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  • 1. Bagnato, Paola
    et al.
    Castagnino, Alessia
    Cortese, Katia
    Bono, Maria
    Grasso, Silvia
    Bellese, Grazia
    Daniele, Tiziana
    Lundmark, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Defilippi, Paola
    Castagnola, Patrizio
    Tacchetti, Carlo
    Cooperative but distinct early co-signaling events originate from ERBB2 and ERBB1 receptors upon trastuzumab treatment in breast cancer cells2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 36, p. 60109-60122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ERBB2 receptor belongs to the ERBB tyrosine kinase receptor family. At variance to the other family members, ERBB2 is a constitutively active orphan receptor. Upon ligand binding and activation, ERBB receptors form homo-or hetero-dimers with the other family members, including ERBB2, promoting an intracellular signaling cascade. ERBB2 is the preferred dimerization partner and ERBB2 heterodimers signaling is stronger and longer acting compared to heterodimers between other ERBB members. The specific contribution of ERBB2 in heterodimer signaling is still undefined. Here we report the formation of circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) upon treatment of the ERBB2-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 and ZR751 with Trastuzumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody directed against ERBB2. We found that in SK-BR-3 cells Trastuzumab leads to surface redistribution of ERBB2 and ERBB1 in CDRs, and that the ERBB2-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ERBB1 expression are both required for CDR formation. In particular, in these cells CDR formation requires activation of both the protein regulator of actin polymerization N-WASP, mediated by ERK1/2, and of the actin depolymerizing protein cofilin, mediated by ERBB1. Furthermore, we suggest that this latter event may be inhibited by the negative cell motility regulator p140Cap, as we found that p140Cap overexpression led to cofilin deactivation and inhibition of CDR formation. In conclusion, here we show for the first time an ERBB2-specific signaling contribution to an ERBB2/ERBB1 heterodimer, in the activation of a complex biological process such as the formation of CDRs.

  • 2. Barfeld, Stefan J
    et al.
    Fazli, Ladan
    Persson, Margareta
    Marjavaara, Lisette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Urbanucci, Alfonso
    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M
    Rennie, Paul S
    Ceder, Yvonne
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Visakorpi, Tapio
    Mills, Ian G
    Myc-dependent purine biosynthesis affects nucleolar stress and therapy response in prostate cancer2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 12587-12602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The androgen receptor is a key transcription factor contributing to the development of all stages of prostate cancer (PCa). In addition, other transcription factors have been associated with poor prognosis in PCa, amongst which c-Myc (MYC) is a well-established oncogene in many other cancers. We have previously reported that the AR promotes glycolysis and anabolic metabolism; many of these metabolic pathways are also MYC-regulated in other cancers. In this study, we report that in PCa cells de novo purine biosynthesis and the subsequent conversion to XMP is tightly regulated by MYC and independent of AR activity. We characterized two enzymes, PAICS and IMPDH2, within the pathway as PCa biomarkers in tissue samples and report increased efficacy of established anti-androgens in combination with a clinically approved IMPDH inhibitor, mycophenolic acid (MPA). Treatment with MPA led to a significant reduction in cellular guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels accompanied by nucleolar stress and p53 stabilization. In conclusion, targeting purine biosynthesis provides an opportunity to perturb PCa metabolism and enhance tumour suppressive stress responses.

  • 3. Bersani, Cinzia
    et al.
    Sivars, Lars
    Haeggblom, Linnea
    DiLorenzo, Sebastian
    Mints, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahrlund-Richter, Andreas
    Tertipis, Nikolaos
    Munck-Wikland, Eva
    Nasman, Anders
    Ramqvist, Torbjorn
    Dalianis, Tina
    Targeted sequencing of tonsillar and base of tongue cancer and human papillomavirus positive unknown primary of the head and neck reveals prognostic effects of mutated FGFR32017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 21, p. 35339-35350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus positive (HPV+) tonsillar cancer (TSCC), base of tongue cancer (BOTSCC) and unknown primary cancer of the head and neck (HNCUP) have better outcome than corresponding HPV- cancers. To find predictive markers for response to treatment, and correlations and differences in mutated oncogenes and suppressor genes between HPV+TSCC/BOTSSCC and HPV+ HNCUP and HPV- TSCC/BOTSCC targeted next-generation sequencing was performed of frequently mutated regions in 50 cancer related genes.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: DNA from 348 TSCC/BOTSCC and 20 HNCUP from patients diagnosed 2000-2011, was sequenced by the Ion Proton sequencing platform using the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 to identify frequently mutated regions in 50 cancer related genes. Ion Torrent Variant Caller software was used to call variants.

    RESULTS: 279 HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC, 46 HPV- TSCC/BOTSCC and 19 HPV+ HNCUP samples qualified for further analysis. Mutations/tumor were fewer in HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC and HNCUP, compared to HPV- tumors (0.92 vs. 1.32 vs. 1.68). Differences in mutation frequency of TP53 and PIK3CA were found between HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC and HNCUP and HPV- TSCC/BOTSCC. In HPV+TSCC/BOTSCC presence of FGFR3 mutations correlated to worse prognosis. Other correlations to survival within the groups were not disclosed.

    CONCLUSIONS: In HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC mutation of PIK3CA was most frequently observed, while TP53 mutations dominated in HPV- TSCC/BOTSCC. In HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC and HNCUP, mutations/tumor were similar in frequency and fewer compared to that in HPV- TSCC/BOTSCC. Notably, FGFR3 mutations in HPV+ TSCC/BOTSCC indicated worse prognosis.

  • 4. Bijnsdorp, Irene V.
    et al.
    Hodzic, Jasmina
    Lagerweij, Tonny
    Westerman, Bart
    Krijgsman, Oscar
    Broeke, Jurjen
    Verweij, Frederik
    Nilsson, R. Jonas A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Neurosurgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rozendaal, Lawrence
    van Beusechem, Victor W.
    van Moorselaar, Jeroen A.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Geldof, Albert A.
    miR-129-3p controls centrosome number in metastatic prostate cancer cells by repressing CP1102016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 13, p. 16676-16687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The centrosome plays a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis. However, it is unclear how abnormal centrosome numbers are regulated when prostate cancer (PCa) cells become metastatic. CP110 was previously described for its contribution of centrosome amplification (CA) and early development of aggressive cell behaviour. However its regulation in metastatic cells remains unclear. Here we identified miR-129-3p as a novel metastatic microRNA. CP110 was identified as its target protein. In PCa cells that have metastatic capacity, CP110 expression was repressed by miR-129-3p. High miR-129-3p expression levels increased cell invasion, while increasing CP110 levels decreased cell invasion. Overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in a decrease in the number of metastasis. In tissues of PCa patients, low CP110 and high miR-129-3p expression levels correlated with metastasis, but not with the expression of genes related to EMT. Furthermore, overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in excessive-CA (E-CA), and a change in F-actin distribution which is in agreement with their reduced metastatic capacity. Our data demonstrate that miR-129-3p functions as a CA gatekeeper in metastatic PCa cells by maintaining pro-metastatic centrosome amplification (CA) and preventing anti-metastatic E-CA.

  • 5.
    Björkblom, Benny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mörén, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johannesen, Tom Borge
    langseth, Hilde
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Metabolomic screening of pre-diagnostic serum samples identifies association between alpha- and gamma-tocopherols and glioblastoma risk2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 37043-37053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma is associated with poor prognosis with a median survival of one year. High doses of ionizing radiation is the only established exogenous risk factor. To explore new potential biological risk factors for glioblastoma, we investigated alterations in metabolite concentrations in pre-diagnosed serum samples from glioblastoma patients diagnosed up to 22 years after sample collection, and undiseased controls. The study points out a latent biomarker for future glioblastoma consisting of nine metabolites (gamma-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, erythritol, erythronic acid, myo-inositol, cystine, 2-keto-L-gluconic acid, hypoxanthine and xanthine) involved in antioxidant metabolism. We detected significantly higher serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol (p=0.0018) and gamma-tocopherol (p=0.0009) in future glioblastoma cases. Compared to their matched controls, the cases showed a significant average fold increase of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol levels: 1.2 for alpha-T (p=0.018) and 1.6 for gamma-T (p=0.003). These tocopherol levels were associated with a glioblastoma odds ratio of 1.7 (alpha-T, 95% CI: 1.0-3.0) and 2.1 (gamma-T, 95% CI: 1.2-3.8). Our exploratory metabolomics study detected elevated serum levels of a panel of molecules with antioxidant properties as well as oxidative stress generated compounds. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the association between the observed serum metabolite pattern and future glioblastoma development.

  • 6.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 656 53 Brno, Czech Republic; Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, Hôpital St. Louis, 75010 Paris, France.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Surgical Sciences/ENT, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gene expression changes in tumor free tongue tissue adjacent to tongue squamous cell carcinoma2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 19389-19402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the high frequency of loco-regional recurrences, which could be explained by changes in the field surrounding the tumor, patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck show poor survival. Here we identified a total of 554 genes as dysregulated in clinically tumor free tongue tissue in patients with tongue tumors when compared to healthy control tongue tissue. Among the top dysregulated genes when comparing control and tumor free tissue were those involved in apoptosis (CIDEC, MUC1, ZBTB16, PRNP, ECT2), immune response (IFI27) and differentiation (KRT36). Data suggest that these are important findings which can aid in earlier diagnosis of tumor development, a relapse or a novel squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, in the absence of histological signs of a tumor.

  • 7.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Troiano, Giuseppe
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Wang, Lixiao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Evidence that circulating proteins are more promising than miRNAs for identification of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 61, p. 103437-103448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research, squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue remains a devastating disease with a five-year survival of around 60%. Late detection and recurrence are the main causes for poor survival. The identification of circulating factors for early diagnosis and/or prognosis of cancer is a rapidly evolving field of interest, with the hope of finding stable and reliable markers of clinical significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating miRNAs and proteins as potential factors for distinguishing patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma from healthy controls. Array-based profiling of 372 miRNAs in plasma samples showed broad variations between different patients and did not show any evidence for their use in diagnosis of tongue cancer. Although one miRNA, miR-150, was significantly down-regulated in plasma from patients compared to controls. Surprisingly, the corresponding tumor tissue showed an up-regulation of miR-150. Among circulating proteins, 23 were identified as potential markers of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. These findings imply that circulating proteins are a more promising source of biomarkers for tongue squamous cell carcinomas than circulating miRNAs. The data also highlight that circulating markers are not always directly associated with tumor cell properties.

  • 8. Braadland, Peder Rustoen
    et al.
    Grytli, Helene Hartvedt
    Ramberg, Hakon
    Katz, Betina
    Kellman, Ralf
    Gauthier-Landry, Louis
    Fazli, Ladan
    Krobert, Kurt Allen
    Wang, Wanzhong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Levy, Finn Olav
    Bjartell, Anders
    Berge, Viktor
    Rennie, Paul S.
    Mellgren, Gunnar
    Maelandsmo, Gunhild Mari
    Svindland, Aud
    Barbier, Olivier
    Tasken, Kristin Austlid
    Low beta(2)-adrenergic receptor level may promote development of castration resistant prostate cancer and altered steroid metabolism2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1878-1894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in patients who have undergone androgen deprivation therapy are not fully understood. This is the first study to address whether beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2)- mediated signaling may affect CRPC progression in vivo. By immunohistochemical analyses, we observed that low levels of ADRB2 is associated with a more rapid development of CRPC in a Norwegian patient cohort. To elucidate mechanisms by which ADRB2 may affect CRPC development, we stably transfected LNCaP cells with shRNAs to mimic low and high expression of ADRB2. Two UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, involved in phase II metabolism of androgens, were strongly downregulated in two LNCaP shADRB2 cell lines. The low-ADRB2 LNCaP cell lines displayed lowered glucuronidation activities towards androgens than high-ADRB2 cells. Furthermore, increased levels of testosterone and enhanced androgen responsiveness were observed in LNCaP cells expressing low level of ADRB2. Interestingly, these cells grew faster than high-ADRB2 LNCaP cells, and sustained their low glucuronidation activity in castrated NOD/SCID mice. ADRB2 immunohistochemical staining intensity correlated with UGT2B15 staining intensity in independent TMA studies and with UGT2B17 in one TMA study. Similar to ADRB2, we show that low levels of UGT2B15 are associated with a more rapid CRPC progression. We propose a novel mechanism by which ADRB2 may affect the development of CRPC through downregulation of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17.

  • 9. Christianson, Helena C.
    et al.
    Menard, Julien A.
    Chandran, Vineesh Indira
    Bourseau-Guilmain, Erika
    Shevela, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lidfeldt, Jon
    Mansson, Ann-Sofie
    Pastorekova, Silvia
    Messinger, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.
    Belting, Mattias
    Tumor antigen glycosaminoglycan modification regulates antibody-drug conjugate delivery and cytotoxicity2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 40, p. 66960-66974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggressive cancers are characterized by hypoxia, which is a key driver of tumor development and treatment resistance. Proteins specifically expressed in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment thus represent interesting candidates for targeted drug delivery strategies. Carbonic anhydrase (CAIX) has been identified as an attractive treatment target as it is highly hypoxia specific and expressed at the cell-surface to promote cancer cell aggressiveness. Here, we find that cancer cell internalization of CAIX is negatively regulated by post-translational modification with chondroitin or heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains. We show that perturbed glycosaminoglycan modification results in increased CAIX endocytosis. We hypothesized that perturbation of CAIX glycosaminoglycan conjugation may provide opportunities for enhanced drug delivery to hypoxic tumor cells. In support of this concept, pharmacological inhibition of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis with xylosides significantly potentiated the internalization and cytotoxic activity of an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeted at CAIX. Moreover, cells expressing glycosaminoglycan-deficient CAIX were significantly more sensitive to ADC treatment as compared with cells expressing wild-type CAIX. We find that inhibition of CAIX endocytosis is associated with an increased localization of glycosaminoglycan-conjugated CAIX in membrane lipid raft domains stabilized by caveolin-1 clusters. The association of CAIX with caveolin-1 was partially attenuated by acidosis, i.e. another important feature of malignant tumors. Accordingly, we found increased internalization of CAIX at acidic conditions. These findings provide first evidence that intracellular drug delivery at pathophysiological conditions of malignant tumors can be attenuated by tumor antigen glycosaminoglycan modification, which is of conceptual importance in the future development of targeted cancer treatments.

  • 10. Ge, Rongbin
    et al.
    Wang, Zongwei
    Wu, Shulin
    Zhuo, Yangjia
    Otsetov, Aleksandar G
    Cai, Chao
    Zhong, Weide
    Wu, Chin-Lee
    Olumi, Aria F
    Metformin represses cancer cells via alternate pathways in N-cadherin expressing vs. N-cadherin deficient cells.2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metformin has emerged as a potential anticancer agent. Here, we demonstrate that metformin plays an anti-tumor role via repressing N-cadherin, independent of AMPK, in wild-type N-cadherin cancer cells. Ectopic-expression of N-cadherin develops metformin-resistant cancer cells, while suppression of N-cadherin sensitizes cancer to metformin. Manipulation of AMPK expression does not alter sensitivity of cancer to metformin. We show that NF-kappaB is a downstream molecule of N-cadherin and metformin regulates NF-kappaB signaling via suppressing N-cadherin. Moreover, we also suggest that TWIST1 is an upstream molecule of N-cadherin/NF-kappaB signaling and manipulation of TWIST1 expression changes the sensitivity of cancer cells to metformin. In contrast to the cells that express N-cadherin, in N-cadherin deficient cells, metformin plays an anti-tumor role via activation of AMPK. Ectopic expression of N-cadherin makes cancer more resistant to metformin. Therefore, we suggest that metformin's anti-cancer therapeutic effect is mediated through different molecular mechanism in wild-type vs. deficient N-cadherin cancer cells. At last, we selected 49 out of 984 patients' samples with prostatic cancer after radical prostatectomy (selection criteria: Gleason score ≥ 7 and all patients taking metformin) and showed levels of N-cadherin, p65 and AMPK could predict post-surgical recurrence in prostate cancer after treatment of metformin.

  • 11. Geoghegan, Fintan
    et al.
    Buckland, Robert J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Rogers, Eric T.
    Khalifa, Karima
    O'Connor, Emma B.
    Rooney, Mary F.
    Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Porter, Richard K.
    Bioenergetics of acquired cisplatin resistant H1299 non-small cell lung cancer and P31 mesothelioma cells2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 55, p. 94711-94725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired cisplatin resistance is a common feature of tumours following cancer treatment with cisplatin and also of non-small cell lung cancer (H1299) and mesothelioma (P31) cell lines exposed to cisplatin. To elucidate the cellular basis of acquired cisplatin resistance, a comprehensive bioenergetic analysis was undertaken. We demonstrate that cellular oxygen consumption was significantly decreased in cisplatin resistant cells and that the reduction was primarily due to reduced mitochondrial activity as a result of reduced mitochondrial abundance. The differential mitochondrial abundance was supported by data showing reduced sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), peroxisome-proliferator activator receptor-gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC1 alpha), sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) protein expression in resistant cells. Consistent with these data we observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and increased hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1 alpha) stabilization in cisplatin resistant cells when compared to cisplatin sensitive controls. We also observed an increase in AMP kinase subunit alpha 2 (AMPK alpha 2) transcripts and protein expression in resistant H1299 cells. mRNA expression was also reduced for cisplatin resistant H1299 cells in these genes, however the pattern was not consistent in resistant P31 cells. There was very little change in DNA methylation of these genes, suggesting that the cells are not stably reprogrammed epigenetically. Taken together, our data demonstrate reduced oxidative metabolism, reduced mitochondrial abundance, potential for increased glycolytic flux and increased ROS production in acquired cisplatin resistant cells. This suggests that the metabolic changes are a result of reduced SIRT3 expression and increased HIF-1 alpha stabilization.

  • 12. Gomzikova, Marina O.
    et al.
    Zhuravleva, Margarita N.
    Miftakhova, Regina R.
    Arkhipova, Svetlana S.
    Evtugin, Vladimir G.
    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.
    Kiyasov, Andrey P.
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Mongan, Nigel P.
    Pestell, Richard G.
    Rizvanov, Albert A.
    Cytochalasin B-induced membrane vesicles convey angiogenic activity of parental cells2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 41, p. 70496-70507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally occurring extracellular vesicles (EVs) play essential roles in intracellular communication and delivery of bioactive molecules. Therefore it has been suggested that EVs could be used for delivery of therapeutics. However, to date the therapeutic application of EVs has been limited by number of factors, including limited yield and full understanding of their biological activities. To address these issues, we analyzed the morphology, molecular composition, fusion capacity and biological activity of Cytochalasin B-induced membrane vesicles (CIMVs). The size of these vesicles was comparable to that of naturally occurring EVs. In addition, we have shown that CIMVs from human SH-SY5Y cells contain elevated levels of VEGF as compared to the parental cells, and stimulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  • 13.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Pro-invasive properties of Snail1 are regulated by sumoylation in response to TGFβ stimulation in cancer2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 58, p. 97703-97726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is a key regulator of epithelial-tomesenchymal transition (EMT) during embryogenesis and in tumors. The effect of TGF beta, on EMT, is conveyed by induction of the pro-invasive transcription factor Snail1. In this study, we report that TGF beta stimulates Snail1 sumoylation in aggressive prostate, breast and lung cancer cells. Sumoylation of Snail1 lysine residue 234 confers its transcriptional activity, inducing the expression of classical EMT genes, as well as TGF beta receptor I (T beta RI) and the transcriptional repressor Hes1. Mutation of Snail1 lysine residue 234 to arginine (K234R) abolished sumoylation of Snail1, as well as its migratory and invasive properties in human prostate cancer cells. An increased immunohistochemical expression of Snail1, Sumo1, T beta RI, Hes1, and c-Jun was observed in aggressive prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their functional roles in tumorigenesis.

  • 14. Hemminki, Kari
    et al.
    Chen, Bowang
    Kumar, Abhishek
    Melander, Olle
    Manjer, Jonas
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Folprecht, Gunnar
    Löffler, Harald
    Krämer, Alwin
    Försti, Asta
    Germline genetics of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) and its specific subtypes2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 16, p. 22140-22149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) is a fatal cancer diagnosed through metastases at various organs. Little is known about germline genetics of CUP which appears worth of a search in view of reported familial associations in CUP. In the present study, samples from CUP patients were identified from 2 Swedish biobanks and a German clinical trial, totaling 578 CUP patients and 7628 regionally matched controls. Diagnostic data specified the organ where metastases were diagnosed. We carried out a genome-wide association study on CUP cases and controls. In the whole sample set, 6 loci reached an allelic p-value in the range of 10-7 and were supported by data from the three centers. Three associations were located next to non-coding RNA genes. rs2660852 flanked 5'UTR of LTA4H (leukotriene A4 hydrolase), rs477145 was intronic to TIAM1 (T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastases) and rs2835931 was intronic to KCNJ6 (potassium channel, inwardly rectifying subfamily J, member 6). In analysis of subgroups of CUP patients (smokers, non-smokers and CUP with liver metastases) genome-wide significant associations were noted. For patients with liver metastases associations on chromosome 6 and 11, the latter including a cluster of genes DHCR7 and NADSYN1, encoding key enzymes in cholesterol and NAD synthesis, and KRTAP5-7, encoding a keratin associated protein. This first GWAS on CUP provide preliminary evidence that germline genes relating to inflammation (LTA4H), metastatic promotion (TIAM1) in association with lipid metabolic disturbance (chromosome 11 cluster) may contribute to the risk of CUP.

  • 15. Isaksson, Helena S.
    et al.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Whole genome expression profiling of blood cells in ovarian cancer patients: prognostic impact of the CYP1B1, MTSS1, NCALD, and NOP14 genes2014In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian cancer patients with different tumor stages and cell differentiation might be distinguished from each other by gene expression profiles in whole blood cell mRNA by the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Array. We also examined if there is any association with other clinical variables, response to therapy, and residual tumor burden after surgery. Patients were divided into two groups, one with poor prognosis, advanced stage and poorly differentiated tumors (n = 22), and one group with good prognosis, early stage and well-to medium differentiated tumors (n = 11). Six genes were found to be differentially expressed: the PDIA3, LYAR, NOP14, NCALD and MTSS1 genes were down-regulated and the CYP1B1 gene expression was up-regulated in the poor prognosis group, all with p value <0.05, adjusted for mass comparison. In survival analyses, CYP1B1, MTSS1, NCALD and NOP14 remained significantly different (p<0.05). Patient groups did not differ in any transcript related to acute phase or immune responses. This minimal gene expression signature of prognostic ovarian cancer-related genes opens up an avenue for more practicable monitoring of ovarian cancer patients by simple peripheral blood tests, which may evolve into a tool to guide selection of curative and postoperative supportive therapies.

  • 16.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Karin
    Månsson, Marianne
    Björkman, Jens
    Rohlova, Eva
    Åhs, Daniel
    Brisby, Helena
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Welén, Karin
    Circulating tumor cells mirror bone metastatic phenotype in prostate cancer2018In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 50, p. 29403-29413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in prostate cancer (PC) because they derive from primary tumor and metastatic tissues. In this study, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to compare the expression profiles of 41 PC-related genes between paired CTC and spinal column metastasis samples from 22 PC patients that underwent surgery for spinal cord compression. We observed good concordance between the gene expression profiles in the CTC and metastasis samples in most of the PC patients. Expression of nine genes (AGR2, AKR1C3, AR, CDH1, FOLH1, HER2, KRT19, MDK, and SPINK1) showed a significant correlation between the CTC and metastasis samples. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed a similar grouping of PC patients based on the expression of these nine genes in both CTC and metastasis samples. Our findings demonstrate that CTCs mirror gene expression patterns in tissue metastasis samples from PC patients. Although low detection frequency of certain genes is a limitation in CTCs, our results indicate the potential for CTC phenotyping as a tool to improve individualized therapy in metastatic prostate cancer.

  • 17. Lindqvist, C. Marten
    et al.
    Lundmark, Anders
    Nordlund, Jessica
    Freyhult, Eva
    Ekman, Diana
    Almlof, Jonas Carlsson
    Raine, Amanda
    Overnas, Elin
    Abrahamsson, Jonas
    Frost, Britt-Marie
    Grander, Dan
    Heyman, Mats
    Palle, Josefine
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology.
    Lonnerholm, Gudmar
    Berglund, Eva C.
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Deep targeted sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia unveils distinct mutational patterns between genetic subtypes and novel relapse-associated genes2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 39, p. 64071-64088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To characterize the mutational patterns of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we performed deep next generation sequencing of 872 cancer genes in 172 diagnostic and 24 relapse samples from 172 pediatric ALL patients. We found an overall greater mutational burden and more driver mutations in T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients compared to B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) patients. In addition, the majority of the mutations in T-ALL had occurred in the original leukemic clone, while most of the mutations in BCP-ALL were subclonal. BCP-ALL patients carrying any of the recurrent translocations ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL or TCF3-PBX1 harbored few mutations in driver genes compared to other BCP-ALL patients. Specifically in BCP-ALL, we identified ATRX as a novel putative driver gene and uncovered an association between somatic mutations in the Notch signaling pathway at ALL diagnosis and increased risk of relapse. Furthermore, we identified EP300, ARID1A and SH2B3 as relapse-associated genes. The genes highlighted in our study were frequently involved in epigenetic regulation, associated with germline susceptibility to ALL, and present in minor subclones at diagnosis that became dominant at relapse. We observed a high degree of clonal heterogeneity and evolution between diagnosis and relapse in both BCP-ALL and T-ALL, which could have implications for the treatment efficiency.

  • 18.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    VHL status regulates transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways in renal cell carcinoma2018In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 23, p. 16297-16310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate the role of pVHL in the regulation of TGF-β signaling pathways in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) as well as in non-ccRCC; the expression of pVHL, and the TGF-β pathway components and their association with clinicopathological parameters and patient’s survival were explored. Tissue samples from 143 ccRCC and 58 non-ccRCC patients were examined by immunoblot. ccRCC cell lines were utilized for mechanistic in-vitro studies. Expression levels of pVHL were significantly lower in ccRCC compared with non-ccRCC. Non-ccRCC and ccRCC pVHL-High expressed similar levels of pVHL. Expression of the TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5) and intra-cellular domain were significantly higher in ccRCC compared with non-ccRCC. In non-ccRCC, expressions of ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, and PAI-1 had no association with clinicopathological parameters and survival. In ccRCC pVHL-Low, ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSMAD2/3, and PAI-1 were significantly related with tumor stage, size, and survival. In ccRCC pVHL-High, the expression of PAI-1 was associated with stage and survival. In-vitro studies revealed that pVHL interacted with ALK5 to downregulate its expression through K48-linked poly-ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus negatively controlling TGF-β induced cancer cell invasiveness. The pVHL status controls the ALK5 and can thereby regulate the TGF-β pathway, aggressiveness of tumors, and survival of the ccRCC and non-ccRCC patients.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, R. Jonas A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurosurgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam ; ThromboDx B.V., Amsterdam.
    Karachaliou, Niki
    Berenguer, Jordi
    Gimenez-Capitan, Ana
    Schellen, Pepijn
    Teixido, Cristina
    Tannous, Jihane
    Kuiper, Justine L.
    Drees, Esther
    Grabowska, Magda
    van Keulen, Marte
    Heideman, Danielle A. M.
    Thunnissen, Erik
    Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.
    Viteri, Santiago
    Tannous, Bakhos A.
    Drozdowskyj, Ana
    Rosell, Rafael
    Smit, Egbert F.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Rearranged EML4-ALK fusion transcripts sequester in circulating blood platelets and enable blood-based crizotinib response monitoring in non-small-cell lung cancer2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1066-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Non-small-cell lung cancers harboring EML4-ALK rearrangements are sensitive to crizotinib. However, despite initial response, most patients will eventually relapse, and monitoring EML4-ALK rearrangements over the course of treatment may help identify these patients. However, challenges associated with serial tumor biopsies have highlighted the need for blood-based assays for the monitoring of biomarkers. Platelets can sequester RNA released by tumor cells and are thus an attractive source for the non-invasive assessment of biomarkers. Methods: EML4-ALK rearrangements were analyzed by RT-PCR in platelets and plasma isolated from blood obtained from 77 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, 38 of whom had EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors. In a subset of 29 patients with EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors who were treated with crizotinib, EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets were correlated with progression-free and overall survival. Results: RT-PCR demonstrated 65% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets. In the subset of 29 patients treated with crizotinib, progression-free survival was 3.7 months for patients with EML4-ALK+ platelets and 16 months for those with EML4-ALK- platelets (hazard ratio, 3.5; P = 0.02). Monitoring of EML4-ALK rearrangements in the platelets of one patient over a period of 30 months revealed crizotinib resistance two months prior to radiographic disease progression. Conclusions: Platelets are a valuable source for the non-invasive detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements and may prove useful for predicting and monitoring outcome to crizotinib, thereby improving clinical decisions based on radiographic imaging alone.

  • 20. Roodakker, Kenney R.
    et al.
    Elsir, Tamador
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.
    Hagerstrand, Daniel
    Carison, Joseph
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center, Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Rosell, Johan
    Soderkvist, Peter
    Stupp, Roger
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Nister, Monica
    Malmstrom, Annika
    Smits, Anja
    PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 45, p. 72431-72442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing lowgrade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  • 21. Roy, Ananya
    et al.
    Attarha, Sanaz
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik
    Swartling, Fredrik J.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.
    Smits, Anja
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Serglycin as a potential biomarker for glioma: association of serglycin expression, extent of mast cell recruitment and glioblastoma progression2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 15, p. 24815-24827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serglycin is an intracellular proteoglycan with a unique ability to adopt highly divergent structures by glycosylation with variable types of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) when expressed by different cell types. Serglycin is overexpressed in aggressive cancers suggesting its protumorigenic role. In this study, we explored the expression of serglycin in human glioma and its correlation with survival and immune cell infiltration. We demonstrate that serglycin is expressed in glioma and that increased expression predicts poor survival of patients. Analysis of serglycin expression in a large cohort of low-and high-grade human glioma samples reveals that its expression is grade dependent and is positively correlated with mast cell (MC) infiltration. Moreover, serglycin expression in patient-derived glioma cells is significantly increased upon MC co-culture. This is also accompanied by increased expression of CXCL12, CXCL10, as well as markers of cancer progression, including CD44, ZEB1 and vimentin. In conclusion, these findings indicate the importance of infiltrating MCs in glioma by modulating signaling cascades involving serglycin, CD44 and ZEB1. The present investigation reveals serglycin as a potential prognostic marker for glioma and demonstrates an association with the extent of MC recruitment and glioma progression, uncovering potential future therapeutic opportunities for patients.

  • 22. Sarwar, Martuza
    et al.
    Semenas, Julius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Division of Experimental Cancer Research, Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, Sweden.
    Miftakhova, Regina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Division of Experimental Cancer Research, Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Genetics, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia.
    Simoulis, Athanasios
    Robinson, Brian
    Wingren, Anette Gjorloff
    Mongan, Nigel P.
    Heery, David M.
    Johnsson, Heather
    Abrahamsson, Per-Anders
    Dizeyi, Nishtman
    Luo, Jun
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Division of Experimental Cancer Research, Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, Sweden.
    Targeted suppression of AR-V7 using PIP5K1 alpha inhibitor overcomes enzalutamide resistance in prostate cancer cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 39, p. 63065-63081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One mechanism of resistance of prostate cancer (PCa) to enzalutamide (MDV3100) treatment is the increased expression of AR variants lacking the ligand binding-domain, the best characterized of which is AR-V7. We have previously reported that Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase alpha (PIP5K alpha), is a lipid kinase that links to CDK1 and AR pathways. The discovery of PIP5K alpha inhibitor highlight the potential of PIP5K1 alpha as a drug target in PCa. In this study, we show that AR-V7 expression positively correlates with PIP5K1 alpha in tumor specimens from PCa patients. Overexpression of AR-V7 increases PIP5K1 alpha, promotes rapid growth of PCa in xenograft mice, whereas inhibition of PIP5K1 alpha by its inhibitor ISA-2011B suppresses the growth and invasiveness of xenograft tumors overexpressing AR-V7. PIP5K1 alpha is a key co-factor for both AR-V7 and AR, which are present as protein-protein complexes predominantly in the nucleus of PCa cells. In addition, PIP5K1 alpha and CDK1 influence AR-V7 expression also through AKT-associated mechanism dependent on PTEN-status. ISA-2011B disrupts protein stabilization of AR-V7 which is dependent on PIP5K1 alpha, leading to suppression of invasive growth of AR-V7-high tumors in xenograft mice. Our study suggests that combination of enzalutamide and PIP5K1 alpha may have a significant impact on refining therapeutic strategies to circumvent resistance to antiandrogen therapies.

  • 23. Smits, Michiel
    et al.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Mir, Shahryar E
    van der Stoop, Petra M
    Hulleman, Esther
    Niers, Johanna M
    de Witt Hamer, Phillip C
    Marquez, Victor E
    Cloos, Jacqueline
    Krichevsky, Anna M
    Noske, David P
    Tannous, Bakhos A
    Würdinger, Thomas
    miR-101 is down-regulated in glioblastoma resulting in EZH2-induced proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis2010In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 1, no 8, p. 710-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor with dismal prognosis. GBM patients have a median survival of less than 2 years. GBM is characterized by fast cell proliferation, infiltrative migration, and by the induction of angiogenesis. MicroRNAs and polycomb group (PcG) proteins have emerged as important regulators of gene expression.

    METHODS: Here we determined that miR-101 is down-regulated in GBM, resulting in overexpression of the miR-101 target PcG protein EZH2, a histone methyltransferase affecting gene expression profiles in an epigenetic manner.

    RESULTS: Inhibition of EZH2 in vitro by pre-miR-101, EZH2 siRNA, or small molecule DZNep, attenuated GBM cell growth, migration/invasion, and GBM-induced endothelial tubule formation. In addition, for each biological process we identified ontology-associated transcripts that significantly correlate with EZH2 expression. Inhibition of EZH2 in vivo by systemic DZNep administration in a U87-Fluc-mCherry GBM xenograft mouse imaging model resulted in reduced tumor growth.

    CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that EZH2 has a versatile function in GBM progression and that its overexpression is at least partly due to decreased miR-101 expression. Inhibition of EZH2 may be a potential therapeutic strategy to target GBM proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis.

  • 24. Song, Jie
    et al.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    TGFβ activates PI3K-AKT signaling via TRAF62017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 59, p. 99205-99206Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Song, Jie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Mu, Yabing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Chunyan
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Miaczynska, Marta
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Landström, Marene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    APPL proteins promote TGF beta-induced nuclear transport of the TGF beta type I receptor intracellular domain2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 279-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) is produced by several types of cancers, including prostate cancer, and promote tumour progression in autocrine and paracrine manners. In response to ligand binding, the TGF beta type I receptor (T beta RI) activates Smad and non-Smad signalling pathways. The ubiquitin-ligase tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) was recently linked to regulate intramembrane proteolytic cleavage of the T beta RI in cancer cells. Subsequently, the intracellular domain (ICD) of T beta RI enters in an unknown manner into the nucleus, where it promotes the transcription of pro-invasive genes, such as MMP2 and MMP9. Here we show that the endocytic adaptor molecules APPL1 and APPL2 are required for TGF beta-induced nuclear translocation of T beta RI-ICD and for cancer cell invasiveness of human prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, APPL proteins were found to be expressed at high levels in aggressive prostate cancer tissues, and to be associated with T beta RI in a TRAF6-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the APPL-T beta RI complex promotes prostate tumour progression, and may serve as a prognostic marker.

  • 26.
    Stäubert, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Broom, Oliver Jay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Nordström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 19706-19720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them. We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation. We found HCA(1) and HCA(3) mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid beta-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death. Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  • 27. Troiano, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Caponio, Vito Carlo Alberto
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo
    Sgaramella, Nicola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wang, Lixiao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of the long non-coding RNA HOTAIR as a prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a systematic review and meta-analysis2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 42, p. 73029-73036Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often dysregulated in cancer tissue and seem to play an important role in neoplastic processes. Recent studies have shown that the HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) may play a role as a marker of prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of studies focused on the prognostic role of HOTAIR in SCCHN.

    Results: At the end of the selection process, four studies were considered eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis, comprising a total of 271 patients. Meta-analysis revealed that high expression of HOTAIR was associated with poor overall survival (HR, 1.90; 95% CI: [1.42, 2.53]; p < 0,0001), advanced tumor stage (OR, 3.44; 95% CI: [1.84, 6.43]; p < 0,001) and lymph-node metastasis (OR, 3.31; 95% CI: [1.24, 8.79]; p = 0,02).

    Materials and Methods: The literature search was performed in the following databases: PUBMED, SCOPUS, EMBASE and Web of Science, in order to find studies that met the inclusion criteria.

    Conclusions: Findings from this systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that HOTAIR represents a potential biomarker of prognosis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  • 28.
    Tumkur Sitaram, Raviprakash
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Medical Biosciences.
    Mallikarjuna, Pramod
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Transforming growth factor-β promotes aggressiveness and invasion of clear cell renal cell carcinoma2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 35917-35931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular mechanisms whereby transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression is elusive. The cell membrane bound TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5), was recently found to undergo proteolytic cleavage in aggressive prostate cancer cells, resulting in liberation and subsequent nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain (ICD), suggesting that ALK5-ICD might be a useful cancer biomarker. Herein, the possible correlation between ALK5 full length (ALK5-FL) and ALK5-ICD protein, phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3), and expression of TGF-β target gene PAI-1, was investigated in a clinical ccRCC material, in relation to tumor grade, stage, size and cancer specific survival. Expression of ALK5-FL, ALK5-ICD, pSmad2/3 and PAI-1 protein levels were significantly higher in higher stage and associated with adverse survival. ALK5-ICD, pSmad2/3 and PAI-1 correlated with higher grade, and ALK5-FL, pSmad2/3 and PAI-1 protein levels were significantly correlated with larger tumor size. Moreover, the functional role of the TGF-β - ALK5-ICD pathway were investigated in two ccRCC cell lines by treatment with ADAM/MMP2 inhibitor TAPI-2, which prevented TGF-β-induced ALK5-ICD generation, nuclear translocation, as well as cell invasion. The present study demonstrated that canonical TGF-β Smad2/3 pathway and generation of ALK5-ICD correlates with poor survival and invasion of ccRCC in vitro.

  • 29. Zhang, Mingfeng
    et al.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Obazee, Ofure
    Jia, Jinping
    Childs, Erica J.
    Hoskins, Jason
    Figlioli, Gisella
    Mocci, Evelina
    Collins, Irene
    Chung, Charles C.
    Hautman, Christopher
    Arslan, Alan A.
    Beane-Freeman, Laura
    Bracci, Paige M.
    Buring, Julie
    Duell, Eric J.
    Gallinger, Steven
    Giles, Graham G.
    Goodman, Gary E.
    Goodman, Phyllis J.
    Kamineni, Aruna
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Kulke, Matthew H.
    Malats, Nuria
    Olson, Sara H.
    Sesso, Howard D.
    Visvanathan, Kala
    White, Emily
    Zheng, Wei
    Abnet, Christian C.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Andreotti, Gabriella
    Brais, Lauren
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Basso, Daniela
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Bijlsma, Maarten F.
    Brenner, Hermann
    Burdette, Laurie
    Campa, Daniele
    Caporaso, Neil E.
    Capurso, Gabriele
    Cavestro, Giulia Martina
    Cotterchio, Michelle
    Costello, Eithne
    Elena, Joanne
    Boggi, Ugo
    Gaziano, J. Michael
    Gazouli, Maria
    Giovannucci, Edward L.
    Goggins, Michael
    Gross, Myron
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Hassan, Manal
    Helzlsouer, Kathy J.
    Hu, Nan
    Hunter, David J.
    Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta
    Jenab, Mazda
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Klein, Eric A.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Kupcinskas, Juozas
    Kurtz, Robert C.
    Landi, Maria T.
    Landi, Stefano
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Mambrini, Andrea
    Mannisto, Satu
    Milne, Roger L.
    Neale, Rachel E.
    Oberg, Ann L.
    Panico, Salvatore
    Patel, Alpa V.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Pezzilli, Raffaele
    Porta, Miquel
    Purdue, Mark
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Rothman, Nathaniel
    Scarpa, Aldo
    Scelo, Ghislaine
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Silverman, Debra T.
    Soucek, Pavel
    Strobel, Oliver
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Malecka-Panas, Ewa
    Taylor, Philip R.
    Tavano, Francesca
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Thornquist, Mark
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tobias, Geoffrey S.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Vashist, Yogesh
    Vodicka, Pavel
    Wactawski-Wende, Jean
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    Yu, Herbert
    Yu, Kai
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Li, Donghui
    Fuchs, Charles
    Hoover, Robert
    Hartge, Patricia
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Petersen, Gloria M.
    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S.
    Wolpin, Brian M.
    Kraft, Peter
    Klein, Alison P.
    Canzian, Federico
    Amundadottir, Laufey T.
    Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.212016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 41, p. 66328-66343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10(-15)), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10(-9)) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10(-8)). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 (NR5A2), chr8q24.21 (MYC) and chr5p15.33 (CLPTM1L-TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal (n = 10) and tumor (n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10(-8)). This finding was validated in a second set of paired (n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10(-4)-2.0x10(-3)). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

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