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  • 1. Bozorgmanesh, Mohammad Reza
    et al.
    Hadaegh, Farzad
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Mehrabi, Yadollah
    Azizi, Fereidoun
    Temporal Changes in Anthropometric Parametersand Lipid Profile according to Body Mass Indexamong an Adult Iranian Urban Population2008In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 53, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine changes in anthropometric parametersand lipid profiles over a period of 3.6 years in an Iranian adultpopulation according to body mass index (BMI) groups.Methods: Between 1998 and 2001 (phase 1) and 2002 and2005 (phase 2), 5,618 nondiabetic Iranian adults aged 6 20years were examined. Analysis of covariance was used to delineatetrends in anthropometric parameters as well as totaland low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC, LDL-Cand HDL-C, respectively) across BMI groups. Results: AlthoughBMI increased in women, this increase was not significantin obese persons. Among the men, however, a significantincrease in BMI was observed only in lean persons.Waist circumference (WC) increased across all BMI groupsin both sexes. A significant decrease was observed in TC[men: –0.83 mmol/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) –1.27 to–0.40; women: –0.78 mmol/l, CI –0.97 to –0.60] and LDL-C(men: –0.63 mmol/l, CI –1.13 to –0.13; women: –0.51 mmol/l,CI –0.78 to –0.24). A significant decrease in mean HDL-Cwas observed only among men (–0.09 mmol/l, CI –0.13to –0.04), with no difference among BMI groups (p = 0.3).There were no significant decreases in TC/HDL-C and LDLC/HDL-C ratios in men or women. Conclusions: Despite an 

    increase in WC, favorable trends were observed in TC andLDL-C levels. The favorable trend in TC levels was counterbalancedby changes in HDL-C, as reflected by the absence of asignificant decrease in TC/HDL-C or LDL-C/HDL-C

  • 2.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Iron requirements in infancy2011In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 59-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide and infants constitute a risk group due to their high iron requirements. Iron is critical for brain development, and case control studies have shown a consistent association between iron deficiency anemia in infancy and poor neurodevelopment, suggesting that it is important to prevent iron deficiency anemia in infants. However, it is also important to avoid excessive iron intakes which may have adverse effects on growth. Due to redistribution of iron from hemoglobin to iron stores, healthy, term, normal birth weight infants are virtually self-sufficient with regard to iron during the first 6 months of life. After that age, iron becomes a critical nutrient. The estimated daily iron requirements at the age of 6-12 months (0.9-1.3 mg/kg body weight) are higher than during any other period of life. Exclusively breast-fed infants normally do not need additional iron until 6 months of life. Formula-fed infants should receive iron-fortified formula. Low birth weight infants should receive additional iron supplements from an early age. From 6 months of age, all infants should receive a sufficient intake of iron-rich (complementary) foods, which may be meat products or iron-fortified foods. The estimations of iron requirements in infants have a weak evidence base and current European and American recommendations for infants differ significantly. To further clarify iron requirements in infants, there is clearly a need for randomized, controlled trials assessing the effects of different iron intake on anemia, neurodevelopment, and other health outcomes.

  • 3.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Meeting the iron needs of low and very low birth weight infants2017In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 71, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low birth weight (LBW), defined as a birth weight of < 2,500 g, affects 16% of all newborns and is a risk factor for impaired neurodevelopment as well as adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes, including hypertension. LBW infants include both term, small for gestational age infants and preterm infants. Most LBW infants have only marginally LBW (2,000-2,500 g). Recent advances in neonatal care have significantly improved the survival of very LBW (VLBW) infants (< 1,500 g). LBW infants are at high risk of iron deficiency due to low iron stores at birth and higher iron requirements due to rapid growth. Using a factorial approach, iron requirements of LBW infants have been estimated to be 1-2 mg/kg/day, which is much higher than the requirements of term, normal birth weight infants, who need almost no dietary iron during the first 6 months of life. In VLBW infants, blood losses and blood transfusions related to neonatal intensive care, as well as erythropoietin treatment, will greatly influence iron status and iron requirements. The timing of umbilical cord clamping at birth is of great importance for the amount of blood transfused from the placenta to the newborn and thereby total body iron. Delayed cord clamping of LBW infants is associated with less need for blood transfusion, less intraventricular hemorrhage, and less necrotizing enterocolitis. Randomized controlled trials have shown that an iron intake of 1-3 mg/kg/day (1-2 mg for marginally LBW and 2-3 mg for VLBW) is needed to effectively prevent iron deficiency. There is some recent evidence that these levels of iron intake will prevent some of the negative health consequences associated with LBW, especially behavioral problems and other neurodevelopmental outcomes and possibly even hypertension. However, it is also important to avoid excessive iron intakes which have been associated with adverse effects in LBW infants.

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  • 4. Engeset, D.
    et al.
    Skeie, G.
    Olsen, A.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Dietary patterns and whole grain in Scandinavia. The HELGA project2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 341-341Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: In the recent years a trendwithin nutrition epidemiology has been to assess overall dietaryquality, often by identifying dietary patterns. The HELGAstudy population is based on samples of existing cohorts fromthe three Scandinavian countries. All three cohorts are part ofthe EPIC study. The aim of this study is to find a typical wholegrain pattern in Scandinavia and see if the pattern is similar inthe three countries.Methods: The associations among the variables were investigatedby factor analysis.Results: Both Norway and Sweden had two breakfast patternsand one dinner pattern. Both the countries had a healthybreakfast pattern including food items commonly consideredhealthy, such as fruit, yoghurt and breakfast cereals. However,coarse bread was the main item in a more traditional pattern for Norway, while it was a part of the healthy pattern inSweden. The second breakfast pattern in Sweden included unhealthyitems like white bread, cakes, sweets, soft drinks andalcohol. The dinner pattern was almost equal in Sweden andNorway. Denmark differed from the other Scandinavian countriesconcerning dietary patterns. Only one breakfast patternwas found. This pattern had some similarities with the traditionalNorwegian pattern, but scored high on all whole grainitems while in Norway only wheat had a high score. Two dinnerpatterns are seen for Denmark, the healthier one includesfruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, the second includes meatand meat products, ice cream and alcohol.Conclusions: When comparing dietary patterns from thethree Scandinavian countries, we find both differences andsimilarities. The main whole grain item used in Norway andSweden seems to be wheat, while rye is more dominant in Denmark.

  • 5.
    Gil-Lespinard, Mercedes
    et al.
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Almanza-Aguilera, Enrique
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Castañeda, Jazmín
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Guiñón-Fort, Daniel
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Eriksen, Anne Kirstine
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) U1018, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) “Exposome, Heredity, Cancer and Health” Team, University of Paris-Saclay, Versailles Saint-Quentin-enYvelines University (UVSQ), Villejuif, France.
    Shah, Sanam
    Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) U1018, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) “Exposome, Heredity, Cancer and Health” Team, University of Paris-Saclay, Versailles Saint-Quentin-enYvelines University (UVSQ), Villejuif, France.
    Cadeau, Claire
    Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) U1018, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) “Exposome, Heredity, Cancer and Health” Team, University of Paris-Saclay, Versailles Saint-Quentin-enYvelines University (UVSQ), Villejuif, France.
    Katzke, Verena
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Johnson, Theron
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Nuthetal, Germany.
    Oliverio, Andreina
    Department of Epidemiology and Data Science, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Pasanisi, Fabrizio
    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Hyblean Association for Epidemiological Research (AIRE-ONLUS), Ragusa, Italy.
    Manfredi, Luca
    Centre for Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Public Health (C-BEPH), Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Orbassano, Italy.
    Masala, Giovana
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network (ISPRO), Florence, Italy.
    Skeie, Guri
    Department of Community Medicine, UIT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lundblad, Marie Wasmuth
    Department of Community Medicine, UIT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Brustad, Magritt
    Department of Community Medicine, UIT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; The Public Dental Health Service Competence Centre of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lasheras, Cristina
    Functional Biology Department, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Crous-Bou, Marta
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Campus of Cartuja, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INYTA) “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Colorado-Yohar, Sandra
    CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INYTA) “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; Research Group on Demography and Health, National Faculty of Public Health, University of Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia.
    Guevara, Marcela
    CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub-Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain; Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Nutrition and Epidemiology Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Merdas, Mira
    Nutrition and Epidemiology Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Debras, Charlotte
    Nutrition and Epidemiology Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Aglago, Elom K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Nutrition, Oslo New University College, Oslo, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Ulleval, Oslo, Norway.
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Nutrition, Food Sciences and Gastronomy, Nutrition and Food Safety Research Institute (INSA), Food Innovation Network (XIA), Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Plasma concentration of 36 (poly)phenols and prospective body weight change in participants from the EPIC cohort2024In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 87-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Dietary intake of (poly)phenols has been linked to reduced adiposity and body weight (BW) in several epidemiological studies. However, epidemiological evidence on (poly)phenol biomarkers, particularly plasma concentrations, is scarce. We aimed to investigate the associations between plasma (poly)phenols and prospective BW change in participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

    Methods: This study included 761 participants with data on BW at baseline and after 5 years of follow-up. Plasma concentrations of 36 (poly)phenols were measured at baseline using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations were assessed through general linear mixed models and multinomial logistic regression models, using change in BW as a continuous or as a categorical variable (BW loss, maintenance, gain), respectively. Plasma (poly)phenols were assessed as log2-transformed continuous variables. The false discovery rate (FDR) was used to control for multiple comparisons.

    Results: Doubling plasma (poly)phenol concentrations showed a borderline trend towards a positive association with BW loss. Plasma vanillic acid showed the strongest association (−0.53 kg/5 years; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.99, −0.07). Similar results were observed for plasma naringenin comparing BW loss versus BW maintenance (odds ratio: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.2). These results did not remain significant after FDR correction.

    Conclusion: Higher concentrations of plasma (poly)phenols suggested a tendency towards 5-year BW maintenance or loss. While certain associations seemed promising, they did not withstand FDR correction, indicating the need for caution in interpreting these results. Further studies using (poly) phenol biomarkers are needed to confirm these suggestive protective trends.

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  • 6.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Current Safety Standards in Infant Nutrition: A European Perspective2012In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 188-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foods intended specifically for infants and young children are considered under European community law and are defined in specific commission directives. In principal, these directives conclude that such foods must be safe, have a special composition, be distinguishable from normal foods, be suitable for fulfilling particular nutritional requirements, and should, when marketed, indicate such suitability. Since infant formulas are intended as the sole source of nutrition during the first months of life, their nutritional adequacy and safety are particularly strictly regulated. The Scientific Committee on Food report from 2003, on which the current commission directive is based, makes clear recommendations on how benefits, suitability, and safety of modifications beyond established standards should be documented and evaluated. These principles resulted in part from a workshop on characterization of infant food modifications in the EU and two position papers by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). These papers are reviewed below. Copyright (C) 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 7.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Editorial2012In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 60, no Suppl 2, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8. Jankovic, N.
    et al.
    Geelen, A.
    Kampman, E.
    de Groot, C. P.
    Pikhart, H.
    Huangfu, P.
    Bofetta, P.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    Kee, F.
    O'Doherty, M.
    Franco, O. H.
    Hooven van den, E. H.
    Rooij van, F.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Orfanos, P.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Gonzalez, C. A.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Peeters, P. H.
    Park, Y.
    Pajak, A.
    Malyutina, S.
    Kubinova, R.
    Feskens, E. J.
    ASSOCIATION BETWEEN A HEALTHY DIET ACCORDING TO WHO GUIDELINES AND ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY IN EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN ELDERLY, THE CHANCES PROJECT2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 234-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: The Healthy Diet Indicator(HDI) measures adherence to the WHO guidelines for preventingdiet related chronic diseases, and can be applied to assessassociations of diet with health across populations. We examinedthe association between the HDI and all-cause mortalityin European and American elderly people aged 60 years andabove.Methods: We analysed data on 395,863 men and womenfrom 11 prospective cohort studies from the Consortium onHealth and Ageing: Network of Cohorts In Europe And TheUnited States (CHANCES). Across cohorts, the follow-upperiods ranged from 10 to 20 yrs. Diet was assessed throughvalidated methods. For the translation of foods to nutrients,country specific food composition tables were used. The continuouslyscored HDI (range mean and SD HDI score 45±9to 54±7 across cohorts) was based on intakes of saturated andpolyunsaturated fatty acids, mono-and disaccharides, protein,cholesterol, dietary fibre and fruits and vegetables. The associationbetween the HDI and all-cause mortality was evaluated ineach cohort separately, by multiple Cox proportional hazardsregression. A pooled hazard ratio (HR) was subsequently estimatedusing a random-effects model.Results: Across all cohorts, 84,863 people died during4,492,298 person-years of follow-up. Adjusted HR of death, fora 10 point increment in HDI score, ranged between 0.81 (95%CI 0.77-0.86) in Denmark and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.84-1.16) in Poland.The pooled adjusted HR estimate showed a significantinverse association of 0.90 (95% CI 0.87-0.93) but there was asignificant heterogeneity between studies (p=0.001, I2=66%).Conclusion: Our results show that higher dietary quality isinversely associated with all- cause mortality but

  • 9. Koletzko, Berthold
    et al.
    Fewtrell, Mary
    Gibson, Robert
    van Goudoever, Johannes B.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Szajewska, Hania
    Shamir, Raanan
    Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an updated and revised summary of the 'core data set' that has been proposed to be recorded and reported in all clinical trials on infant nutrition by the recently formed Consensus Group on Outcome Measures Made in Paediatric Enteral Nutrition Clinical Trials (COMMENT). This core data set was developed based on a previous proposal by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition in 2003. It comprises confidential data to identify subjects and facilitate contact for further follow-up, data to characterize the cohort studied and data on withdrawals from the study, and some additional core data for all nutrition studies on preterm infants. We recommend that all studies on nutrition in infancy should collect and report this core data set to facilitate interpretation and comparison of results from clinical studies, and of systematic data evaluation and meta-analyses. Editors of journals publishing such reports are encouraged to require the reporting of the minimum data set described here either in the main body of the publication or as supplementary online material.

  • 10.
    Koletzko, Berthold
    et al.
    Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, University of Munich, Medical Centre, Lindwurmstrasse 4, DE-80337 Munich, Germany.
    Szajewska, Hania
    Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Ashwell, Margaret
    Ashwell Associates (Europe) Ltd., Ashwell, United Kingdom.
    Shamir, Raanan
    Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Aggett, Peter
    School of Medicine and Health, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Baerlocher, Kurt
    Ostschweizerisches Kinderspital, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Noakes, Paul
    School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Braegger, Christian
    Kinderspital, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Calder, Philip
    School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Campoy Folgoso, Cristina
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Colomb, Virginie
    Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades, Paris, France.
    Decsi, Tamás
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Dupont, Christophe
    Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades, Paris, France.
    Fewtrell, Mary
    Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Van Goudoever, Johannes B.
    Department of Paediatrics, VU University Medical, Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Michaelsen, Kim F.
    Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mihatsch, Walter
    Evangelisches Diakoniekrankenhaus, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany.
    Guarino, Alfredo
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Koletzko, Sibylle
    Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, University of Munich, Medical Centre, Lindwurmstrasse 4, DE-80337 Munich, Germany.
    Rigo, Jacques
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium.
    Turck, Dominique
    Jeanne de Flandre Children's Hospital, University of Lille, Lille, France.
    Taminiau, Jan
    Department of Paediatrics, VU University Medical, Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Documentation of functional and clinical effects of infant nutrition: setting the scene for comment2012In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 222-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Early Nutrition Academy and the Child Health Foundation, in collaboration with the Committee on Nutrition, European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, held a workshop in March 2011 to explore guidance on acquiring evidence on the effects of nutritional interventions in infants and young children. The four objectives were to (1) provide guidance on the quality and quantity of evidence needed to justify conclusions on functional and clinical effects of nutrition in infants and young children aged <3 years; (2) agree on a range of outcome measures relevant to nutrition trials in this age group for which agreed criteria are needed; (3) agree on an updated 'core data set' that should generally be recorded in nutrition trials in infants and young children, and (4) provide guidance on the use of surrogate markers in paediatric nutrition research. The participants discussed these objectives and agreed to set up six first working groups under the auspices of the Consensus Group on Outcome Measures Made in Paediatric Enteral Nutrition Clinical Trials (COMMENT). Five groups will aim to identify and define criteria for assessing key outcomes, i.e. growth, acute diarrhoea, atopic dermatitis and cows' milk protein allergy, infections and 'gut comfort'. The sixth group will review and update the 'core data set'. The COMMENT Steering Committee will discuss and decide upon a method for reaching consensus which will be used by all working groups and plan to meet again within 2 years and to report and publish their conclusions. 

  • 11. Konrad, M.
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Gomes, A. M.
    Olsen, S.
    de Looy, A.
    DIETS2: EUROPEAN DIETETIC ADVANCED COMPETENCES-EDAC 20122013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, p. 1736-1737Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: DIETS2 (Dietitians ensuringeducation, teaching and professional quality) is an EU ThematicNetwork bring together an active network of dietetic (andnutrition) associations and higher education institutions. Theintention is to improve European nutritional health througheducation and practice. ‘Health 2020’ (WHO, 2012) calls fora new working culture fostering cooperation across Europe to enhance healthcare necessitating a great emphasis on lifelonglearning for health professionals. Advanced competencestandards for dietitians, which describe the higher levels ofknowledge and complex responsibilities required, have nowbeen developed.Methods: Invitation to access an on-line questionnaire(Lime-survey) was sent out via European Federation of Associationsof Dietitians (EFAD) and DIETS2 partners in 2011.The questionnaire collected information on demographics,working environments and identified second and third cycledietetic competences.Results: 2030 dietitians from 35 countries over a range ofoccupational fields; Clinical (66%), Public Health (35%), Administrative(30%), Higher Education Teaching (20%) and Research(18%) responded. Competences identified for working atadvanced level were Advanced Knowledge and Understandingof Dietetics; Dietetic Process and Professional Reasoning; ProfessionalRelationships; Professional Autonomy and Accountability;Educator Skills; Research and Development in Dieteticsand its Science; Leadership and Management of ProfessionalDietetics; Entrepreneurial Skills and Business Development ofDietetics. The identified advanced competences (EDAC, 2012)and their performance indicators are now accepted by EFADfor Pan-European application and form the basis for LifelongLearning for dietitians post qualification.Conclusions: The EDAC Framework represents the firstdefinition of the competences required by nutrition and dieteticprofessionals to meet the Health 2020 agenda and provides abenchmark against which health professionals and their clientscan judge their competence.

  • 12. Kyro, C.
    et al.
    Olsen, A.
    Landberg, R.
    Skeie, G.
    Loft, S.
    Aman, P.
    Leenders, M.
    Dik, V.
    Siersema, P.
    Pischon, T.
    Christensen, J.
    Overvad, K.
    Boutron-Ruault, M. C.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Cottet, V.
    Kuehn, T.
    ChangClaude, J.
    Boeing, H.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Bamia, C.
    Trichopoulos, D.
    Palli, D.
    Krogh, V.
    Tumino, R.
    Vineis, P.
    Panico, S.
    Peters, P.
    Weiderpass, E.
    Bakken, T.
    Asli, L.
    Argueelles, M.
    Jakszyn, P.
    Sanchez, M. J.
    Castano, J.
    Barricarte, A.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Key, T.
    Travis, R.
    Ferrari, P.
    Freisling, H.
    Jenab, M.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.
    ALKYLRESORCINOLS (BIOMARKERS OF WHOLE-GRAIN INTAKE) AND RISK OF COLORECTAL CANCER IN THE EUROPEAN PROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION INTO CANCER AND NUTRITION2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 1207-1208Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Few studies have investigatedthe association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer.Whole-grain products are one of the dietary items proneto measurement errors, making the use of objective measures,such as biomarkers, highly relevant. The objective of the studywas to investigate the association between biomarkers ofwhole-grain intake, alkylresorcinols, and colorectal cancer ina nested case-control study within the European ProspectiveInvestigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: We included 1372 first incident colorectal cancercases and 1372 individually matched controls and calculatedthe incidence rate ratios (IRR) for overall and sub-sites of colorectalcancer using conditional logistic regression adjusted forpotential confounders.Results: Plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations werenot associated with risk of overall colorectal cancer, proximalcolon cancer or rectal cancer. However, high plasma total alkylresorcinolconcentrations were statistically significantly associatedwith lower incidence of cancer located in the distal (leftor descending) part of the colon. Adjusted IRR of distal coloncancer for highest versus lowest quartile of plasma alkylresorcinolwas 0.48 (95% confidence interval = 0.28 to 0.83). Furthermore,we observed an inverse association with colon cancerfor the Scandinavian part of the participants. Alkylresorcinolsmay be more appropriate as biomarkers in Middle Europe andScandinavia i.e. in areas where whole grains are regularly consumed.Conclusions: Whole-grain intake, assessed by alkylresorcinols,was associated with a lower incidence of distal coloncancer. Alkylresorcinols seem useful as objective biomarkersof whole-grain intake in populations where whole-grains are astaple part of the diet. Acknowledgements: This work was supportedby World Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF)and WCRF Netherlands (WCRF NL) (2011/436), and NordForsk(Centre of Excellence programme HELGA (070015)).

  • 13. Mansoor, M Azam
    et al.
    Stea, Tonje Holte
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Reine, Andreas
    Early biochemical and hematological response to intramuscular cyanocobalamin therapy in vitamin B-12-deficient patients2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 347-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Data on early biochemical and hematological responses to cobalamin therapy in vitamin B-12-deficient patients are scarce. Therefore, we investigated whether cobalamin injections would include prompt biochemical and hematological responses in vitamin B-12-deficient patients.

    Subjects and Methods: Seven female patients (mean age: 69.4 years, range: 61-78) with a mean serum cobalamin level of 104 +/- 38 pmol/l mean +/- SD and 7 male patients (mean age: 67.0 years, range: 53-78) with a mean serum cobalamin level of 84 +/- 40 (+/- SD) participated in the study. They were administered 1 mg i.m. cyanocobalamin per week for 3 weeks. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after cobalamin injection. The concentrations of plasma aminothiols and serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, respectively, and hematological parameters were determined with a hematological analyzer.

    Results: Already 1 day after intramuscular Cobalamin injections, the concentrations of serum vitamin B-12 and plasma total cysteine were significantly increased while the concentrations of serum folate, plasma total homocysteine and serum MMA were decreased. Mean cell volume was also significantly decreased first after 14 days of therapy.

    Conclusion: Intramuscular cobalamin administration causes swift and significant changes in plasma aminothiols, whereas the first change in hematological parameters was detected only after 14 days. Copyright (C) 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 14. Skeie, G.
    et al.
    Braaten, T.
    Olsen, A.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Landberg, R.
    Asli, L. A.
    Bakken, T.
    Lund, E.
    Intake of whole grains and incidence of gastric and oesophageal cancer in the HELGA cohort2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 198-199Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Whole grains are a good sourceof dietary fibre, but beneficial effects might also stem fromother components of the grain. Very few studies exist on intakeof whole grains and incidence of stomach and oesophagealcancer, but studies on dietary fibre and these cancers suggesta protective effect. The objective of this work was to study theassociation between intake of whole grains and incidence ofoesophageal and gastric cancer. Methods: The Helga cohort has 120 000 participants fromthe Norwegian Women and Cancer study, The Northern Sweden Health and Disease study and the Danish Diet, Cancerand Health study, recruited in 1992-1999. After exclusions, 112cases of oesophageal cancer, 185 cases of gastric cancer and 113700 other cohort members were included in the analyses. Theyprovided dietary information in semi-quantitative FFQs at baseline,and also information about other risk factors. Cancer information was obtained by linkage to the respective cancerregistries. The association between whole grain intake and cancerwas analysed with Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The median whole-grain intake was 47.4 g/day(5th-95th percentile: 13.3-101.1) in the non-cases, 37.5 g/day(10.8-87.2) in oesophageal cancer cases, and 45.1 g/day (8.1-99.1) in gastric cancer cases. A decreased risk of oesophagealcancer was observed, HR=0.83 (CI 0.69-0.99) p=0.04 per 20g of whole grains. The HR for highest compared with lowesttertile of intake was 0.56 (0.32-0.97) p=0.03. The analyses wereadjusted for country, smoking status, age at baseline, sex, processedmeat, alcohol and vitamin C. No association was foundfor whole grains and gastric cancer.Conclusion: In this study, higher intake of whole grains wasassociated with lower risk of oesophageal cancer. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by NordForsk– Centre of excellence programme HELGA (070015).

  • 15.
    Sundell, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Nygren, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Plasma glucose and insulin, urinary catecholamine and cortisol responses to test breakfasts with high or low fibre content: the importance of the previous diet1989In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 60-hour high-carbohydrate (high-CHO) diet or a 36-hour low-carbohydrate (low-CHO) diet was followed by 24 healthy women in a cross-over design to modify liver glycogen content. Thereafter each subject was given a high-sucrose breakfast, a high-protein, high-fibre breakfast or no breakfast. The two different breakfasts evoked larger plasma glucose responses following the low-CHO diet than when following the high-CHO diet. When the two breakfasts followed the same pre-period diet, no significant differences were observed. We conclude that the composition of the previous diet influences the postprandial response to meals and that a standardised diet shortly before test meal studies is of importance for the results in this type of studies.

  • 16. Talvia, Sanna
    et al.
    Lagstrom, Hanna
    Laurinen, Maarit
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
    Wergedahl, Hege
    Olafsdottir, Anna Sigriour
    Assessing School Meals intake by Digital Photograph Method in the Nordic Contexts (the Promeal study)2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, p. 258-258Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    West, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Introduction of Complementary Foods to Infants2017In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 70, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While earlier food allergy prevention strategies implemented avoidance of allergenic foods in infancy, the current paradigm is shifting from avoidance to controlled exposure. This review focuses on the outcome of recent randomized controlled trials, which have examined the early introduction of allergenic foods for allergy prevention, and discusses the implementation of results in clinical practice. In infants at high risk of allergic disease, there is now direct evidence that regular early peanut consumption will reduce the prevalence of peanut allergy, compared to avoidance. Many international infant feeding guidelines already recommend complementary foods, including allergenic foods, to be introduced from 4 to 6 months of age irrespective of family history risk. Interim guidelines from 10 International Pediatric Allergy Associations state that healthcare providers should recommend the introduction of peanut-containing products into the diets of infants at high risk of allergic disease in countries where peanut allergy is prevalent. Direct translation of the results obtained from a cohort of high-risk infants to the general population has proved difficult, and issues regarding feasibility, safety, and cost-effectiveness have been raised. Five randomized placebo-controlled trials have assessed the effects of early egg exposure in infancy with varying results. In a recent comprehensive meta-analysis, there was moderate-certainty evidence that early versus late introduction of egg was associated with a reduced egg allergy risk. Although promising, optimal timing, doses, and if the feeding regimen should be stratified according to infant allergy risk remain to be determined. The single study that assessed introduction of multiple foods from 3 months whilst breastfeeding compared with exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age showed no reduction in food allergy prevalence. Future research should aim at optimizing infant feeding regimens and support a tolerogenic gastrointestinal microenvironment during the period of food allergen introduction. 

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