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  • 1.
    Ahl, Caroline
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nyström, Maria
    To handle the unexpected: the meaning of caring in pre-hospital emergency care2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 33-41Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient's voice has not been present to the same degree as the professional perspective in caring research in a pre-hospital context. In order to further develop and improve pre-hospital care, it is therefore important to explore patients' situations not only in life threatening but also in non-traumatic situations. This is especially important as these patients might be defined as inappropriate attendees of ambulance services. The aim of this study was to interpret and explain experiences of caring in pre-hospital care situations that are not defined as traumatic or life threatening. Twenty informants aged between 34 and 82 years were interviewed. The design of the study was exploratory, and it used an interpretative approach in order to understand the meaning of pre-hospital caring. The findings show that pre-hospital caring can be understood and explained as a matter of interplay between carer(s) and patient with potentials for positive as well as negative outcomes. Our conclusion is that the initial meeting is of vital importance in how patients experience pre-hospital care. It is suggested that general public information on the development of Swedish pre-hospital care received in turn may facilitate the first encounter between patient and carer(s). 

  • 2.
    Aléx, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundgren, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Henriksson, Otto
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Being cold when injured in a cold environment: patients' experiences2013In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients in prehospital care, irrespective of diseases or trauma might experience thermal discomfort because of a cold environment and are at risk for decreasing body temperature which can increase both morbidity and mortality.

    Objective: To explore patients' experiences of being cold when injured in a cold environment.

    Method: Twenty persons who had been injured in a cold environment in northern Sweden were interviewed. Active heat supply was given to 13 of them and seven had passive heat supply. The participants were asked to narrate their individual experience of cold and the pre- and post-injury event, until arrival at the emergency department. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, then analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Patients described that they suffered more from the cold than because of the pain from the injury. Patients who received active heat supply experienced it in a positive way. Two categories were formulated: Enduring suffering and Relief of suffering.

    Conclusion: Thermal discomfort became the largest problem independent of the severity of the injuries. We recommend the use of active heat supply to reduce the negative experiences of thermal discomfort when a person is injured in a cold environment.

  • 3.
    Backteman-Erlanson, Susann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jacobsson, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Caring for traffic accident victims: the stories of nine male police officers2011In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological strain due to the work environment is common, especially in those occupations which involve working in critical situations. Working as a police officer seems to increase the risk of psychological problems such as symptoms of stress and post traumatic stress disorders. The aim of this study was to describe male police officers’ experiences of traumatic situations when caring for victims of traffic accidents, and to reflect the results through the perspective of gender theories. Nine police officers were asked to narrate and reflect upon their experiences in taking care of people who had been severely injured in traffic accidents. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The findings are presented in three themes: “being secure with the support system”, “being confident about prior successful actions, and “being burdened with uncertainty”. The officers’ descriptions showed that most of them had strategies that they used when they were first responders, developed on the basis of their own knowledge and actions and the support systems in their organization which enabled them to act in traumatic situations. When support systems, knowledge, and actions were insufficient, they sometimes felt insecure and “burdened with uncertainty”. In this male-dominated context, there was a risk that the officers may not talk enough about traumatic situations, thus influencing their ability to cope successfully.

  • 4.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Niederbach, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Rödin, Ann-Charlotte
    Experiences of surviving a cardiac arrest after therapeutic hypothermia treatment: an interview study2018In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 36, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiac arrest (CA) is often associated with high mortality. In Sweden, it is reported that 13–52 per 100,000 people suffer out-of-hospital CA, and survival to one month is 2–14%.

    Objective: This study aimed to describe people’s experiences of surviving a CA after therapeutic hypothermia treatment.

    Method: A descriptive qualitative design was used. Data were collected through individual interviews with seven CA survivors. The collected data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in six subthemes and three emerging themes. The themes were “Dealing with issues of mortality”, “Living a changed life”, and “Being confident with health care and family members”.

    Conclusion: Surviving a CA after therapeutic hypothermia treatment means having to deal with issues of mortality, and these patients face a turning point in life. The near-death event can create regression or progression in ethos among these patients.

    Relevance to clinical practice: This study implies that persons who have survived a CA need support to cope. One way to provide support might be to initially establish an individualized health care plan, including bringing up existential issues and involving family members in such conversations.

  • 5.
    Bölenius, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Vestin, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gyllencreutz, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Validating a questionnaire - prehospital preparedness for pediatric trauma patients2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 34, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, prehospital emergency care has undergone extensive development. Today, prehospital emergency nurses (PENs) are well trained and provide advanced care to patients of all ages. Caring for pediatric trauma patients is considered to be particularly demanding. However, in Sweden and internationally, there is a lack of research regarding PENs' preparedness for caring for pediatric trauma patients.

    Objective: The development and testing of a questionnaire on self-reported preparedness among PENs caring for pediatric trauma patients in a prehospital emergency setting.

    Methods: Questionnaire development included face and content validity tests resulting in 38 questions. Eighteen of these questions were analyzed by test-retest. The content of the questionnaire was statistically analyzed.

    Results: Fifteen questions were considered valid after reliability and validity tests. Three questions did not fulfill the stability criteria. The content analyses show a low degree of experience with pediatric trauma patients and half of the participants reported stress symptoms when responding to such alarms.

    Conclusion: The questionnaire assessing PENs preparedness caring for pediatric trauma patients in Sweden is considered to be suitable for research and clinical practice to improve the care of pediatric trauma patients and the health of PENs, although further testing of the questionnaire is required.

  • 6.
    Doohan, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Need for compassion in prehospital and emergency care: a qualitative study on bus crash survivors' experiences2015In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the survivors' experiences after a major bus crash. Background: Survivors' experiences of emergency care after transportation related major incidents are relatively unexplored, with research involving survivors mainly focused on pathological aspects or effects of crisis support. Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 54 out of 56 surviving passengers 5 years after a bus crash in Sweden. Interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Prehospital discomfort, lack of compassionate care, dissatisfaction with crisis support and satisfactory initial care and support are the categories. Lack of compassion in emergency departments was identified as a main finding. Lack of compassion caused distress among survivors and various needs for support were not met. Survivors' desire to be with their fellow survivors the day of the crash was not facilitated after arriving at emergency departments. Conclusions: Connectedness among survivors ought to be promoted upon arrival at emergency departments. There is a need for emergency department professionals to be sufficiently educated in compassionate care.

  • 7. Englund, Liselotte
    et al.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Survivors' experiences of media coverage after traumatic injury events2014In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Survivors' experiences of media at traumatic events, is still a limited research area. The aim of this study is to explore survivors' experiences of interacting with journalists and media coverage, including their experiences of being portrayed in the media, following two Swedish train crashes. Qualitative interviews were conducted with passengers from two train crashes in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis generated meaning units, subcategories, and categories. Survivors experienced interacting with journalists mainly in three ways: harmful, inconsequential, and helpful. Media content and personal media exposure was experienced in a similar way: uncomfortable, insignificant, and useful. Journalists and media coverage have a large impact on survivors' experiences following a traumatic event. It is important that emergency responders, such as ambulance nurses, are aware of how victims are affected by journalists' presence and the media coverage that follows so that negative outcomes can be reduced and the positive can be enhanced. The present study also shows that media coverage in the long term can become important pieces of information for the victim in order to understand and process the traumatic event. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Jacobsson, Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Backteman-Erlanson, Susann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences of critical incidents among female and male firefighters2015In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 100-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A critical incident is defined as an event stressful enough to overwhelm the usually effective coping skills of an individual. Firefighters are frequently exposed to critical incidents that might have consequences for individuals and their performance in organization. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe experiences of critical incidents among female and male Swedish firefighters. Method: In all 180 participants (16 women, 164 men) who had been involved in up to 25 critical incidents during the last year responded to a survey describing critical incidents experienced in the past year. A qualitative content analysis identified several areas for improvement in firefighters' working conditions. Results: Female firefighters were terse in describing their experiences, while the men described their experiences of critical events more vividly. The critical incidents described by the firefighters concerned such overwhelming situations as traffic accidents, huge fires, and other fatal incidents such as drownings and suicides. Risk of delay due to lack of equipment training and lack of medical education was mentioned. Lack of resources and organizational problems was mentioned as causing risks of failure. Several firefighters expressed frustration over being assaulted and threatened, or exposed to other kinds of violence. Not knowing how close, physically or mentally, one can get to people during ongoing rescue can lead to unsuccessful operations. Conclusions: Gender patterns should always be taken into account, making it possible for all firefighters to express and reflect on existentially tough experiences. Education needs to focus more on medical and mental health issues. Firefighters were sometimes exposed to the difficult challenge of violence and assault during rescue operations. The complexity of this problem needs to be highlighted, not only in firefighter organizations, but also in society in general. 

  • 9. Nord-Ljungquist, Helena
    et al.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Bohm, Katarina
    Communication and protocol compliance and their relation to the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): a mixed-methods study of simulated telephone-assisted CPR2015In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 254-259Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the event of a cardiac arrest, emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) play a critical role by providing telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR) to laypersons. The aim of our investigation was to describe compliance with the T-CPR protocol, the performance of the laypersons in a simulated T-CPR situation, and the communication between laypersons and EMDs during these actions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study by analysing 20 recorded video and audio files. In a simulation, EMDs provided laypersons with instructions following T-CPR protocols. These were then analysed using a mixed method with convergent parallel design. Results: If the EMDs complied with the T-CPR protocol, the laypersons performed the correct procedures in 71% of the actions. The single most challenging instruction of the T-CPR protocol, for both EMDs and laypersons, was airway control. Mean values for compression depth and frequency did not reach established guideline goals for CPR. Conclusion: Proper application of T-CPR protocols by EMDs resulted in better performance by laypersons in CPR. The most problematic task for EMDs as well for laypersons was airway management. The study results did not establish that the quality of communication between EMDs and laypersons performing CPR in a cardiac arrest situation led to statistically different outcomes, as measured by the quality and effectiveness of the CPR delivered.

1 - 9 of 9
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