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  • 1. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H.
    Lau, Ching C.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Merrell, Ryan T.
    Davis, Faith G.
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC)2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1352-1358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alpha-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Oji, Yusuke
    Ohlson, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wang, Sihan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Ottander, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sugiyama, Haruo
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Prognostic significance of specific anti-WT1 IgG antibody level in plasma in patients with ovarian carcinoma2014In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 909-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) has a poor prognosis and lack early effective screening markers. Wilm's tumor gene 1 (WT1) is overexpressed in OCs. Therefore, it is of great interest to investigate whether WT1-specific antibody (Ab) measurements in plasma can serve as a biomarker of anti-OC response, and is of importance in relation to patient prognosis. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from a total of 103 women with ovarian tumors with median being 1 day (range 0-48 days) before operation. WT1 IgG Ab levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemical analysis of WT1 protein expression was performed on OC tissue samples. We found that low-WT1 Ab level in plasma was related to improved survival in patients diagnosed at stages III-IV and grade 3 carcinomas. Positive WT1 protein staining on OC tissue samples had a negative impact on survival in the entire cohort, both overall survival (OS) (P = 0.046) and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.006), but not in the serous OC subtype. Combining WT1 IgG Ab levels and WT1 staining, patients with high-WT1 IgG Ab levels in plasma and positive WT1 protein staining in cancer tissues had shorter survival, with a significant association in PFS (P = 0.016). These results indicated that WT1 Ab measurements in plasma and WT1 staining in tissue specimens could be useful as biomarkers for patient outcome in the high-risk subtypes of OCs for postoperative individualized therapy.

  • 3. Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Moller, Henrik
    Garmo, Hans
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Lambe, Mats
    Hammar, Niklas
    Walldius, Göran
    Robinson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1307-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

  • 4. Chen, Dan
    et al.
    Hammer, Joanna
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Idahl, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    A variant upstream of HLA-DRB1 and multiple variants in MICA influence susceptibility to cervical cancer in a Swedish population2014In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 190-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a genome-wide association study, we have previously identified and performed the initial replication of three novel susceptibility loci for cervical cancer: rs9272143 upstream of HLA-DRB1, rs2516448 adjacent to MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA), and rs3117027 at HLA-DPB2. The risk allele T of rs2516448 is in perfect linkage disequilibrium with a frameshift mutation (A5.1) in MICA exon 5, which results in a truncated protein. To validate these associations in an independent study and extend our prior work to MICA exon 5, we genotyped the single-nucleotide polymorphisms at rs9272143, rs2516448, rs3117027 and the MICA exon 5 microsatellite in a nested case–control study of 961 cervical cancer patients (827 carcinoma in situ and 134 invasive carcinoma) and 1725 controls from northern Sweden. The C allele of rs9272143 conferred protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.65–0.82; P = 1.6 × 10−7), which is associated with higher expression level of HLA-DRB1, whereas the T allele of rs2516448 increased the susceptibility to cervical cancer (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.19–1.49; P = 5.8 × 10−7), with the same association shown with MICA-A5.1. The direction and the magnitude of these associations were consistent with our previous findings. We also identified protective effects of the MICA-A4 (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 6.7 × 10−3) and MICA-A5 (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.50–0.72; P = 3.0 × 10−8) alleles. The associations with these variants are unlikely to be driven by the nearby human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. No association was observed between rs3117027 and risk of cervical cancer. Our results support the role of HLA-DRB1 and MICA in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer.

  • 5.
    Haider, Zahra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Köhn, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Flaegstad, Trond
    Kanerva, Jukka
    Heyman, Mats
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    An integrated transcriptome analysis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia links DNA methylation subgroups to dysregulated TAL1 and ANTP homeobox gene expression2019In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 311-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classification of pediatric T‐cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T‐ALL) patients into CIMP (CpG Island Methylator Phenotype) subgroups has the potential to improve current risk stratification. To investigate the biology behind these CIMP subgroups, diagnostic samples from Nordic pediatric T‐ALL patients were characterized by genome‐wide methylation arrays, followed by targeted exome sequencing, telomere length measurement, and RNA sequencing. The CIMP subgroups did not correlate significantly with variations in epigenetic regulators. However, the CIMP+ subgroup, associated with better prognosis, showed indicators of longer replicative history, including shorter telomere length (P = 0.015) and older epigenetic (P < 0.001) and mitotic age (P < 0.001). Moreover, the CIMP+ subgroup had significantly higher expression of ANTP homeobox oncogenes, namely TLX3, HOXA9, HOXA10, and NKX2‐1, and novel genes in T‐ALL biology including PLCB4, PLXND1, and MYO18B. The CIMP− subgroup, with worse prognosis, was associated with higher expression of TAL1 along with frequent STIL‐TAL1 fusions (2/40 in CIMP+ vs 11/24 in CIMP−), as well as stronger expression of BEX1. Altogether, our findings suggest different routes for leukemogenic transformation in the T‐ALL CIMP subgroups, indicated by different replicative histories and distinct methylomic and transcriptomic profiles. These novel findings can lead to new therapeutic strategies.

  • 6.
    Häggström, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Garmo, Hans
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Söderkvist, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Ströck, Viveka
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Survival after radiotherapy versus radical cystectomy for primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A Swedish nationwide population-based cohort study2019In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 2196-2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of survival comparing radical cystectomy (RC) and radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer have provided inconsistent results and have methodological limitations. The aim of the study was to investigate risk of death after radiotherapy as compared to RC.

    METHODS: We selected patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma without distant metastases, treated with radiotherapy or RC from 1997 to 2014 in the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe) and estimated absolute and relative risk of bladder cancer death and all-cause death. In a group of patients, theoretically eligible for a trial comparing radiotherapy and RC, we calculated risk difference in an instrumental variable analysis. We have not investigated chemoradiotherapy as this treatment was not used in the study time period.

    RESULTS: The study included 3 309 patients, of those 17% were treated with radiotherapy and 83% with RC. Patients treated with radiotherapy were older, had more advanced comorbidity, and had a higher risk of death as compared to patients treated with RC (relative risks of 1.5-1.6). In the "trial population," all-cause death risk difference was 6 per 100 patients lower after radiotherapy at 5 years of follow-up, 95% confidence interval -41 to 29.

    CONCLUSION(S): Patient selection between the treatments make it difficult to evaluate results from conventionally adjusted and propensity-score matched survival analysis. When taking into account unmeasured confounding by instrumental variable analysis, no differences in survival was found between the treatments for a selected group of patients. Further clinical studies are needed to characterize this group of patients, which can serve as a basis for future comparison studies for treatment recommendations.

  • 7. Lupo, Philip J.
    et al.
    Danysh, Heather E.
    Plon, Sharon E.
    Curtin, Karen
    Malkin, David
    Hettmer, Simone
    Hawkins, Douglas S.
    Skapek, Stephen X.
    Spector, Logan G.
    Papworth, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Erhardt, Erik B.
    Grufferman, Seymour
    Schiffman, Joshua D.
    Family history of cancer and childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group and the Utah Population Database2015In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 781-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little is known about the epidemiology and factors underlying susceptibility to childhood rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). To better characterize genetic susceptibility to childhood RMS, we evaluated the role of family history of cancer using data from the largest case-control study of RMS and the Utah Population Database (UPDB). RMS cases (n=322) were obtained from the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Population-based controls (n=322) were pair-matched to cases on race, sex, and age. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between family history of cancer and childhood RMS. The results were validated using the UPDB, from which 130 RMS cases were identified and matched to controls (n=1300) on sex and year of birth. The results were combined to generate summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Having a first-degree relative with a cancer history was more common in RMS cases than controls (ORs=1.39, 95% CI: 0.97-1.98). Notably, this association was stronger among those with embryonal RMS (ORs=2.44, 95% CI: 1.54-3.86). Moreover, having a first-degree relative who was younger at diagnosis of cancer (<30years) was associated with a greater risk of RMS (ORs=2.37, 95% CI: 1.34-4.18). In the largest analysis of its kind, we found that most children diagnosed with RMS did not have a family history of cancer. However, our results indicate an increased risk of RMS (particularly embryonal RMS) in children who have a first-degree relative with cancer, and among those whose relatives were diagnosed with cancer at <30years of age.

  • 8.
    Näsman, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordfors, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Grün, Nathalie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Munck-Wikland, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ramqvist, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Marklund, Linda
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Dalianis, Tina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Absent/weak CD44 intensity and positive human papillomavirus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma indicates a very high survival2013In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 507-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with human papillomavirus DNA positive (HPVDNA+) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have better clinical outcome than those with HPV DNA negative (HPVDNA-) OSCC upon intensive oncological treatment. All HPVDNA+ OSCC patients may not require intensive treatment, however, but before potentially deintensifying treatment, additional predictive markers are needed. Here, we examined HPV, p16(INK4a), and CD44 in OSCC in correlation to clinical outcome. Pretreatment tumors from 290 OSCC patients, the majority not receiving chemotherapy, were analyzed for HPV DNA by Luminex and for p16(INK4a) and CD44 by immunohistochemistry. 225/290 (78%) tumors were HPVDNA+ and 211/290 (73%) overexpressed p16(INK4a), which correlated to presence of HPV (P < 0.0001). Presence of HPV DNA, absent/weak CD44 intensity staining correlated to favorable 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) by univariate and multivariate analysis, and likewise for p16(INK4a) by univariate analysis. Upon stratification for HPV, HPVDNA+ OSCC with absent/weak CD44 intensity presented the significantly best 3-year DFS and OS, with >95% 3-year DFS and OS. Furthermore, in HPVDNA+ OSCC, p16(INK4a)+ overexpression correlated to a favorable 3-year OS. In conclusion, patients with HPVDNA+ and absent/weak CD44 intensity OSCC presented the best survival and this marker combination could possibly be used for selecting patients for tailored deintensified treatment in prospective clinical trials. Absence of/weak CD44 or presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA was shown as a favorable prognostic factors in tonsillar and tongue base cancer. Moreover, patients with the combination of absence of/weak CD44 and presence of HPV DNA presented a very favorable outcome. Therefore, we suggest that this marker combination could potentially be used to single out patients with a high survival that could benefit from a de-escalated oncological treatment.

  • 9.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Plasma miRNA can detect colorectal cancer, but how early?2018In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 1697-1705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of deaths worldwide but has a good prognosis if detected early. The need for efficient, preferable non‐ or minimally invasive, inexpensive screening tools is therefore critical. We analyzed 12 miRNAs in pre‐ and postdiagnostic plasma samples to evaluate their potential as CRC screening markers. We used a unique study design with two overlapping cohorts, allowing analysis of pre‐ and postdiagnostic samples from 58 patients with CRC and matched healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of miR‐15b, ‐16, ‐18a, ‐19a, 21, ‐22, ‐25, ‐26a, ‐29c, ‐142‐5p, ‐150, and ‐192 were measured by semi‐quantitative real‐time PCR. Concentrations of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 in plasma from patients with CRC were significantly altered compared to healthy controls. Combined as a multimarker panel, they detected CRC with an AUC of 0.93. Furthermore, levels of these three miRNAs also showed different levels in the prediagnostic case samples close to diagnosis. Only miR‐21‐levels were elevated several years before diagnosis. Plasma levels of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 show promise as screening biomarkers for CRC. However, based on our unique analysis of prediagnostic and postdiagnostic samples from the same patients, we conclude that circulating miRNAs elevated at diagnosis may not automatically be suitable for CRC screening, if the increase occurs too close to clinical diagnosis.

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