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  • 1.
    Bain, G. I.
    et al.
    Australia .
    Polites, N.
    Australia .
    Higgs, B. G.
    Australia .
    Heptinstall, R. J.
    Unaffiliated .
    McGrath, Aleksandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    The functional range of motion of the finger joints2015In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 406-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to measure the functional range of motion of the finger joints needed to perform activities of daily living. Using the Sollerman hand grip function test, 20 activities were assessed in ten volunteers. The active and passive range of motion was measured with a computerized electric goniometer. The position of each finger joint was evaluated in the pre-grasp and grasp positions. The functional range of motion was defined as the range required to perform 90% of the activities, utilizing the pre-grasp and grasp measurements. The functional range of motion was 19 degrees-71 degrees, 23 degrees-87 degrees, and 10 degrees-64 degrees at the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints, respectively. This represents 48%, 59%, and 60% of the active motion of these joints, respectively. There was a significant difference in the functional range of motion between the joints of the fingers, with the ulnar digits having greater active and functional range. The functional range of motion is important for directing indications for surgery and rehabilitation, and assessing outcome of treatment.

  • 2.
    Bourke, Gráinne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK.
    McGrath, Aleksandra M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK.
    Novikov, Lev N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Effects of early nerve repair on experimental brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 275-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury refers to injury observed at the time of delivery, which may lead to major functional impairment in the upper limb. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of early nerve repair following complete brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats was examined. Brachial plexus injury induced 90% loss of spinal motoneurons and 70% decrease in biceps muscle weight at 28 days after injury. Retrograde degeneration in spinal cord was associated with decreased density of dendritic branches and presynaptic boutons and increased density of astrocytes and macrophages/microglial cells. Early repair of the injured brachial plexus significantly delayed retrograde degeneration of spinal motoneurons and reduced the degree of macrophage/microglial reaction but had no effect on muscle atrophy. The results demonstrate that early nerve repair of neonatal brachial plexus injury could promote survival of injured motoneurons and attenuate neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

  • 3. Wade, Ryckie G.
    et al.
    Itte, Vinay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK.
    Rankine, James J.
    Ridgway, John P.
    Bourke, Grainne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    The diagnostic accuracy of 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of root avulsions is of critical importance in traumatic brachial plexus injuries because it alters the reconstruction and prognosis. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging is gaining popularity, but there is limited and conflicting data on its diagnostic accuracy for root avulsion. This cohort study describes consecutive patients requiring brachial plexus exploration following trauma between 2008 and 2016. The index test was magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla and the reference test was operative exploration of the supraclavicular plexus. Complete data from 29 males was available. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 79%. The diagnostic accuracy of a pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 68%. We conclude that pseudomeningocoles were not a reliable sign of root avulsion and magnetic resonance imaging has modest diagnostic accuracy for root avulsions in the context of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Level of evidence: III

  • 4.
    Wadsten, Mats Å.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Sjödén, Göran O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Buttazzoni, Gunnar G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Buttazzoni, C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Englund, Erling
    Sayed-Noor, Arkan S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    The influence of late displacement in distal radius fractures on function, grip strength, range of motion and quality of life2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late displacement of distal radius fractures, still in acceptable radiological position after 1–2 weeks, occurs in approximately one-third of cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of late displacement on the functional outcome and quality of life at 1 year in non-operatively treated distal radius fractures. One hundred and seventy five unilateral conservatively treated distal radius fractures with minimal displacement after 10–14 days were finally evaluated in the study. Follow-up included radiographs at 3 months and clinical examination 1 year after the fracture. Final radiographic parameters, grip strength, range of motion, QuickDASH, EQ-5D and pain visual analogue scale were evaluated with multivariate analysis. Late displacement occurred in 28% of the cases and was associated with loss of grip strength and range of motion. No significant differences were seen in the outcome questionnaires.

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