Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 21 of 21
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H.
    Lau, Ching C.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Merrell, Ryan T.
    Davis, Faith G.
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC)2016Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, nr 6, s. 1352-1358Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alpha-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Oji, Yusuke
    Ohlson, Nina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Wang, Sihan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Klinisk kemi.
    Ottander, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Obstetrik och gynekologi.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Sugiyama, Haruo
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Klinisk kemi.
    Prognostic significance of specific anti-WT1 IgG antibody level in plasma in patients with ovarian carcinoma2014Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 909-918Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) has a poor prognosis and lack early effective screening markers. Wilm's tumor gene 1 (WT1) is overexpressed in OCs. Therefore, it is of great interest to investigate whether WT1-specific antibody (Ab) measurements in plasma can serve as a biomarker of anti-OC response, and is of importance in relation to patient prognosis. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from a total of 103 women with ovarian tumors with median being 1 day (range 0-48 days) before operation. WT1 IgG Ab levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemical analysis of WT1 protein expression was performed on OC tissue samples. We found that low-WT1 Ab level in plasma was related to improved survival in patients diagnosed at stages III-IV and grade 3 carcinomas. Positive WT1 protein staining on OC tissue samples had a negative impact on survival in the entire cohort, both overall survival (OS) (P = 0.046) and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.006), but not in the serous OC subtype. Combining WT1 IgG Ab levels and WT1 staining, patients with high-WT1 IgG Ab levels in plasma and positive WT1 protein staining in cancer tissues had shorter survival, with a significant association in PFS (P = 0.016). These results indicated that WT1 Ab measurements in plasma and WT1 staining in tissue specimens could be useful as biomarkers for patient outcome in the high-risk subtypes of OCs for postoperative individualized therapy.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Moller, Henrik
    Garmo, Hans
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Lambe, Mats
    Hammar, Niklas
    Walldius, Göran
    Robinson, David
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, nr 6, s. 1307-1318Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Bergström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery and Urology, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roy, Ricky
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedman, Christel
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; R&D Department, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Regional Cancer Center, Mid-Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Olof
    Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Division, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Department of Gynecologic Cancer, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Department of Radiation Science and Oncology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; School of Health and Psychological Sciences, City, University of London, London, United Kingdom; Medical Unit Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Do young adults with cancer receive information about treatment-related impact on sex life?: Results from a population-based study2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 8, s. 9893-9901Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is common following a cancer diagnosis in young adulthood (18–39 years) and problems related to sex life are ranked among the core concerns in this age group. Yet, few studies have investigated to what extent adults younger than 40, receive information from healthcare providers about the potential impact of cancer and its treatment on their sex life.

    Methods: A population-based cross-sectional survey study was conducted with 1010 young adults 1.5 years after being diagnosed with cancer (response rate 67%). Patients with breast, cervical, ovarian and testicular cancer, lymphoma, and brain tumors were identified in national quality registries. Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with receiving information were examined using multivariable binary logistic regression.

    Results: Men to a higher extent than women reported having received information about potential cancer-related impact on their sex life (68% vs. 54%, p < 0.001). Receipt of information varied across diagnoses; in separate regression models, using lymphoma as reference, both women and men with brain tumors were less likely to receive information (women: OR 0.10, CI = 0.03–0.30; men: OR 0.37, CI = 0.16–0.85). More intensive treatment was associated with higher odds of receiving information in both women (OR 1.89; CI = 1.28–2.79) and men (OR 2.08; CI = 1.09–3.94). None of the sociodemographic factors were associated with receipt of information.

    Conclusions: To improve sexual health communication to young adults with cancer, we recommend diagnosis-specific routines that clarify when in the disease trajectory to discuss these issues with patients and what to address in these conversations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5. Chen, Dan
    et al.
    Hammer, Joanna
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Idahl, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Obstetrik och gynekologi.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    A variant upstream of HLA-DRB1 and multiple variants in MICA influence susceptibility to cervical cancer in a Swedish population2014Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 190-198Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In a genome-wide association study, we have previously identified and performed the initial replication of three novel susceptibility loci for cervical cancer: rs9272143 upstream of HLA-DRB1, rs2516448 adjacent to MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA), and rs3117027 at HLA-DPB2. The risk allele T of rs2516448 is in perfect linkage disequilibrium with a frameshift mutation (A5.1) in MICA exon 5, which results in a truncated protein. To validate these associations in an independent study and extend our prior work to MICA exon 5, we genotyped the single-nucleotide polymorphisms at rs9272143, rs2516448, rs3117027 and the MICA exon 5 microsatellite in a nested case–control study of 961 cervical cancer patients (827 carcinoma in situ and 134 invasive carcinoma) and 1725 controls from northern Sweden. The C allele of rs9272143 conferred protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.65–0.82; P = 1.6 × 10−7), which is associated with higher expression level of HLA-DRB1, whereas the T allele of rs2516448 increased the susceptibility to cervical cancer (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.19–1.49; P = 5.8 × 10−7), with the same association shown with MICA-A5.1. The direction and the magnitude of these associations were consistent with our previous findings. We also identified protective effects of the MICA-A4 (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 6.7 × 10−3) and MICA-A5 (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.50–0.72; P = 3.0 × 10−8) alleles. The associations with these variants are unlikely to be driven by the nearby human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. No association was observed between rs3117027 and risk of cervical cancer. Our results support the role of HLA-DRB1 and MICA in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Clasen, Joanna L.
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Mabunda, Rita
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Katzke, Verena
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Nuthetal, Germany.
    Birukov, Anna
    German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Muenchen-Neuherberg, Germany; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States.
    Tagliabue, Giovanna
    Cancer Registry Unit, Department of Research, Milan, Italy.
    Chiodini, Paolo
    Medical Statistics Unit, University L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Hyblean Association for Epidemiological Research (AIRE -ONLUS), Ragusa, Italy.
    Milani, Lorenzo
    Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Gram, Inger
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lukic, Marko
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Luján-Barroso, Leila
    Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain.
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain; Biodonostia Health Research Institute, Epidemiology of Chronic and Communicable Diseases Group, San Sebastián, Spain.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Huss, Linnea
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Urologi och andrologi.
    Travis, Ruth
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Smith-Byrne, Karl
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Gunter, Marc
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Johansson, Matthias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Riboli, Elio
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Muller, David C.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Reproductive and hormonal factors and risk of renal cell carcinoma among women in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 14, s. 15588-15600Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is twice as common among men compared with women, and hormonal factors have been suggested to partially explain this difference. There is currently little evidence on the roles of reproductive and hormonal risk factors in RCC aetiology.

    Materials & Methods: We investigated associations of age at menarche and age at menopause, pregnancy-related factors, hysterectomy and ovariectomy and exogenous hormone use with RCC risk among 298,042 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

    Results: During 15 years of follow-up, 438 RCC cases were identified. Parous women had higher rates of RCC compared with nulliparous women (HR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.18, 2.46), and women who were older at age of first pregnancy had lower rates of RCC (30 years + vs. <20 years HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.34, 0.82). Additionally, we identified a positive association for hysterectomy (HR = 1.43 95% CI 1.09, 1.86) and bilateral ovariectomy (HR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.13, 2.47), but not unilateral ovariectomy (HR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.61, 1.62) with RCC risk. No clear associations were found for age at menarche, age at menopause or exogenous hormone use.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that parity and reproductive organ surgeries may play a role in RCC aetiology.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Haider, Zahra
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Köhn, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Flaegstad, Trond
    Kanerva, Jukka
    Heyman, Mats
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    An integrated transcriptome analysis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia links DNA methylation subgroups to dysregulated TAL1 and ANTP homeobox gene expression2019Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 311-324Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Classification of pediatric T‐cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T‐ALL) patients into CIMP (CpG Island Methylator Phenotype) subgroups has the potential to improve current risk stratification. To investigate the biology behind these CIMP subgroups, diagnostic samples from Nordic pediatric T‐ALL patients were characterized by genome‐wide methylation arrays, followed by targeted exome sequencing, telomere length measurement, and RNA sequencing. The CIMP subgroups did not correlate significantly with variations in epigenetic regulators. However, the CIMP+ subgroup, associated with better prognosis, showed indicators of longer replicative history, including shorter telomere length (P = 0.015) and older epigenetic (P < 0.001) and mitotic age (P < 0.001). Moreover, the CIMP+ subgroup had significantly higher expression of ANTP homeobox oncogenes, namely TLX3, HOXA9, HOXA10, and NKX2‐1, and novel genes in T‐ALL biology including PLCB4, PLXND1, and MYO18B. The CIMP− subgroup, with worse prognosis, was associated with higher expression of TAL1 along with frequent STIL‐TAL1 fusions (2/40 in CIMP+ vs 11/24 in CIMP−), as well as stronger expression of BEX1. Altogether, our findings suggest different routes for leukemogenic transformation in the T‐ALL CIMP subgroups, indicated by different replicative histories and distinct methylomic and transcriptomic profiles. These novel findings can lead to new therapeutic strategies.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Häggström, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Garmo, Hans
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Söderkvist, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Ströck, Viveka
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Survival after radiotherapy versus radical cystectomy for primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A Swedish nationwide population-based cohort study2019Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, nr 5, s. 2196-2204Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of survival comparing radical cystectomy (RC) and radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer have provided inconsistent results and have methodological limitations. The aim of the study was to investigate risk of death after radiotherapy as compared to RC.

    METHODS: We selected patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma without distant metastases, treated with radiotherapy or RC from 1997 to 2014 in the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe) and estimated absolute and relative risk of bladder cancer death and all-cause death. In a group of patients, theoretically eligible for a trial comparing radiotherapy and RC, we calculated risk difference in an instrumental variable analysis. We have not investigated chemoradiotherapy as this treatment was not used in the study time period.

    RESULTS: The study included 3 309 patients, of those 17% were treated with radiotherapy and 83% with RC. Patients treated with radiotherapy were older, had more advanced comorbidity, and had a higher risk of death as compared to patients treated with RC (relative risks of 1.5-1.6). In the "trial population," all-cause death risk difference was 6 per 100 patients lower after radiotherapy at 5 years of follow-up, 95% confidence interval -41 to 29.

    CONCLUSION(S): Patient selection between the treatments make it difficult to evaluate results from conventionally adjusted and propensity-score matched survival analysis. When taking into account unmeasured confounding by instrumental variable analysis, no differences in survival was found between the treatments for a selected group of patients. Further clinical studies are needed to characterize this group of patients, which can serve as a basis for future comparison studies for treatment recommendations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Häggström, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Rowley, Mark
    Saddle Point Science, York, United Kingdom; Saddle Point Science Europe, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Coolen, Anthony C. C.
    Saddle Point Science, York, United Kingdom; Saddle Point Science Europe, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Donders Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Latent heterogeneity of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patient characteristics and survival: a population-based nation-wide study in the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe)2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 12, s. 13856-13864Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) constitute a heterogenous group in terms of patient and tumour characteristics (‘case-mix’) and prognosis. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether differences in survival could be used to separate MIBC patients into separate classes using a recently developed latent class regression method for survival analysis with competing risks.

    Methods: We selected all participants diagnosed with MIBC in the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBase) and analysed inter-patient heterogeneity in risk of death from bladder cancer and other causes.

    Results: Using data from 9653 MIBC patients, we detected heterogeneity with six distinct latent classes in the studied population. The largest, and most frail class included 50% of the study population and was characterised by a somewhat larger proportion of women, higher age at diagnosis, more advanced disease and lower probability of curative treatment. Despite this, patients in this class treated with curative intent by radical cystectomy or radiotherapy had a lower association to risk of death. The second largest class included 23% and was substantially less frail as compared to the largest class. The third and fourth class included each around 9%–10%, whereas the fifth and sixth class included each 3%–4% of the population.

    Conclusions: Results from the current study are compatible with previous research and the method can be used to adjust comparisons in prognosis between MIBC populations for influential differences in the distribution of sub-classes.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Jochems, Sylvia H. J.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fritz, Josef
    Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Institute of Medical Statistics and Informatics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Stattin, Pär
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Prediagnostic markers of insulin resistance and prostate cancer risk and death: a pooled study2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 12, s. 13732-13744Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Insulin resistance has been shown to be related to a higher risk of several cancers, but the association with prostate cancer (PCa) has been inconsistent.

    Methods: We investigated prediagnostic markers of insulin resistance in men in four cohorts in Sweden, in relation to PCa risk (total, non-aggressive and aggressive) and PCa death using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression. The number of men, PCa cases and PCa deaths was up to 66,668, 3940 and 473 for plasma glucose and the triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index, and up to 3898, 586 and 102 for plasma insulin, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and leptin.

    Results: Higher HbA1c was related to a lower risk of non-aggressive PCa but no significant associations were found for insulin resistance markers with the risk of aggressive or total PCa. In PCa cases, higher glucose and TyG index were related to a higher risk of PCa death (hazard ratio [HR] per higher standard deviation, 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49 and 1.24, 95% CI 1.00–1.55), which further increased when restricting the analyses to glucose and TyG index measures taken <10 years before the PCa diagnosis (HR, 1.70, 95% CI 1.09–2.70 and 1.66, 95% CI 1.12–2.51). No associations were observed for other markers in relation to PCa death.

    Conclusions: The results of this study showed no associations of insulin resistance markers with the risk of clinically relevant PCa, but higher glucose and TyG index were associated with poorer survival from PCa. The lack of association for other insulin resistance markers may be due to their smaller sample size.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Jochems, Sylvia H. J.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wood, Angela M.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Waist circumference and a body shape index and prostate cancer risk and mortality2021Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 10, nr 8, s. 2885-2896Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently found a negative association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of localised prostate cancer (PCa), no association with advanced PCa, and a positive association with PCa‐specific mortality. In a 15% subpopulation of that study, we here investigated the measures of abdominal adiposity including waist circumference (WC) and A Body Shape Index (ABSI) in relation to PCa risk and mortality. We used data from 58,457 men from four Swedish cohorts to assess WC and ABSI in relation to PCa risk according to cancer risk category, including localised asymptomatic and symptomatic PCa and advanced PCa, and PCa‐specific mortality. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During, on average, 10 years of follow‐up, 3290 men were diagnosed with PCa and 387 died of PCa. WC was negatively associated with the risk of total PCa (HR per 10 cm, 0.95; 95% CI 0.92–0.99), localised PCa (HR per 10 cm, 0.93, 95% CI 0.88–0.96) and localised asymptomatic PCa cases detected through a prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) test (HR per 10 cm, 0.87, 95% CI 0.81–0.94). WC was not associated with the risk of advanced PCa (HR per 10 cm, 1.02, 95% CI 0.93–1.14) or with PCa‐specific mortality (HR per 10 cm, 1.04, 95% CI 0.92–1.19). ABSI showed no associations with the risk of PCa or PCa‐specific mortality. While the negative association between WC and the risk of localised PCa was partially driven by PSA‐detected PCa cases, no association was found between abdominal adiposity and clinically manifest PCa in our population.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12. Lupo, Philip J.
    et al.
    Danysh, Heather E.
    Plon, Sharon E.
    Curtin, Karen
    Malkin, David
    Hettmer, Simone
    Hawkins, Douglas S.
    Skapek, Stephen X.
    Spector, Logan G.
    Papworth, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Erhardt, Erik B.
    Grufferman, Seymour
    Schiffman, Joshua D.
    Family history of cancer and childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group and the Utah Population Database2015Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 4, nr 5, s. 781-790Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little is known about the epidemiology and factors underlying susceptibility to childhood rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). To better characterize genetic susceptibility to childhood RMS, we evaluated the role of family history of cancer using data from the largest case-control study of RMS and the Utah Population Database (UPDB). RMS cases (n=322) were obtained from the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Population-based controls (n=322) were pair-matched to cases on race, sex, and age. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between family history of cancer and childhood RMS. The results were validated using the UPDB, from which 130 RMS cases were identified and matched to controls (n=1300) on sex and year of birth. The results were combined to generate summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Having a first-degree relative with a cancer history was more common in RMS cases than controls (ORs=1.39, 95% CI: 0.97-1.98). Notably, this association was stronger among those with embryonal RMS (ORs=2.44, 95% CI: 1.54-3.86). Moreover, having a first-degree relative who was younger at diagnosis of cancer (<30years) was associated with a greater risk of RMS (ORs=2.37, 95% CI: 1.34-4.18). In the largest analysis of its kind, we found that most children diagnosed with RMS did not have a family history of cancer. However, our results indicate an increased risk of RMS (particularly embryonal RMS) in children who have a first-degree relative with cancer, and among those whose relatives were diagnosed with cancer at <30years of age.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Maric, Dora
    et al.
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Ficarra, Salvatore
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; Division of Population Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
    Di Bartolo, Luca
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Rossi, Carlo
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Asimakopoulou, Zoi
    University of Patras, Patras, Greece.
    Vantarakis, Apostolos
    University of Patras, Patras, Greece.
    Carbonell‐Baeza, Ana
    MOVE-IT Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain; Biomedical Research and Innovation Institute of Cadiz (INiBICA), Cadiz, Spain.
    Jiménez‐Pavón, David
    MOVE-IT Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain; Biomedical Research and Innovation Institute of Cadiz (INiBICA), Cadiz, Spain; CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain.
    Gomes, Beatriz
    Faculty of Sport Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Tavares, Paula
    Faculty of Sport Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Pusa, Susanna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Thaller, Petra
    Department of Health Consulting, Research and Science, Outdoor Against Cancer, München, Germany.
    Papakonstantinou, Sofia
    Creative Thinking Development—CRE.THI.DEV, Rafina, Greece.
    Kirkar, Musa
    CEIPES ETS, Palermo, Italy.
    Glorioso, Francesca
    Lega Italiana per la lotta Contro i Tumori (LILT Palermo), Palermo, Italy.
    Galioto, Marina
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Gentile, Ambra
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Thomas, Ewan
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Bianco, Antonino
    Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Effects of resistance training on sleep quality and disorders among individuals diagnosed with cancer: a systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials2024Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 13, nr 8, artikkel-id e7179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sleep disorders are often complained by cancer patients and can last years after the end of therapies, leading to different negative consequences. Non-pharmacological strategies such as exercise interventions may be considered to counteract this phenomenon. The literature supports the beneficial effects of aerobic training (AT), while evidence on resistance training (RT) is scarce. Accordingly, our systematic review aims to investigate the potential novel effect of RT on sleep outcomes in cancer survivors.

    Methods: The literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (Pubmed), Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, including only randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The screening procedure was conducted using the web-based software COVIDENCE. Sleep outcomes assessed through self-reported questionnaires or objective sleep measurements were extracted from RCTs recruiting cancer survivors of any age and gender, on or off treatment. The risk of bias (RoB) for each study was assessed using the Cochrane RoB 2 tool for RCTs. Meta-analytic syntheses were performed on sleep quality and insomnia.

    Results: A total of 21 studies were included in the review. Considering the mean percentage differences of all studies combined, promising positive results were found after combined aerobic and resistance exercise program (COMB) for sleep quality (−19%) and sleep disturbance (−17.3%). The meta-analysis results showed significant improvement for both sleep quality and insomnia (d = 0.28, SE: 0.11, Z = 2.51, p < 0.01, 95% CI: 0.07–0.49 and d = 0.43, SE: 0.20, Z = 2.18, p = 0.029, 95% CI: 0.07–0.49, respectively).

    Conclusion: RT interventions of 60 minutes per session, performed 2–3 times a week for 12 weeks, with exercise intensity ranging from 60% to 80% of one-repetition maximum can be administered to cancer survivors, aiming to improve sleep outcomes.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Näsman, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordfors, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Grün, Nathalie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Munck-Wikland, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ramqvist, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Marklund, Linda
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Dalianis, Tina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Absent/weak CD44 intensity and positive human papillomavirus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma indicates a very high survival2013Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 2, nr 4, s. 507-18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with human papillomavirus DNA positive (HPVDNA+) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have better clinical outcome than those with HPV DNA negative (HPVDNA-) OSCC upon intensive oncological treatment. All HPVDNA+ OSCC patients may not require intensive treatment, however, but before potentially deintensifying treatment, additional predictive markers are needed. Here, we examined HPV, p16(INK4a), and CD44 in OSCC in correlation to clinical outcome. Pretreatment tumors from 290 OSCC patients, the majority not receiving chemotherapy, were analyzed for HPV DNA by Luminex and for p16(INK4a) and CD44 by immunohistochemistry. 225/290 (78%) tumors were HPVDNA+ and 211/290 (73%) overexpressed p16(INK4a), which correlated to presence of HPV (P < 0.0001). Presence of HPV DNA, absent/weak CD44 intensity staining correlated to favorable 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) by univariate and multivariate analysis, and likewise for p16(INK4a) by univariate analysis. Upon stratification for HPV, HPVDNA+ OSCC with absent/weak CD44 intensity presented the significantly best 3-year DFS and OS, with >95% 3-year DFS and OS. Furthermore, in HPVDNA+ OSCC, p16(INK4a)+ overexpression correlated to a favorable 3-year OS. In conclusion, patients with HPVDNA+ and absent/weak CD44 intensity OSCC presented the best survival and this marker combination could possibly be used for selecting patients for tailored deintensified treatment in prospective clinical trials. Absence of/weak CD44 or presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA was shown as a favorable prognostic factors in tonsillar and tongue base cancer. Moreover, patients with the combination of absence of/weak CD44 and presence of HPV DNA presented a very favorable outcome. Therefore, we suggest that this marker combination could potentially be used to single out patients with a high survival that could benefit from a de-escalated oncological treatment.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Russell, Beth
    et al.
    Hemelrijck, Mieke, V
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Holmberg, Lars
    Kumar, Pardeep
    Bellavia, Andrea
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A mediation analysis to explain socio-economic differences in bladder cancer survival2020Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 9, nr 20, s. 7477-7487Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study aims to disentangle heterogeneity in the survival of bladder cancer (BC) patients of different socioeconomic status (SES) by identifying potential mediators of the relationship.

    Methods: The Bladder Cancer Database Sweden (BladderBaSe) was used to select patients diagnosed between 1997 and 2014 with Tis/Ta-T4 disease. The education level was used as a proxy for SES. Accelerated failure time models were used to investigate the association between SES and survival. Mediation analysis was used to investigate potential mediators of the association also accounting for interaction.

    Results: The study included 37 755 patients from the BladderBaSe. Patients diagnosed with both non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) who had high SES were found to have increased overall and BC-specific survival, when compared to those with low SES. In the NMIBC patients, Charlson Comorbidity Index was found to mediate this relationship by 10% (percentage of the total effect explained by the mediator) and hospital type by 4%. The time from referral to TURBT was a considerable mediator (14%) in the MIBC patients only.

    Conclusions: Mediation analysis suggests that the association between SES and BC survival can be explained by several factors. The mediators identified were not, however, able to fully explain the theoretical causal pathway between SES and survival, therefore, future studies should also include the investigation of other possible mediators to help explain this relationship further. These results highlight the importance of standardization of clinical care across SES groups.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    et al.
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Overvad, Kim
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Eriksen, Anne Kirstine
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Katzke, Verena
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital, Turin, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Hyblean Association for Epidemiological Research, AIRE ONLUS, Ragusa, Italy.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Former senior scientist, Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Huerta, José M.
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Instituto de Salud Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain; Biodonostia Health Research Institute, Epidemiology of Chronic and Communicable Diseases Group, San Sebastián, Spain.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology - ICO, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; Nutrition and Cancer Group, Epidemiology, Public Health, Cancer Prevention and Palliative Care Program; Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute—IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
    Bjartell, Anders
    Department of Translational Medicine, Medical Faculty, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Protein and amino acid intakes in relation to prostate cancer risk and mortality: A prospective study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 4, s. 4725-4738Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association between protein intake and prostate cancer risk remains unclear.

    Aims: To prospectively investigate the associations of dietary intakes of total protein, protein from different dietary sources, and amino acids with prostate cancer risk and mortality.

    Methods: In 131,425 men from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, protein and amino acid intakes were estimated using validated dietary questionnaires. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    Results: During a mean follow-up of 14.2 years, 6939 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer and 914 died of the disease. Dairy protein was positively associated with overall prostate cancer risk in the three highest fifths compared to the lowest (HRQ3=1.14 (95% CI 1.05–1.23); HRQ4=1.09 (1.01–1.18); HRQ5=1.10 (1.02–1.19)); similar results were observed for yogurt protein (HRQ3=1.14 (1.05–1.24); HRQ4=1.09 (1.01–1.18); HRQ5=1.12 (1.04–1.21)). For egg protein intake and prostate cancer mortality, no association was observed by fifths, but there was suggestive evidence of a positive association in the analysis per standard deviation increment. There was no strong evidence of associations with different tumour subtypes.

    Discussion: Considering the weak associations and many tests, the results must be interpreted with caution.

    Conclusion: This study does not provide strong evidence for an association of intakes of total protein, protein from different dietary sources or amino acids with prostate cancer risk or mortality. However, our results may suggest some weak positive associations, which need to be confirmed in large-scale, pooled analyses of prospective data.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Skog, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Erik
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The role of a discussion forum within a web-based psychoeducational intervention focusing on sex and fertility: what do young adults communicate?2023Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 12, nr 16, s. 17273-17283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study sought to investigate interactive participation and content of a moderated discussion forum within a web-based psychoeducational intervention aimed at alleviating sexual dysfunction and fertility distress in young adults diagnosed with cancer.

    Methods: The study is part of the Fex-Can Young Adult randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which young adults with self-reported sexual dysfunction or fertility distress were invited to participate. This study focuses on RCT participants that were randomized into the intervention condition. Sociodemographics and clinical characteristics of intervention participants and level of activity in the intervention were analyzed with descriptive statistics and compared between subgroups ("high" and "low" activity participants). Inductive qualitative thematic analysis was used to analyze the posts in the discussion forum.

    Results: Of 135 intervention participants, 24% met the criteria for high activity participation. There were no statistically significant differences found in terms of clinical and sociodemographic characteristics between high and low activity participants. Ninety-one participants (67%) accessed the discussion forum, and 19 (14%) posted at least once. Posters shared intimate details of their experiences of sexuality and fertility following cancer. The thematic analysis of posts resulted in four themes: fertility fears, perceptions of the changed body, missing out on life, and importance of support and information.

    Conclusions: While a smaller proportion of participants posted in the discussion forum, a majority spent time reading posts (lurkers). Participants posting in the forum shared experiences of intimate relationships, body image, parenthood concerns, and support needs. The discussion forum was used by a majority of intervention participants, and provided appreciated support for those who posted in the forum. We therefore recommend similar interventions to include this opportunity for interaction and communication.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Teleka, Stanley
    et al.
    Jochems, Sylvia H. J.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wood, Angela M.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Stocks, Tanja
    Association between blood pressure and BMI with bladder cancer risk and mortality in 340,000 men in three Swedish cohorts2021Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 10, nr 4, s. 1431-1438Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relation between obesity, blood pressure (BP) and bladder cancer (BC) risk and mortality remains unclear, partially due to potential confounding by smoking, the strongest risk factor for BC, and not accounting for tumor stage and grade in such studies. We investigated body mass index (BMI) and BP in relation to BC risk by stage and grade, and BC‐specific mortality, including separately among never‐smokers aimed at minimizing confounding by smoking.

    Methods: We analyzed 338,910 men from three Swedish cohorts, with 4895 incident BC's (940 among never‐smokers) during follow‐up. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for smoking status. HRs for BMI and BP were corrected for their regression dilution ratios, calculated from 280,456 individuals with 758,641 observations.

    Results: Body mass index was positively associated with non‐muscle invasive BC (NMIBC, HR per 5 kg/m2, 1.10 [1.02–1.19]) and NMIBC grade 3 (HR 1.17 [1.01–1.34]) in the full cohort, with similar effect sizes, albeit non‐significant, among never‐smokers. Systolic BP was positively associated with muscle‐invasive BC (MIBC, HR per 10 mmHg, 1.25 [1.00–1.55]) and BC‐specific mortality (HR 1.10 [1.01–1.20]) among never‐smokers, with weaker and non‐significant associations in the full cohort.

    Conclusions: In an analyses of BMI, BP and BC risk by stage and grade among men, we found modest positive associations between BMI and NMIBC and NMIBC grade 3. SBP was positively associated with MIBC and BC‐specific mortality in an analysis of never‐smokers, which may reflect the association, un‐confounded by smoking, also in a broader population.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Thurin, Erik
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydén, Isabelle
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Thomas
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smits, Anja
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gulati, Sasha
    Department of Neurosurgery, St.Olavs University Hospital HF, Trondheim, Norway; Institute of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Department of Neurosurgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bartek, Jiri
    Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Salvesen, Øyvind
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Jakola, Asgeir S.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, St.Olavs University Hospital HF, Trondheim, Norway.
    Impact of meningioma surgery on use of antiepileptic, antidepressant, and sedative drugs: A Swedish nationwide matched cohort study2021Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 10, nr 9, s. 2967-2977Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Meningioma is the most common primary intracranial tumor and surgery is the main treatment modality. As death from lack of tumor control is rare, other outcome measures like anxiety, depression and post-operative epilepsy are becoming increasingly relevant. In this nationwide registry-based study we aimed to describe the use of antiepileptic drugs (AED), antidepressants and sedatives before and after surgical treatment of an intracranial meningioma compared to a control population, and to provide predictors for continued use of each drug-group two years after surgery.

    Methods: All adult patients with histopathologically verified intracranial meningiomas were identified in the Swedish Brain Tumor Registry and their data were linked to relevant national registries after assigning five matched controls to each patient. We analyzed the prescription patterns of antiepileptic drugs (AED), antidepressants and sedative drugs in the two years before and the two years following surgery.

    Results: For the 2070 patients and 10312 controls identified the use of AED, antidepressants and sedatives was comparable two years before surgery. AED use at time of surgery was higher for patients than for controls (22.2% vs. 1.9%, p < 0.01), as was antidepressant use (12.9% vs. 9.4%, p < 0.01). Both AED and antidepressant use remained elevated after surgery, with patients having a higher AED use (19.7% vs. 2.3%, p < 0.01) and antidepressant use (14.8% vs. 10.6%, p < 0.01) at 2 years post-surgery. Use of sedatives peaked for patients at the time of surgery (14.4% vs. 6.1%, p < 0.01) and remained elevated at two years after surgery with 9.9% versus 6.6% (p < 0.01). For all the studied drugs, previous drug use was the strongest predictor for use 2 years after surgery.

    Conclusion: This nationwide study shows that increased use of AED, antidepressants and sedatives in patients with meningioma started perioperatively, and remained elevated two years following surgery.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Plasma miRNA can detect colorectal cancer, but how early?2018Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 7, nr 5, s. 1697-1705Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of deaths worldwide but has a good prognosis if detected early. The need for efficient, preferable non‐ or minimally invasive, inexpensive screening tools is therefore critical. We analyzed 12 miRNAs in pre‐ and postdiagnostic plasma samples to evaluate their potential as CRC screening markers. We used a unique study design with two overlapping cohorts, allowing analysis of pre‐ and postdiagnostic samples from 58 patients with CRC and matched healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of miR‐15b, ‐16, ‐18a, ‐19a, 21, ‐22, ‐25, ‐26a, ‐29c, ‐142‐5p, ‐150, and ‐192 were measured by semi‐quantitative real‐time PCR. Concentrations of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 in plasma from patients with CRC were significantly altered compared to healthy controls. Combined as a multimarker panel, they detected CRC with an AUC of 0.93. Furthermore, levels of these three miRNAs also showed different levels in the prediagnostic case samples close to diagnosis. Only miR‐21‐levels were elevated several years before diagnosis. Plasma levels of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 show promise as screening biomarkers for CRC. However, based on our unique analysis of prediagnostic and postdiagnostic samples from the same patients, we conclude that circulating miRNAs elevated at diagnosis may not automatically be suitable for CRC screening, if the increase occurs too close to clinical diagnosis.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Späth, Florentin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Björkblom, Benny
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Dahlin, Anna M.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Pre-diagnostic levels of sVEGFR2, sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R are associated with glioma risk: A nested case–control study of repeated samples2022Inngår i: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 1016-1025Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    No strong aetiological factors have been established for glioma aside from genetic mutations and variants, ionising radiation and an inverse relationship with asthmas and allergies. Our aim was to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic immune protein levels and glioma risk. We conducted a case–control study nested in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study cohort. We analysed 133 glioma cases and 133 control subjects matched by age, sex and date of blood donation. ELISA or Luminex bead-based multiplex assays were used to measure plasma levels of 19 proteins. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% CIs. To further model the protein trajectories over time, the linear mixed-effects models were conducted. We found that the levels of sVEGFR2, sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R were associated with glioma risk. After adjusting for the time between blood sample collection and glioma diagnosis, the odds ratios were 1.72 (95% CI = 1.01–2.93), 1.48 (95% CI = 1.01–2.16) and 1.90 (95% CI = 1.14–3.17) for sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R, respectively. The trajectory of sVEGFR2 concentrations over time was different between cases and controls (p-value = 0.031), increasing for cases (0.8% per year) and constant for controls. Our findings suggest these proteins play important roles in gliomagenesis.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 21 of 21
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf