in the decision-making processes. These coordinators, but also many other categories of members – especially leaders and athletes (and supportive relatives) – represented, in accordance with Ahrne & Papakosta’s organisational theory, ‘resources’, who occasionally engaged in participatory democratic discussions, negotiations and decisions. A conclusion drawn from this case study is that when informal decision-making processes are included in the analyses, a relatively large number of the club 150 leaders were involved in collective decision-making

  • 2.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Sport Sciences Center.
    The Artistocratic Taste for Sport among Swedish Sport Researchers2017In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cultural-scientific capital of sports researchers turns them into important arbiters of what is to count as a legitimate understanding of modern sport, and what is to be considered good and bad in sport. Drawing on the extensive work of Swedish sports researchers in social sciences and humanities between 1970 and 2010, the aim of this paper is to present a succinct view of how modern sport is portrayed in this intellectual milieu. The aim is to find out what its ascribed characteristics and essential values are, and then to contextualize this understanding socially and historically. The theoretical point of departure is the French cultural sociologist Pierre Bourdieu's writings on social classes and their different tastes for sport. Bourdieu's views on upper-class cultural fractions, which in his view includes university teachers and researchers, and their aristocratic attitude towards physical activity is of particular interest. This attitude includes a general distaste for win-at-all-cost – 'serious' – competitions, and a specific distaste for sports with a pronounced element of bodily contact such as boxing and football (soccer). According to the analysis presented here, this has also become the mainstream attitude among contemporary sport researchers in Sweden. The competition-critical discourse that is pronounced among Swedish researchers has one root in the general left-wing critique of the competitive market society prevalent in the 1970s, and another in specifically pedagogical ideas which claim that playful learning processes are always the most efficacious.

  • 3.
    Renström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Karp, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Sport for adults: Using frame factor theory to investigate the significance of local sports instructors for a new Sport for All programme in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 9, p. 87-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, Sport for All includes increasing adults’ physical activity levels. Drawing on frame factor theory, this article examined the establishment of a sports programme offering recreational and fitness activities for adults within the Swedish Sports Confederation. Data from eight interviews with local sports instructors were analysed to investigate the content of activities for adults and how and why the instructors carried out these activities. The main finding is that sports as fitness and recreation activities for adults are carried out by the instructors within three patterns: participatory, mediation, and continuous. There is a ‘logic of enabling’ that emerges from these patterns: the instructors strive to make it possible for adults to practise sport for fitness and recreational purposes through a range of adjustments. However, the cues for the instructors regarding how to carry out a practice for adults are vague. The results also show that these groups for adults will only be offered as long as the resources for the traditional elite groups and groups for children and youth are not at risk.

  • 4.
    Romar, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Henriksson, John
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Ketomäki, Kent
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Hastie, Peter
    Auburn University, USA.
    Teachers’ Learning Experiences with the Sport Education Model in Physical Education2016In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 7, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport Education is proposed as an instructional model addressing concerns regarding traditional approaches to teaching physical education. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the reflective accounts of cohort of in-service physical education teachers after learning about, and teaching, a season of Sport Education. Four female elementary and middle school physical education teachers participated in a professional development course organized by the university and the course focused on implementing instructional models. Data were gathered from interviews with the teachers and analyzed using inductive constant comparison. The teachers reported that the Sport Education model required more planning and preparation than traditional teaching and that they were more supervising and helping than teaching. All teachers adjusted the Sport Education model according to their own understanding, the context and the group. All teachers perceived that the students were actively engaged, cooperated and learned new skills. The study showed that regular physical education teachers can through professional development effectively implement a novel curriculum model.

  • 5.
    Söderström, Tor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brusvik, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lund, Stefan
    Department of Education and Teachers’ Practice, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Factors underlying competitive successin youth football: A study of the Swedish national U15 football talent system2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 139-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of Sweden’s 24 football districts analyses whether contextual factors (number of players, number of elite teams, and number of elite players on each district team) influence the district teams’ relative age effect (RAE) and the way in which contextual factors and RAE correlate with the U15 teams’ competitive success. The analysis is based on register data on district players (4,516 girls and 4,501 boys, all 15 years old) who attended an annual elite football camp: birthdate, the total number of players aged 15, club membership, senior elite clubs, proportion of elite players on the district teams, and match outcomes. Based on the birthdates of the players born between 2001 and 2012, a relative age index was constructed for each district. The results showed a relative age effect (RAE) for the selected district players (boys and girls) compared to the general 15-year-old football population; however, birthdate only affected the competitive success of the boys’ district teams. The analysis points out that contextual factors such as the number of football players and the presence of elite clubs are important to consider in order to understand how RAE is produced and its relationship to the success of winning matches for boys’ district teams.

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