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  • 1.
    Bouzarovski, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham.
    Salukvadze, Joseph
    Department of Human Geography, Tbilisi State University, Faculty of Social and Political Studies.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A socially resilient urban transition?: The contested landscapes of apartment building extensions in two post-communist cities2011In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 48, no 13, p. 2689-2714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though social processes across the globe are increasingly being theorised through a resilience lens, this has rarely been the case within the domain of everyday life in the city. The resilience debate also remains highly geographically selective, as regions that have undergone far-reaching systemic change over the past 20 years-including the post-communist states of the former Soviet Union and eastern and central Europe (ECE)-generally remain omitted from it. In order to address such knowledge gaps, an investigation is made of the relationships between social resilience and micro-level socio-spatial change in the built environment of the post-communist city, by focusing on the institutional, spatial and economic underpinnings of apartment building extensions (ABEs) on multistorey residential buildings in the Macedonian capital of Skopje and the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Both cities contain a wide variety of ABEs, whose reinforced concrete frame constructions often rival the host buildings in terms of size and function. By exploring the architectural and social landscapes created by the extensions, it is hoped to highlight their embeddedness in a set of policy decisions and coping strategies, as well as their controversial implications on the present and future use of urban space.

  • 2.
    Hanes, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Wikström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Wångmar, Erik
    Municipal Preferences for State-imposed Amalgamations: An Empirical Study Based on the Swedish Municipal Reform of 19522012In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 2733-2750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns municipal preferences for state-imposed municipal amalgamations, focusing on factors that may explain municipal acceptance of, or objection to, a state-imposed amalgamation decision. The empirical analysis is based on the extensive municipal reform that occurred in Sweden in 1952, which reduced the number of municipalities from 2498 to 1037. In 66 per cent of the amalgamated cases, at least one municipality complained. The results show that income differences affected the willingness to amalgamate; high-income municipalities opposed amalgamation with less wealthy municipalities. The results also indicate that the size (absolute and relative) of the municipalities affected their willingness to amalgamate. Small and large municipalities were most likely to accept the amalgamation decision and equally sized municipalities were less likely to amalgamate voluntarily.

  • 3.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Tammaru, Tiit
    University of Tartu.
    ´Neighbourhood effects´ and ´City effects´: the entry of newly arrived immigrants into the labour market2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1165-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important debate in current research and policy focuses on the role of urban residential segregation on the social mobility of immigrants. Much focus has been on ‘neighbourhood effects’ and on how spatial variations within the city affect individual careers. This paper adds the analysis of variations of labour market incorporation between cities. The labour market careers of one migrant cohort to Sweden are analysed, where the analysis of ‘neighbourhood effects’ and ‘city effects’ are studied jointly, using a longitudinal database and discrete-time event history analysis. The results show that labour market participation increases slowly over time and there are large variations due to migrant origin, gender and education. Both ‘neighbourhood effects’ and ‘city effects’ were significant, but whereas the former decreased over time, the ‘city effect’ was robust. Accordingly, contextual aspects of the individual city need to be included in the analysis of neighbourhood effects.

  • 4.
    Lidström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Citizens' inter-municipal political orientations: evidence from Swedish city-regions2010In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 2093-2109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories of public participation, such as the civic voluntarism model, typically assume that local participation takes place in the community where one resides. However, with an increasingly mobile population, this can no longer be taken for granted. Using survey data, this study analyses citizens’ intermunicipal political orientations in urban and suburban municipalities in seven Swedish city-regions. The civic voluntarism model turns out to be only partially applicable. In addition, it appears that having links across the urban—suburb divide—that is, working in a large urban region but dwelling in the suburbs rather than in the city—enhances one’s intermunicipal political orientation. The findings have practical implications that point to the need to reconsider how urban democracy is organised.

  • 5.
    Sandberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    ‘I don’t think we’ll ever be finished with this’: Fear and safety in policy and practice2015In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 52, no 14, p. 2664-2679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning contexts, safety is often discussed from a women’s perspective. An ideal site forexploring some of the key issues is Umea°, a medium-sized town in northern Sweden. Here, attentionto women’s fear of violence greatly increased at the turn of the century, when a single repeatoffender known as the ‘Haga Man’ assaulted several women in the city. People’s (especiallywomen’s) fear of violence came to be seriously recognised, discussed and taken into considerationin the city’s planning. The present research is based on an analysis of empirical data collectedin 2008, through interviews with people who in various ways work to increase safety inUmea°. The paper addresses how the informants define the problem of fear of violence in publicspace and the strategies they employ to address it, what could be described as the analyticalpracticeparadox, as the results show the difficulties of integrating gender-aware planning intoplanning practice.

  • 6.
    Sandow, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Til work do us part: the social fallacy of long-distance commuting2014In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 55p. 526-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the social implications of long-distance commuting on commuters and their spouses in Sweden. In a nation-wide study, the extent to which long-distance commuting increases the odds that couples will separate is investigated through event history analysis. Discrete-time logistic regression models were employed with longitudinal data on Swedish couples in 2000 to explore the odds of separation following long-distance commuting during 1995 to 2005. As expected, the results show that separation rates are higher among long-distance commuting couples compared with non-commuting couples. More complex results show that for men the odds of separating are highest if the commuting is on a temporary basis, and that women’s odds decrease when they continue commuting for a longer time-period. The long-distance commuting effect on relationships also varies depending on residential context.

1 - 6 of 6
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