umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bang, Casper N.
    et al.
    Greve, Anders M.
    Rossebø, Anne B.
    Ray, Simon
    Egstrup, Kenneth
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nienaber, Christoph
    Okin, Peter M.
    Devereux, Richard B.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Antihypertensive treatment with β-blockade in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and association with cardiovascular events2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e006709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a beta-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS.

    Methods and results: We did a post hoc analysis of 1873 asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in the SEAS (Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) study. Propensity-matched Cox regression and competing risk analyses were used to assess risk ratios for all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, and cardiovascular death. A total of 932 (50%) patients received Bbl at baseline. During a median follow-up of 4.3 +/- 0.9 years, 545 underwent aortic valve replacement, and 205 died; of those, 101 were cardiovascular deaths, including 40 sudden cardiovascular deaths. In adjusted analyses, Bbl use was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3-0.7, P<0.001), cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.7, P<0.001), and sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio 0.2, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.6, P=0.004). This was confirmed in competing risk analyses (all P<0.004). No interaction was detected with AS severity (all P>0.1).

    Conclusions: In post hoc analyses Bbl therapy did not increase the risk of all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, or cardiovascular death in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. A prospective study may be warranted to determine if Bbl therapy is in fact beneficial.

  • 2. Bonamy, Anna-Karin Edstedt
    et al.
    Mohlkert, Lilly-Ann
    Hallberg, Jenny
    Liuba, Petru
    Fellman, Vineta
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Norman, Mikael
    Blood Pressure in 6-Year-Old Children Born Extremely Preterm2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 8, article id e005858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Advances in perinatal medicine have increased infant survival after very preterm birth. Although this progress is welcome, there is increasing concern that preterm birth is an emerging risk factor for hypertension at young age, with implications for the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results-We measured casual blood pressures (BPs) in a population-based cohort of 6-year-old survivors of extremely preterm birth (< 27 gestational weeks; n=171) and in age-and sex-matched controls born at term (n=172). Measured BP did not differ, but sex, age-, and height-adjusted median z scores were 0.14 SD higher (P=0.02) for systolic BP and 0.10 SD higher (P=0.01) for diastolic BP in children born extremely preterm than in controls. Among children born extremely preterm, shorter gestation, higher body mass index, and higher heart rate at follow-up were all independently associated with higher BP at 6 years of age, whereas preeclampsia, smoking in pregnancy, neonatal morbidity, and perinatal corticosteroid therapy were not. In multivariate regression analyses, systolic BP decreased by 0.10 SD (P=0.08) and diastolic BP by 0.09 SD (P=0.02) for each week-longer gestation. Conclusions-Six-year-old children born extremely preterm have normal but slightly higher BP than their peers born at term. Although this finding is reassuring for children born preterm and their families, follow-up at older age is warranted.

  • 3.
    Graipe, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Binsell-Gerdin, Emil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Internal Medicine, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden .
    Söderström, Lars
    Mooe, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Incidence, Time Trends, and Predictors of Intracranial Hemorrhage During Long-Term Follow-up After Acute Myocardial Infarction2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 12, article id e002290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To address the lack of knowledge regarding the long-term risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the incidence, time trends, and predictors of ICH in a large population within 1 year of discharge after AMI; (2) investigate the comparative 1-year risk of ICH in AMI patients and a reference group; and (3) study the impact of previous ischemic stroke on ICH risk in patients treated with various antithrombotic therapies.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Data about patients whose first AMI occurred between 1998 and 2010 were collected from the Swedish Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart-Intensive-Care Admissions (RIKS-HIA). Patients with an ICH after discharge were identified in the National Patient Register. Risk was compared against a matched reference population. Of 187 386 patients, 590 had an ICH within 1 year. The 1-year cumulative incidence (0.35%) was approximately twice that of the reference group, and it did not change significantly over time. Advanced age, previous ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and reduced glomerular filtration rate were associated with increased ICH risk, whereas female sex was associated with a decreased risk. Previous ischemic stroke did not increase risk of ICH associated with single or dual antiplatelet therapy, but increased risk with anticoagulant therapy.

    CONCLUSION: The 1-year incidence of ICH after AMI remained stable, at ≈0.35%, over the study period. Advanced age, decreased renal function, and previous ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke are predictive of increased ICH risk.

  • 4. Grøntved, Anders
    et al.
    Koivula, Robert W
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Østergaard, Lars
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bicycling to Work and Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Risk: A Cohort Study Among Swedish Men and Women2016In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e004413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bicycling to work may be a viable approach for achieving physical activity that provides cardiovascular health benefits. In this study we investigated the relationship of bicycling to work with incidence of obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance across a decade of follow-up in middle-aged men and women.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 23 732 Swedish men and women with a mean age of 43.5 years at baseline who attended a health examination twice during a 10-year period (1990-2011). In multivariable adjusted models we calculated the odds of incident obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, comparing individuals who commuted to work by bicycle with those who used passive modes of transportation. We also examined the relationship of change in commuting mode with incidence of these clinical risk factors. Cycling to work at baseline was associated with lower odds of incident obesity (odds ratio [OR]=0.85, 95% CI 0.73-0.99), hypertension (OR=0.87, 95% CI 0.79-0.95), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.76-0.94), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.96) compared with passive travel after adjusting for putative confounding factors. Participants who maintained or began bicycling to work during follow-up had lower odds of obesity (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.50-0.73), hypertension (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.98), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.90), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.82, 95% CI 0.74-0.91) compared with participants not cycling to work at both times points or who switched from cycling to other modes of transport during follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that commuting by bicycle to work is an important strategy for primordial prevention of clinical cardiovascular risk factors among middle-aged men and women.

  • 5. Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Hellberg, Dan
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    James, Stefan
    Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Death After First Stroke in Long-Distance Ski Race Participants2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 10, article id e002469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity is of benefit for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, but it appears to increase the risk for atrial fibrillation. We aimed to study a cohort of patients following a first stroke in individuals with previous high physical activity, compare them to the general population with respect to recurrent stroke and death, and relate these to atrial fibrillation. Methods and Results: From the participants of the Vasaloppet, the world's largest ski-race, and matched individuals from the general population (n=708 604), we identified 5964 patients hospitalized with a first-time stroke between 1994 and 2010. Individuals with severe diseases were excluded. One half percent of skiers and 1% of nonskiers were hospitalized due to stroke. The incidence rate was 8.3 per 100 person-years among skiers and 11.1 among nonskiers. The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrent stroke or death between the 2 groups was 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.86). The result was consistent in subgroups. The HR for death was 0.66 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.78) and for recurrent stroke 0.82 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). After adjustment for smoking and socioeconomic factors, the HR for death was consistent at 0.70 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87) while the HR for recurrent stroke was not statistically significant. Outcomes for skiers with atrial fibrillation tended to show a lower risk than for nonskiers. Conclusions: This large cohort study supports the hypothesis that patients with a stroke and with prior regular physical activity have a lower risk of death, while their risk for recurrent stroke is similar to that of nonskiers. The skiers had a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation, but still no increased risk of recurring stroke.

  • 6. Langrish, Jeremy P
    et al.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Barath, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blackwell, Scott
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Megson, Ian L
    Treweeke, Andrew
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    Altered nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to diesel exhaust inhalation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction in man2013In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 2, no 1, p. e004309-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Diesel exhaust inhalation causes cardiovascular dysfunction including impaired vascular reactivity, increased blood pressure, and arterial stiffness. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in mediating these effects.

    Methods and Results In 2 randomized double-blind crossover studies, healthy nonsmokers were exposed to diesel exhaust or filtered air. Study 1: Bilateral forearm blood flow was measured during intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 5 to 20 mu g/min) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 to 8 mu g/min) in the presence of the NO clamp (NO synthase inhibitor N-G-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) 8 mu g/min coinfused with the NO donor SNP at 90 to 540 ng/min to restore basal blood flow). Study 2: Blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and cardiac output were measured during systemic NO synthase inhibition with intravenous L-NMMA (3 mg/kg). Following diesel exhaust inhalation, plasma nitrite concentrations were increased (68 +/- 48 versus 41 +/- 32 nmol/L; P=0.006) despite similar L-NMMA-induced reductions in basal blood flow (-20.6 +/- 14.7% versus -21.1 +/- 14.6%; P=0.559) compared to air. In the presence of the NO clamp, ACh and SNP caused dose-dependent vasodilatation that was not affected by diesel exhaust inhalation (P>0.05 for both). Following exposure to diesel exhaust, L-NMMA caused a greater increase in blood pressure (P=0.048) and central arterial stiffness (P=0.007), but reductions in cardiac output and increases in systemic vascular resistance (P>0.05 for both) were similar to those seen with filtered air.

    Conclusions Diesel exhaust inhalation disturbs normal vascular homeostasis with enhanced NO generation unable to compensate for excess consumption. We suggest the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution are, in part, mediated through reduced NO bioavailability.

  • 7.
    Ljungberg, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Lipoprotein(a) and the Apolipoprotein B/A1 Ratio Independently Associate With Surgery for Aortic Stenosis Only in Patients With Concomitant Coronary Artery Disease2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e007160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aortic stenosis (AS) has different clinical phenotypes, including AS with or without concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). It is unknown whether these phenotypes share the same risk factors. In particular, lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and apolipoproteins (Apo) are associated with AS, but it is unknown whether these associations differ among phenotypes. In this prospective analysis we examined the impact of Lp(a) and Apo in subgroups of patients with AS.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 336 patients (mean age at survey 56.7 years, 48% female) who underwent surgery for AS after a median 10.9 years (interquartile range 9.3 years), participants in 1 of 3 large population surveys. For each patient, 2 matched referents were allocated. Lp(a) and Apo were analyzed in the baseline samples. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risks related to a 1 (ln) standard deviation increase in Lp(a) and the ratio of Apo B to Apo A1 (Apo B/A1 ratio). High levels of Lp(a) predicted surgery for AS in 203 patients with concomitant CAD (odds ratio [95% confidence intervals]) (1.29 [1.07-1.55]), but not in 132 patients without CAD (1.04 [0.83-1.29]) in the fully adjusted model. Similarly, a high Apo B/A1 ratio predicted surgery in patients with concomitant CAD (1.43 [1.16-1.76]) but not in those without CAD (0.87 [0.69-1.10]).

    CONCLUSIONS: High levels of Lp(a) and a high Apo B/A1 ratio were associated with surgery for AS in patients with concomitant CAD but not in those with isolated AS. This finding may lead to a new avenue of research for targeted risk factor interventions in this population.

  • 8.
    Ljungberg, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Albertsson, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Holmer, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Relation to Future Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease or Ascending Aortic Disease: A Case-Referent Study2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 5, article id e005133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Risk factors for developing heart valve and ascending aortic disease are based mainly on retrospective data. To elucidate these factors in a prospective manner, we have performed a nested case-referent study using data from large, population-based surveys. Methods and Results: A total of 777 patients operated for heart valve disease or disease of the ascending aorta had previously participated in population-based health surveys in Northern Sweden. Median time (interquartile range) from survey to surgery was 10.5 (9.0) years. Primary indications for surgery were aortic stenosis (41%), aortic regurgitation (12%), mitral regurgitation (23%), and dilatation/dissection of the ascending aorta (17%). For each case, referents were allocated, matched for age, sex, and geographical area. In multivariable models, surgery for aortic stenosis was predicted by hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus, and active smoking. Surgery for aortic regurgitation was associated with a low cholesterol level, whereas a high cholesterol level predicted surgery for mitral regurgitation. Hypertension, blood pressure, and previous smoking predicted surgery for disease of the ascending aorta whereas diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced risk. After exclusion of cases with coronary atherosclerosis, only the inverse associations between cholesterol and aortic regurgitation and between diabetes mellitus and disease of the ascending aorta remained. Conclusions: This is the first truly prospective study of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their association with valvular heart disease and disease of the ascending aorta. We confirm the strong association between traditional risk factors and aortic stenosis, but only in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease. In isolated valvular heart disease, the impact of traditional risk factors is varying.

  • 9. Mohlkert, Lilly-Ann
    et al.
    Hallberg, Jenny
    Broberg, Olof
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Pegelow Halvorsen, Cecilia
    Liuba, Petru
    Fellman, Vineta
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Norman, Mikael
    The Preterm Heart in Childhood: Left Ventricular Structure, Geometry, and Function Assessed by Echocardiography in 6-Year-Old Survivors of Periviable Births2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 2, article id e007742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preterm birth has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity in adult life. We evaluated whether preterm birth is associated with deviating cardiac structure and function before school start. Methods and Results: In total, 176 children aged 6 years and born extremely preterm (EXPT; gestational age of 22-26weeks) and 134 children born at term (control [CTRL]) were studied. We used echocardiography to assess left heart dimensions, geometry, and functions. Recording and off-line analyses of echocardiographic images were performed by operators blinded to group belonging. Body size, blood pressure, and heart rate were also measured. Rates of family history of cardiovascular disease and sex distribution were similar in the EXPT and CTRL groups. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not differ, whereas diastolic blood pressure was slightly higher in EXPT than CTRL participants. After adjusting for body surface area, left ventricular length, width, and aortic valve annulus diameter were 3% to 5% smaller in EXPT than CTRL participants. Left ventricular longitudinal shortening and systolic tissue velocity were 7% to 11% lower, and transversal shortening fraction was 6% higher in EXPT than CTRL participants. The EXPT group also exhibited lower atrial emptying velocities than the CTRL group. Sex, fetal growth restriction, or a patent ductus arteriosus in the neonatal period did not contribute to cardiac dimensions or performance. Conclusions: Six-year-old children born extremely preterm exhibit a unique cardiac phenotype characterized by smaller left ventricles with altered systolic and diastolic functions than same-aged children born at term.

  • 10.
    Otten, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Ståhl, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stomby, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Saleh, Ahmed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hauksson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Department of Radiography and Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Svensson, Michael B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Sports Medicine.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Exercise Training Adds Cardiometabolic Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus2019In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e010634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The accumulation of myocardial triglycerides and remodeling of the left ventricle are common features in type 2 diabetes mellitus and represent potential risk factors for the development of diastolic and systolic dysfunction. A few studies have investigated the separate effects of diet and exercise training on cardiac function, but none have investigated myocardial changes in response to a combined diet and exercise intervention. This 12-week randomized study assessed the effects of a Paleolithic diet, with and without additional supervised exercise training, on cardiac fat, structure, and function.

    Methods and Results: Twenty-two overweight and obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomized to either a Paleolithic diet and standard-care exercise recommendations ( PD ) or to a Paleolithic diet plus supervised exercise training 3 hours per week ( PD - EX ). This study includes secondary end points related to cardiac structure and function, ie, myocardial triglycerides levels, cardiac morphology, and strain were measured using cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including proton spectroscopy, at baseline and after 12 weeks. Both groups showed major favorable metabolic changes. The PD - EX group showed significant decreases in myocardial triglycerides levels (-45%, P=0.038) and left ventricle mass to end-diastolic volume ratio (-13%, P=0.008) while the left ventricle end-diastolic volume and stroke volume increased significantly (+14%, P=0.004 and +17%, P=0.008, respectively). These variables were unchanged in the PD group.

    Conclusions: Exercise training plus a Paleolithic diet reduced myocardial triglycerides levels and improved left ventricle remodeling in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Clinical Trial Registration URL : http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT 01513798.

  • 11. Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    McLeod, Olga
    Gertow, Karl
    Silveira, Angela
    Baldassarre, Damiano
    Van Zuydam, Natalie
    Shah, Sonia
    Fava, Cristiano
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Veglia, Fabrizio
    Sennblad, Bengt
    Larsson, Malin
    Sabater-Lleal, Maria
    Leander, Karin
    Gigante, Bruna
    Tabak, Adam
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Kauhanen, Jussi
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Smit, Andries J.
    Mannarino, Elmo
    Giral, Philippe
    Humphries, Steve E.
    Tremoli, Elena
    de Faire, Ulf
    Lind, Lars
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Hedblad, Bo
    Melander, Olle
    Kumari, Meena
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Lundman, Pia
    Ohrvik, John
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Sex-Specific Effects of Adiponectin on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Incident Cardiovascular Disease2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e001853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Plasma adiponectin levels have previously been inversely associated with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we used a sex-stratified Mendelian randomization approach to investigate whether adiponectin has a causal protective influence on IMT. Methods and Results-Baseline plasma adiponectin concentrationwas tested for association with baseline IMT, IMT progression over 30 months, and occurrence of cardiovascular events within 3 years in 3430 participants (women, n=1777; men, n=1653) with high cardiovascular risk but no prevalent disease. Plasma adiponectin levels were inversely associated with baseline mean bifurcation IMT after adjustment for established risk factors (beta=-0.018, P<0.001) in men but not in women (beta=-0.006, P=0.185; P for interaction=0.061). Adiponectin levels were inversely associated with progression of mean common carotid IMT in men (beta=-0.0022, P=0.047), whereas no association was seen in women (0.0007, P=0.475; P for interaction=0.018). Moreover, we observed that adiponectin levels were inversely associated with coronary events in women (hazard ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.87) but not in men (hazard ratio 0.82,95% CI0.54 to 1.25). Agenescore of adiponectin-raisingalleles in6loci, reported recently inalarge multi-ethnic metaanalysis, was inversely associated with baseline mean bifurcation IMT in men (beta=-0.0008, P=0.004) but not in women (beta=-0.0003, P=0.522; P for interaction=0.007). Conclusions-This report provides some evidence for adiponectin protecting against atherosclerosis, with effects being confined to men; however, compared with established cardiovascular risk factors, the effect of plasma adiponectin was modest. Further investigation involving mechanistic studies is warranted.

  • 12. Rietz, Helene
    et al.
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Sahlin, Carin
    Marklund, Marie E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nocturnal Blood Pressure Is Reduced by a Mandibular Advancement Device for Sleep Apnea in Women: Findings From Secondary Analyses of a Randomized Trial2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 13, article id e008642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high blood pressure. The magnitude of blood pressure effects from sleep apnea treatment is unclear. We aimed to determine the effect of mandibular advancement device therapy on ambulatory nighttime and daytime blood pressure in women and men with daytime sleepiness and snoring or mild to moderate sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index, <30).

    METHODS AND RESULTS: In this 4-month, double-blind, randomized controlled trial comprising 96 untreated patients, 27 women and 58 men, aged 31 to 70 years, completed the study. The active group received individually made adjustable mandibular advancement devices, and the control group was given individually made sham devices, to be used during sleep. Polysomnographic sleep recordings and ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure measurements were performed at baseline and at follow-up. In women with mandibular advancement devices, the mean nighttime systolic blood pressure was 10.8 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 4.0-17.7 mm Hg; P=0.004) lower than in the women in the sham group, adjusted for baseline blood pressure, age, body mass index, and the apnea-hypopnea index. The mean nighttime adjusted diastolic blood pressure was 6.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 2.7-10.4 mm Hg; P=0.002) lower in the mandibular advancement device group. In men, there were no significant differences in blood pressure at night or during the daytime between the intervention groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: A mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea reduces nocturnal blood pressure in women.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00477009.

  • 13. Öhman, Annika
    et al.
    El-Segaier, Milad
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Malm, Torsten
    Nilsson, Boris
    Pivodic, Aldina
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Sonesson, Sven-Erik
    Mellander, Mats
    Changing Epidemiology of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: Results of a National Swedish Cohort Study2019In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e010893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Norwood surgery provides a palliative surgical option for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and has been available in Sweden since 1993. The practice of prenatal ultrasound screening was gradually implemented in the same era, resulting in an increased prenatal detection rate. Our primary aims were to study changes in the incidence of live births, prenatal detection rate, and the termination of pregnancies over time. The secondary aims were to study the proportion of live-borns undergoing surgery and to identify factors that influenced whether surgery was or was not performed. Methods and Results Neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome with aortic atresia born 1990-2010 were identified through national databases, surgical files, and medical records. The fetal incidence was estimated from the period when prenatal screening was rudimentary. The study period was divided into the presurgical, early surgical, and late surgical periods. The incidence was calculated as the overall yearly incidence for each time period and sex separately. Factors influencing whether surgery was performed were analyzed using Cox-logistic regression. The incidence at live birth decreased from 15.4 to 8.4 per 100 000. The prenatal detection rate increased from 27% to 63%, and terminations increased from 19% to 56%. The odds of having surgery was higher in the late period and higher in the group with prenatal diagnosis. Conclusions We observed a decrease in incidence of live-borns with hypoplastic left heart syndrome aortic atresia. There was in increase in prenatal detection rate and an increase in termination of pregnancy. The proportion of live-borns who underwent surgery increased between time periods.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf