umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bäck, Lena
    et al.
    Sharma, Bharati
    Karlström, Annika
    Tunón, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology. Östersunds sjukhus, kvinnosjukvården, Östersund, Sweden.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Professional confidence among Swedish final year midwifery students: a cross-sectional study2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 14, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous international studies have shown that midwifery students do not feel confident in many areas where they are supposed to practice independently. Objective: The knowledge about Swedish midwifery students' confidence is fairly under investigated. The purpose of the present study was to explore final years' midwifery students' professional confidence in basic midwifery skills according to ICM competencies and associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional survey where all midwifery programs in Sweden were invited to participate. Data was collected by a questionnaire that measured midwifery students self-reported assessment of confidence against four selected domains of ICM competencies; antenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and new-born care. Result: The main findings of this study showed that Swedish midwifery students were confident in managing normal pregnancy, labour and birth. Midwifery students at a school with a medical faculty were more confident in handling obstetric emergency situations. Some background variables were also associated with confidence. Conclusion: This study highlighted some midwifery skills that needs further training and reflection. More training and developing confidence in complicated and emergency situations are needed. There seem to be a need of midwifery education reforms if we believe that high levels of confidence at the time of graduation is equal to competent and skilled midwives in the future.

  • 2.
    Edvardsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology. Judith Lumley Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Åhman, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Fagerli, Tove Anita
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Holmlund, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Small, Rhonda
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology. Judith Lumley Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Norwegian obstetricians' experiences of the use of ultrasound in pregnancy management: a qualitative study2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 15, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore obstetricians' experiences and views of the use of obstetric ultrasound in clinical management of pregnancy. Methods: A qualitative interview study was undertaken in 2015 with obstetricians (N = 20) in Norway as part of the CROss Country Ultrasound Study (CROCUS). Results: Three categories developed during analyses. 'Differing opinions about ultrasound and prenatal diagnosis policies' revealed divergent views in relation to Norwegian policies for ultrasound screening and prenatal diagnosis. Down syndrome screening was portrayed as a delicate and frequently debated issue, with increasing ethical challenges due to developments in prenatal diagnosis. 'Ultrasound's influence on the view of the fetus' illuminated how ultrasound influenced obstetricians' views of the fetus as a 'patient' and a 'person'. They also saw ultrasound as strongly influencing expectant parents' views of the fetus, and described how ultrasound was sometimes used as a means of comforting women when complications occurred. The complexity of information and counselling' revealed how obstetricians balanced the medical and social aspects of the ultrasound examination, and the difficulties of 'delivering bad news' and counselling in situations of uncertain findings. Conclusion: This study highlights obstetricians' experiences and views of ultrasound and prenatal diagnosis in Norwegian maternity care and the challenges associated with the provision of these services, including counselling dilemmas and perceived differences in expectations between caregivers and expectant parents. There was notable diversity among these obstetricians in relation to their support of, and adherence to Norwegian regulations about the use of ultrasound, which indicates that the care pregnant women receive may vary accordingly.

  • 3. Fagerli, Tove A.
    et al.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Edvardsson, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Åhman, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Holmlund, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Eggebo, Torbjorn M.
    Midwives' and obstetricians' views on appropriate obstetric sonography in Norway2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The primary aim of this study was to investigate midwives' and obstetricians' views on how many ultrasound examinations should be part of standard care during pregnancy in Norway. Material and methods: This study is a part of a larger study, the CROss-Country Ultrasound Study (CROCUS), an international investigation of midwives' and obstetricians' experiences of and views on the use of ultrasound. We distributed 400 questionnaires to respondents in all five health regions in Norway: 40 to municipal midwives, 180 to midwives working in hospitals and 180 to obstetricians. The questionnaire included specific questions about the appropriate number of examinations during pregnancy, examinations without medical indication, non-medical ultrasound, commercialisation and safety. Results: The response rate was 45%. Of the respondents, 58% reported satisfaction with the offer of one scheduled ultrasound examination during pregnancy, as recommended in the Norwegian guidelines. Health care professionals who used ultrasound themselves were significantly more likely to want to offer more ultrasound examinations: 52% of the ultrasound users wanted to offer two or more ultrasound examinations vs. 16% of the non-users (p < .01). The majority of obstetricians (80%) reported that pregnant women expect to undergo ultrasound examination, even in the absence of medical indication. Conclusion: The majority of Norwegian health care professionals participating in this study supported the national recommendation on ultrasound in pregnancy. Ultrasound users wanted to offer more ultrasound examinations during pregnancy, whereas non-users were generally content with the recommendation. The majority of respondents thought that commercialisation was not a problem at their institution, and reported that ultrasound is often performed without a medical indication. The ultrasound users thought that ultrasound is safe.

  • 4. Hållstam, A.
    et al.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensen, C.
    Lofgren, M.
    Living with painful endometriosis - a struggle for coherence: a qualitative study2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 17, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The study sought to examine women's experience of painful endometriosis including long-term aspects, social consequences, impact of treatment and development of own coping strategies.

    Study design: This qualitative study was based on 16 individual interviews analyzed according to grounded theory. The thirteen women (age 24-48) were recruited at a pain clinic in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Results: A theory illustrating women's experience of living with painful endometriosis was developed with three categories and one core category. Bidirectional interactions between the categories and with the core category were found. Endometriosis influenced the women's sensations, feelings and reactions, creating a sense of difference from other women (category: Woman with painful endometriosis). The condition led to either helpful or harmful encounters with health care and significant others (category: Dependence). It also had overall physical, social and existential consequences (category: A ruined life). To cope, the women had to struggle for coherence by searching for understanding, coping and meaning (core category: Living with painful endometriosis).

    Conclusions: Living with severe painful endometriosis signified a struggle for coherence. The women needed to deal with feelings of difference, dependence and a ruined life and thus struggled for understanding, coping and meaning. Health-care providers should promote the struggle for coherence by explaining the feeling of difference, minimizing dependence and supporting the process of disease-related grief.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gendered discourses of youth sexualities - an exploration of PubMed articles on prevention of sexually transmissible infections2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how gender is addressed in medical articles on the prevention of sexually transmissible infections (STI) among adolescents.

    METHODS: Sixtyone articles were retrieved from a PubMed search and scrutinized by qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Most articles were affiliated with North American research institutions, but there were also reports from Europe, Africa, South America, and Asia. Gender turned up in the following four recurrent discourses: Gendered Receptiveness for Information, Stereotyped Heterosexual Expectations, Power Imbalance in Sexual Relations, and Gendered Prevention Approaches. Young women were described as knowledgeable, communicative, and responsible, but at risk because of feminine ideals and a lack of negotiating power. Men were described as less informed, more reluctant to discuss, and more risk taking due to masculine ideals and power dominance. Prevention approaches concerned how to postpone sex and/or tailor gender-sensitive programs for specific groups of young women and men.

    CONCLUSION: Researchers' own gender expectations might have a substantial impact on how sex and sexual health is considered in prevention research. To avoid reconstruction of current inequalities and stereotypes regarding sexual practices of young women and men, the impact of gender, the power structures in intimate relations, and the cultural context should be considered. Medical research on STI prevention could benefit from including a wider array of gender perspectives.

  • 6. Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    et al.
    Graner, Sophie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Phuc, Ho Dang
    Höjer, Bengt
    Johansson, Annika
    Pregnancies and births among adolescents: a population-based prospective study in rural Vietnam2010In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe birth rates and pregnancy outcomes, specifically stillbirth, preterm delivery and low birth weight (LBW) in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, among adolescent women in a rural district in northern Vietnam.

    Material and method: Within an epidemiological field laboratory, quarterly surveillance of 7767 adolescent women in the ages 15-19 during the period January 1999 to December 2005 was conducted. Birth rates were calculated and pregnancy outcomes were described in relation to background factors.

    Result: A total of 1021 pregnancies were reported by 926 adolescent women during the period of whom 17% were below 18 years. The estimated adolescent birth rate during 1999-2005 was 27/1000 women-years. The incidence of stillbirth among all births was 19/1000 births. These were more likely to be delivered preterm. The incidence of preterm deliveries and LBW infants was 193 and 75 per 1000 live births, respectively. There were no differences in socio-demographic background for stillbirth, preterm delivery or LBW.

    Conclusion: Adolescent birth rates were similar to those found in the recent Vietnamese DHS and considerably lower than the average for South-East Asia. Higher rates of stillbirth and preterm delivery were found than those previously reported for Vietnam, indicating the need for careful monitoring of adolescent pregnancies and their infants. Further research is needed to explore if and how much socio-demographic variables influence pregnancy outcome, comparing more differentiated groups, as a basis for interventions to assure access to adequate reproductive health care services for all women.

  • 7.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Lindberg, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nilsson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Uustal, Eva
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    “Struggling to settle with a damaged body”: a Swedish qualitative study of women’s experiences one year after obstetric anal sphincter muscle injury (OASIS) at childbirth2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 19, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to explore women’s experiences related to recovery from obstetric anal sphincter muscle injuries (OASIS) one year after childbirth.

    Method: This is a qualitative study based on written responses from 625 women approximately one year after childbirth in which OASIS occurred. Data was obtained from a questionnaire distributed by the national Perineal LacerationRegister (PLR) in Sweden. Inductive qualitative content analysis was applied for analysis.

    Results: The theme “Struggling to settle with a damaged body” indicated that the first year after OASIS involved a struggle to settle to and accept living with a changed and sometimes still-wounded body. Many participants described problems related to a non-functional sexual life, physical and psychological problems that left them feeling used and broken, and increased worries for their future health and pregnancies. However, some women had adjusted to their situation, had moved on with their lives, and felt recovered and strong. Encountering a supportive and helpful health care professional was emphasized as vital for recovery after OASIS.

    Conclusion: This study provides important insights on how women experience their recovery approximately one year after having had OASIS at childbirth, wherein many women still struggled to settle into their damaged bodies. Clear pathways are needed within health care organizations to appropriate health care services that address both physical and psychological health problems of women with prolonged recovery after OASIS.

  • 8.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Eurenius, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Leisure time physical activity among pregnant women and its associations with maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 9, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Physical activity during pregnancy is generally considered safe and beneficial for both the pregnant woman and her fetus. The overall aim was to investigate pregnant women's pre-pregnancy and early pregnancy physical activity and its associations with maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes.

    Methods

    This cross-sectional study combined data from the Maternal Health Care Register in Västerbotten (MHCR-VB) and the Salut Programme Register (Salut-R). Data were collected from 3,868 pregnant women living in northern Sweden between 2011 and 2012.

    Results

    Almost half of the participants (47.1%) achieved the recommended level of physical activity. Compared to the women who did not achieve the recommended level of exercise, these women had lower BMI, very good or good self-rated health, and a higher educational level. No significant associations could be established between physical activity levels and GDM, birth weight, or mode of delivery.

    Conclusions

    Positively, a considerably high proportion of Swedish pregnant women achieved the recommended level of physical activity. Factors associated with recommended physical activity level were BMI ≤30 kg/m2, very good or good self-rated health, and higher educational level. Our findings emphasize the need for health care professionals to early detect and promote fertile and pregnant women towards health-enhancing physical activity, especially those with low levels of physical activity and overweight/obesity, to improve overall health in this population.

  • 9.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Eurenius, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Change of lifestyle habits: motivation and ability reported by pregnant women in northern Sweden2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 13, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women are generally more motivated to change their lifestyle habits compared with non-pregnant women. However, the ability to change these habits depends on the motivation to change. This study describes pregnant women's self-reported motivation and ability to change lifestyle habits and their relation to body mass index (BMI), self-rated health, educational level and country of origin.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study combined data from the Maternal Health Care Register in Västerbotten (MHCR-VB) and the Salut Programme Register (Salut-R). Data were collected from 3,868 pregnant residents in Västerbotten County (northern Sweden) between 2011 and 2012. Chi-square test, two independent samples t-test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed.

    RESULTS: Most of the pregnant women (61.3%) were satisfied with their self-reported lifestyle habits irrespective of BMI, self-rated health, educational level, and country of origin. Many reported that they wanted to increase their physical activity, improve their dietary habits, and reduce their weight. In general, they estimated their ability to change their lifestyle habits as equal to their motivation of change. Women who reported a large or very large motivation to change their lifestyle habits were characterized by higher BMI and higher educational level.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most of the participating pregnant women were satisfied with their lifestyle habits, although they reported being further motivated to change some of them. Health care professionals encountering fertile and pregnant women may have a unique opportunity to support and promote lifestyle changes, taking into account women's motivation for change. Future research should focus on factors that motivate pregnant women to change their lifestyle, explore barriers for change of lifestyle and how support best may be provided to pregnant women. In addition, studies on lifestyle and motivation for lifestyle change from non-Nordic countries are called for.

  • 10.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    "Longing for individual recognition": pregnant women's experiences of midwives' counselling on physical activity during pregnancy2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 15, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims to explore among pregnant women were their experiences of lifestyle counselling provided by a midwife in antenatal care, addressing health promotion with special focus on physical activity during pregnancy, and factors influencing the trustworthiness of counselling conducted by a midwife. Methods: This qualitative study collected data from 14 pregnant, primiparous or multiparous women in gestational week 35–36 using in-depth interviews. The data were collected in Sweden in 2015. Qualitative content analysis was applied. Results: The theme "Longing for fulfilment of individual needs and expectations" emerged during analysis, including four categories; "Being exposed to unsatisfying counselling"; "Appreciating supportive and trustworthy counselling"; "Wrestling with cultures", and "Dealing with physical activity in daily life". The results indicated that some participants experienced limited counselling that was characterized by lack of knowledge, support, and trustworthiness in the midwife. Other participants reported valuable encouragement and support by the midwife. Participants were longing for individual recognition instead of receiving general advice on physical activity that was designed for all pregnant women. Conclusions: Individual counselling on physical activity during pregnancy based on the participant's individual needs was desired. On the contrary, the participants could experience the midwife as having her own agenda, insufficient knowledge and primarily focusing on medical surveillance. There is a need of increased level of knowledge among midwives in antenatal care, regarding lifestyle and lifestyle change during pregnancy. This may enhance promotion of a healthy lifestyle for the pregnant woman during counselling.

  • 11. Millde-Luthander, C
    et al.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Monica E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pettersson, H
    Wiklund, I
    Grunewald, C
    The impact of a computer assisted learning programme on the ability to interpret cardiotochography. A before and after study2012In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 37-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate if a computer assisted learning programme could bring about a higher degree of individuals who correctly classified cardiotochography (CTG) recordings in a non-selected population of midwives and physicians.

    Study design: A before and after study. Setting: Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

    Subjects: One hundred and thirty midwives and 49 physicians at the maternity unit, September 2009-April 2010. A computer assisted learning programme for interpreting CTG patterns has been created. All 179 individuals included made the first interpretation and the 135 individuals also completing the education made the second interpretation. A third randomly selected interpretation was performed immediately following the second: permitting two participants to classify a CTG together. Comparison between the before and after-test was based on the Fisher exact test.

    Main Outcome measure: The proportion of individuals who correctly classified CTGs before and after the training.

    Results: Sixty four percentage of the individuals classified the CTGs correctly before and 66% after the training (P = 0.76). There was no difference between the two professional groups. Normal CTGs were correctly identified by 36% of the individuals before and in 80% after the training (P = 0.065). Corresponding figures for pathological CTGs were 83% and 85% (P = 1.00), respectively.

    Conclusion: We found no improvement in the proportion of individuals who classified CTGs correctly after the completion of a computer assisted learning programme in fetal monitoring. The baseline level of competence was higher than expected. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Monica, Christianson
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Boman, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Men don’t think that far” – Interviewing men in Sweden aboutchlamydia and HIV testing during pregnancy from a discursivemasculinities construction perspective.2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We used qualitative research design to discursively explore expectant fathers’ perceptions of chlamydia and HIV, and their masculinity constructions about testing, and explored how they talked about their potential resistance towards testing and their pre-test emotions.

    Study design: Twenty men were offered chlamydia and HIV testing at the beginning of their partner’s pregnancy. Those who agreed to be tested were interviewed in-depth; those who declined testing were also interviewed. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis was inspired by discourse analysis on masculinity.

    Main outcome: Three discursive themes: Men prefer to suppress their vulnerability to STIs, Body and biology differ between men and women and Men have mixed emotions around STI testing underscore the informants’ conversations and sometimes conflicting thoughts about STI testing.

    Conclusion: The majority of men talked about pregnancy as a feminine territory, raised uncertainties about men’s roles in the transmission of STIs, and talked about women’s and men’s essentially different bodies and biology, where few men realised that they could infect both their partner and the unborn child. This knowledge gap that men have must become apparent to healthcare providers, and policy makers must give men equal access to the reproductive arena.

  • 13. Nilses, Carin
    et al.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    High weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk for emergency caesarean section - Population-based data from the Swedish Maternal Health Care Register 2011-20122017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 11, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to investigate maternal background factors' significance in relation to risk of elective and emergency caesarean sections (CS) in Sweden.

    Study design: Population-based, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Swedish Maternal Health Care Register (MHCR) is a national quality register that collects data on pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period. All women registered in MHCR 2011 to 2012 were included in the study sample (N = 178,716).

    Main outcomes: The risk of elective and emergency caesarean section in relation to age, parity, education, country of origin, weight in early pregnancy and weight gain during pregnancy was calculated in logistic regression models.

    Results: Multiparous women demonstrated a doubled risk of elective CS compared to primiparous women, but their risk for emergency CS was halved. Overweight and obesity at enrolment in antenatal care increased the risk for emergency CS, irrespective of parity. Weight gain above recommended international levels (Institute of Medicine, IOM) during pregnancy increased the risk for emergency CS for women with normal weight, overweight or obesity.

    Conclusion: There is a need of national guidelines on recommended weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden. We suggest that the usefulness of the IOM guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy should be evaluated in the Swedish context.

  • 14. Palm, Anna
    et al.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Hogberg, Ulf
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustav
    How do youth with experience of violence victimization and/or risk drinking perceive routine inquiry about violence and alcohol consumption in Swedish youth clinics?: A qualitative study2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 13, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore perceptions and experiences among youth who underwent structured questions about violence victimization and alcohol consumption when visiting Swedish youth clinics.

    Methods: This study is part of a larger research project examining the effect of including routine inquiry about violence victimization and alcohol consumption for youth visiting youth clinics. Fifteen youth with experiences of victimization and/or risk drinking (AUDIT-C >= 5) were interviewed. Content analysis was used.

    Results: The findings were grouped into three main categories: The first; "Disclosure talking about violence" reflected the participants' experiences of being asked about victimization. Participants were in favor of routine inquiry about violence victimization, even when questions caused distress. The questions helped participants reflect on prior victimization and process what had happened to them. The second; "Influence on the life situation" demonstrated that many of the participants still were effected by prior victimization, but also how talking about violence sometimes led to the possibility of initiating change such as leaving a destructive relationship or starting therapy. In the third; "One's own alcohol consumption in black and white" participants considered it natural to be asked about alcohol consumption. However, most participants did not consider their drinking problematic, even when told they exceeded guidelines. They viewed risk drinking in terms of immediate consequences rather than in quantity or frequency of alcohol intake.

    Conclusion: Routine inquiry about violence victimization and risk drinking at youth clinics was well received. Questions about violence helped participants to interpret and process prior victimization and sometimes initiated change.

  • 15.
    Wennberg, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Midwives' strategies in challenging dietary and weight counselling situations2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: By enhancing maternal nutritional status, midwives can help women lower the risks of pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes as well as improve maternal health during pregnancy and in the long run. Dietary counselling is, on the other hand, not reported to be effective. Poor communication and conflicting messages are identified as possible barriers to adherence with recommendations. Midwives' experiences of providing dietary advice and counselling during pregnancy are sparsely reported. The aim of this study was therefore to explore midwives' strategies when faced with challenging dietary counselling situations. Methods: Seventeen midwives from different parts of Sweden and working within antenatal health care were interviewed by telephone. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Challenges were commonly experienced when counselling women who were overweight, obese, had eating disorders or were from different cultures. The midwives talked in terms of "the problematic women" when addressing counselling problems. Strategies used in challenging counselling situations were Getting acquainted; Trying to support and motivate; Pressure to choose "correttly"; Controlling and mastering; and Resigning responsibility. Conclusions: The results indicate that Swedish midwives' counselling strategies are quite ambiguous and need to be questioned and that counselling of vulnerable groups of women should be highlighted. We could identify a need for education of practicing midwives to develop person-centred counselling skills.

  • 16.
    Wennberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandström, Herbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lundqvist, Anette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Swedish women’s food habits during pregnancy up to six months post-partum:: A longitudinal study2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 8, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diet influences the health of the foetus and the woman during pregnancy and later in life. Itis therefore important to investigate pregnant women’s food habits. The aim of this study was to describewomen’s food habits during pregnancy and up to six months post-partum.Study design: A Food Frequency Questionnaire (VIP-FFQ) was distributed to 163 pregnant women on fiveoccasions during and after pregnancy. Data were analysed using Friedman’s ANOVA and a Bonferronipost-hoc test.Main outcome measures: Food habits in relation to the National Food Agency’s (NFA) food index.Results: The pregnant women’s diets were inadequate according to the NFA food index. A tendency towardsan even poorer diet after delivery was identified, something which was related to an increased intakeof discretionary food, e.g. sweets, cakes, cookies, crisps, ice cream, and decreased intake of fruit and vegetable.The alcohol consumption was low throughout.Conclusions: The food habits during pregnancy were inadequate compared to recommendations and thesehabits became unhealthier after delivery. These suggest that dietary counselling needs to be more effectiveand continued into the lactating period. An increased focus should be given to healthy eating fromthe life course perspective, not just focus on effects on the foetus and pregnancy outcomes.

  • 17.
    Åhman, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Edvardsson, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology. Judith Lumley Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Kidanto, Hussein Lesio
    Ngarina, Matilda
    Small, Rhonda
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    'Without ultrasound you can't reach the best decision': midwives' experiences and views of the role of ultrasound in maternity care in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 15, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore Tanzanian midwives' experiences and views of the role of obstetric ultrasound in relation to clinical management of pregnancy, and in situations where maternal and fetal health interests conflict. Method: In 2015, five focus group discussions were conducted with midwives (N = 31) at three public referral hospitals in the Dar es Salaam region as part of the CROss Country Ultrasound Study (CROCUS). Results: Ultrasound was described as decisive for proper management of pregnancy complications. Midwives noted an increasing interest in ultrasound among pregnant women. However, concerns were expressed about the lack of ultrasound equipment and staff capable of skilful operation. Further, counselling regarding medical management was perceived as difficult due to low levels of education among pregnant women. Conclusion: Ultrasound has an important role in management of pregnancy complications. However, lack of equipment and shortage of skilled healthcare professionals seem to hamper use of obstetric ultrasound in this particular low-resource setting. Increased availability of obstetric ultrasound seems warranted, but further investments need to be balanced with advanced clinical skills' training as barriers, including power outages and lack of functioning equipment, are likely to continue to limit the provision of pregnancy ultrasound in this setting.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf