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  • 1. Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    The psychometric properties of the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children in a sample of Swedish children2012In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 3, article id 18505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children (TSCYC).

    Method: The study was composed of a total of 629 children—296 girls and 333 boys—aged 3–11, from a non-clinical population who were rated by their caretakers (26 of whom performed a re-test after 2 weeks) in addition to 59 children from a clinical population with known experience of sexual and/or physical abuse. The caretakers from the normal population completed the TSCYC and Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events Scale-parent scale (LITE-P) and the clinical-sample caretakers completed TSCYC. The psychometric properties of the TSCYC were examined, including reliability and validity.

    Results: The reliability (Cronbach's alpha) of the TSCYC, total scale, was α=0.93 (normative group) and α=0.96 (clinical group). For the clinical scales, this ranged between α=0.55–0.88 and 0.77–0.93, respectively. Test-retest for the total scale was r=0.77. Regarding criterion-related validity, the clinical groups scored significantly higher than the normative group, and within the normative group significant relationships were found between exposure to traumatic events and TSCYC scores. Confirmatory factor analysis testing of the construction of the TSCYC indicated significant loadings on the original scales.

    Conclusion: The Swedish version of TSCYC appears to be a screening instrument with satisfactory psychometric qualities for identifying symptoms after trauma in young children. The instrument can also be recommended to clinicians for screening purposes in a European context.

  • 2. Olff, Miranda
    et al.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Intimate partner violence and mental health-remarks from two Chief Editors on a joint publishing venture2014In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 5, article id 25679Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Sinai, Cave
    et al.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Nordström, Anna-Lena
    Nordström, Peter
    Nilsonne, Asa
    Wilczek, Alexander
    Asberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci Psychiat, SE-17176 Solna, Sweden.
    Hypothalamic pituitary thyroid axis and exposure to interpersonal violence in childhood among women with borderline personality disorder2014In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 5, p. 23911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A relationship between exposure to sexual violence and thyroid hormone alterations has been observed among women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) report a high estimate of childhood trauma.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess relationships between thyroid hormone measures and exposure to violence in childhood in women with BPD.

    METHOD: A total of 92 clinically euthyroid women with BPD (53% with comorbid PTSD) diagnosis and at least two prior suicide attempts were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scales (KIVS). The KIVS contains four subscales with concrete examples of exposure to violence and expressed violent behavior in childhood (aged 6-14 years) and during adult life (15 years or older). Baseline thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma free and bound triiodothyronine (FT3 and T3), thyroxine (FT4 and T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with immunoassays. The FT3/FT4 ratio was used to estimate peripheral deiodination. Plasma cortisol was also assessed.

    RESULTS: Sixty-seven percent of patients reported medium high or high level of exposure to interpersonal violence as a child. The FT3/FT4 ratio showed a significant negative correlation with exposure to violence as a child. Patients with PTSD had significantly higher plasma cortisol levels. An ad hoc analysis revealed that the correlation between KIVS exposure to interpersonal violence as a child and FT3/FT4 ratio was significant only in patients with comorbid PTSD. Altered thyroid activity, especially FT3/FT4, levels was associated with exposure to violence in childhood in women with BPD.

    CONCLUSION: Severe childhood trauma-related stress may promote lasting altered thyroid levels and/or contribute to the development of psychopathology associated with BPD traits or PTSD.

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