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  • 1.
    Burström, Lage
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Aminoff, Anna
    Björ, Bodil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Manttari, Sate
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Pettersson, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rintamaki, Hannu
    Rodin, Ingemar
    Shilov, Victor
    Talykomv, Ljudmila
    Vaktskjold, Arild
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Musculoskeletal symptoms and exposure to whole-body vibration among open-pit mine workers in the arctic2017In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, E-ISSN 1896-494X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 553-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at 4 open-pit mines in Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden as part of the MineHealth project. The aim has been to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms between drivers of mining vehicles and non-drivers. Material and Methods: The mine workers were asked whether they had suffered from any musculoskeletal symptoms during the previous 12 months in specified body regions, and to grade the severity of these symptoms during the past month. They were also asked about their daily driving of mining vehicles. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 1323 workers (757 vehicle drivers) and the reported prevalence and severity of symptoms were highest for the lower back, followed by pain in the neck, shoulder and upper back. Drivers in the Nordic mines reported fewer symptoms than non-drivers, while for Russian mine workers the results were the opposite of that. The daily driving of mining vehicles had no significant association with the risk of symptoms. Female drivers indicated a higher prevalence of symptoms as compared to male drivers. Conclusions: The study provided only weak support for the hypothesis that drivers of vehicles reported a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms than non-vehicle drivers. There were marked differences in the prevalence of symptoms among workers in various enterprises, even though the nature of the job tasks was similar.

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  • 2.
    Hrubá, Františka
    et al.
    Regional Authority of Public Health, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Černá, Milena
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Chen, Chunying
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Harari, Florencia
    Institute for Development of Production and Work Environment (IFA), Quito, Ecuador.
    Horvat, Milena
    Institut Jožef Stefan, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Koppová, Kvetoslava
    Slovak Medical University Bratislava, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Krsková, Andrea
    National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Laamech, Jawhar
    Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Morocco (Laboratory of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy), Tangier, Morocco.
    Li, Yu-Feng
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Löfmark, Lina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lyoussi, Badiaa
    University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fez, Morocco (Laboratory of Natural Substances, Pharmacology, Environment, Modelling, Health and Quality of Life), Morocco.
    Mazej, Darja
    Institut Jožef Stefan, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Osredkar, Joško
    University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pawlas, Krystyna
    Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
    Pawlas, Natalia
    Medical University of Silesia, Poland (Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze), Zabrze, Poland.
    Prokopowicz, Adam
    Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland.
    Rentschler, Gerda
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Snoj Tratnik, Janja
    Institut Jožef Stefan, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Spěváčková, Věra
    National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Špirić, Zdravko
    Green Infrastructure Ltd, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    A regional comparison of children's blood cadmium, lead, and mercury in rural, urban and industrial areas of six European countries, and China, Ecuador, and Morocco2023In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, E-ISSN 1896-494X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 349-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The authors aimed to evaluate whether blood cadmium (B-Cd), lead (B-Pb) and mercury (B-Hg) in children differ regionally in 9 countries, and to identify factors correlating with exposure.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: The authors performed a cross-sectional study of children aged 7-14 years, living in 2007-2008 in urban, rural, or potentially polluted ("hot spot") areas (ca. 50 children from each area, in total 1363 children) in 6 European and 3 non-European countries. The authors analyzed Cd, Pb, and total Hg in blood and collected information on potential determinants of exposure through questionnaires. Regional differences in exposure levels were assessed within each country.

    RESULTS: Children living near industrial "hot-spots" had B-Cd 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4-1.9) times higher in the Czech Republic and 2.1 (95% CI:1.6-2.8) times higher in Poland, as compared to urban children in the same countries (geometric means [GM]: 0.13 μg/l and 0.15 μg/l, respectively). Correspondingly, B-Pb in the "hot spot" areas was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.6-2.1) times higher than in urban areas in Slovakia and 2.3 (95% CI: 1.9-2.7) times higher in Poland (urban GM: 19.4 μg/l and 16.3 μg/l, respectively). In China and Morocco, rural children had significantly lower B-Pb than urban ones (urban GM: 64 μg/l and 71 μg/l, respectively), suggesting urban exposure from leaded petrol, water pipes and/or coal-burning. Hg "hot spot" areas in China had B-Hg 3.1 (95% CI: 2.7-3.5) times higher, and Ecuador 1.5 (95% CI: 1.2-1.9) times higher, as compared to urban areas (urban GM: 2.45 μg/l and 3.23 μg/l, respectively). Besides industrial exposure, traffic correlated with B-Cd; male sex, environmental tobacco smoke, and offal consumption with B-Pb; and fish consumption and amalgam fillings with B-Hg. However, these correlations could only marginally explain regional differences.

    CONCLUSIONS: These mainly European results indicate that some children experience about doubled exposures to toxic elements just because of where they live. These exposures are unsafe, identifiable, and preventable and therefore call for preventive actions.

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  • 3. Pawlas, Natalia
    et al.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Cerna, Milena
    Harari, Florencia
    Harari, Raul
    Horvat, Milena
    Hruba, Frantiska
    Koppova, Kvetoslava
    Krskova, Andrea
    Krsnik, Mladen
    Li, Yu-Feng
    Löfmark, Lina
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lundström, Nils-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lyoussi, Badiaa
    Markiewicz-Gorka, Iwona
    Mazej, Darja
    Osredkar, Josko
    Pawlas, Krystyna
    Rentschler, Gerda
    Spevackova, Vera
    Spiric, Zdravko
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Tratnik, Janja Snoj
    Vadla, Drazenka
    Zizi, Soumia
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Cadmium, mercury and lead in blood of urban women in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, China, Ecuador and Morocco2013In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, E-ISSN 1896-494X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 58-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to make an international comparison of blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd), lead (B-Pb) and mercury (B-Hg) of women in seven European, and three non-European cities, and to identify determinants. About 50 women (age: 46-62) from each city were recruited (totally 480) in 2006-2009. Interview and questionnaire data were obtained. Blood samples were analysed in one laboratory to avoid interlaboratory variation. Between the European cities, the B-Pb and B-Cd results vary little (range of geometric means: 13.5-27.0 mu g/l and 0.25-0.65 mu g/l, respectively); the variation of B-Hg was larger (0.40-1.38 mu g/l). Between the non-European cities the results for B-Pb, B-Cd and B-Hg were 19.2-68.0, 0.39-0.99 and 1.01-2.73 mu g/l, respectively. Smoking was a statistically significant determinant for B-Cd, while fish and shellfish intakes contributed to B-Hg and B-Pb, amalgam fillings also contributed to B-Hg. The present results confirm the previous results from children; the exposure to lead and cadmium varies only little between different European cities suggesting that other factors than the living area are more important. The study also confirms the previous findings of higher cadmium and lead levels in some non-European cities. The geographical variation for mercury is significant.

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