umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aguilo, Francesca
    et al.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
    Li, SiDe
    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan
    Sancho, Ana
    Benko, Sabina
    Zhang, Fan
    Vashisht, Ajay
    Rengasamy, Madhumitha
    Andino, Blanca
    Chen, Chih-hung
    Zhou, Felix
    Qian, Chengmin
    Zhou, Ming-Ming
    Wohlschlegel, James A
    Zhang, Weijia
    Suchy, Frederick J
    Walsh, Martin J
    Deposition of 5-Methylcytosine on Enhancer RNAs Enables the Coactivator Function of PGC-1α2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 479-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in adapted metabolic responses. PGC-1α is dynamically methylated and unmethylated at the residue K779 by the methyltransferase SET7/9 and the Lysine Specific Demethylase 1A (LSD1), respectively. Interactions of methylated PGC-1α[K779me] with the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex, the Mediator members MED1 and MED17, and the NOP2/Sun RNA methytransferase 7 (NSUN7) reinforce transcription, and are concomitant with the m(5)C mark on enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Consistently, loss of Set7/9 and NSun7 in liver cell model systems resulted in depletion of the PGC-1α target genes Pfkl, Sirt5, Idh3b, and Hmox2, which was accompanied by a decrease in the eRNAs levels associated with these loci. Enrichment of m(5)C within eRNA species coincides with metabolic stress of fasting in vivo. Collectively, these findings illustrate the complex epigenetic circuitry imposed by PGC-1α at the eRNA level to fine-tune energy metabolism.

  • 2.
    Boal, Frédéric
    et al.
    INSERM U1048, I2MC and Universite´ Paul Sabatier, 31432 Toulouse, France.
    Puhar, Andrea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). INSERM U1202, Unite´ de Pathogénie Microbienne Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France.
    Xuereb, Jean-Marie
    INSERM U1048, I2MC and Universite´ Paul Sabatier, 31432 Toulouse, France.
    Kunduzova, Oksana
    INSERM U1048, I2MC and Universite´ Paul Sabatier, 31432 Toulouse, France.
    Sansonetti, Philippe J.
    INSERM U1202, Unite´ de Pathogénie Microbienne Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France.
    Payrastre, Bernard
    INSERM U1048, I2MC and Universite´ Paul Sabatier, 31432 Toulouse, France; .
    Tronchére, Héléne
    INSERM U1048, I2MC and Universite´ Paul Sabatier, 31432 Toulouse, France.
    PI5P Triggers ICAM-1 Degradation in Shigella Infected Cells, Thus Dampening Immune Cell Recruitment2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 750-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shigella flexneri, the pathogen responsible for bacillary dysentery, has evolved multiple strategies to control the inflammatory response. Here, we show that Shigella subverts the subcellular trafficking of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a key molecule in immune cell recruitment, in a mechanism dependent on the injected bacterial enzyme IpgD and its product, the lipid mediator PI5P. Overexpression of IpgD, but not a phosphatase dead mutant, induced the internalization and the degradation of ICAM-1 in intestinal epithelial cells. Remarkably, addition of permeant PI5P reproduced IpgD effects and led to the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment. Finally, these results were confirmed in an in vivo model of Shigella infection where IpgD-dependent ICAM-1 internalization reduced neutrophil adhesion. In conclusion, we describe here an immune evasion mechanism used by the pathogen Shigella to divert the host cell trafficking machinery in order to reduce immune cell recruitment.

  • 3. Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria
    et al.
    Prokopec, Kajsa E.
    Boura, Vanessa F.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Sohn, Silke
    Ostling, Jeanette
    Dahan, Rony
    Harris, Robert A.
    Rantalainen, Mattias
    Klevebring, Daniel
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Brage, Suzanne Egyhazi
    Fuxe, Jonas
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Li, Fubin
    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.
    Karlsson, Mikael C. I.
    Reprogramming Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Antibody Targeting Inhibits Cancer Progression and Metastasis2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 2000-2011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumors are composed of multiple cell types besides the tumor cells themselves, including innate immune cells such as macrophages. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells present in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Here, they contribute to immunosuppression, enabling the establishment and persistence of solid tumors as well as metastatic dissemination. We have found that the pattern recognition scavenger receptor MARCO defines a subtype of suppressive TAMs and is linked to clinical outcome. An anti-MARCO monoclonal antibody was developed, which induces anti-tumor activity in breast and colon carcinoma, as well as in melanoma models through reprogramming-TAM-populations to a pro-inflammatory phenotype and increasing tumor immunogenicity. This anti-tumor activity is dependent on the inhibitory Fc-receptor, Fc gamma RIIB, and also enhances the efficacy of checkpoint therapy. These results demonstrate that immunotherapies using antibodies designed to modify myeloid cells of the TME represent a promising mode of cancer treatment.

  • 4. Gerold, Gisa
    et al.
    Meissner, Felix
    Bruening, Janina
    Welsch, Kathrin
    Perin, Paula M
    Baumert, Thomas F
    Vondran, Florian W
    Kaderali, Lars
    Marcotrigiano, Joseph
    Khan, Abdul G
    Mann, Matthias
    Rice, Charles M
    Pietschmann, Thomas
    Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry2015In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 864-878, article id S2211-1247(15)00689-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1), which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  • 5. Goldberg, Emily L.
    et al.
    Asher, Jennifer L.
    Molony, Ryan D.
    Shaw, Albert C.
    Zeiss, Caroline J.
    Wang, Chao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Herzog, Raimund I.
    Iwasaki, Akiko
    Dixit, Vishwa Deep
    beta-Hydroxybutyrate deactivates Neutrophil NLRP3 inflammasome to relieve gout flares2017In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 2077-2087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging and lipotoxicity are two major risk factors for gout that are linked by the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Neutrophil-mediated production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) drives gouty flares that cause joint destruction, intense pain, and fever. However, metabolites that impact neutrophil inflammasome remain unknown. Here, we identified that ketogenic diet (KD) increases beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and alleviates urate crystal-induced gout without impairing immune defense against bacterial infection. BHB inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome in S100A9 fibril-primed and urate crystal-activated macrophages, which serve to recruit inflammatory neutrophils in joints. Consistent with reduced gouty flares in rats fed a ketogenic diet, BHB blocked IL-1 beta in neutrophils in a NLRP3-dependent manner in mice and humans irrespective of age. Mechanistically, BHB inhibited the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophils by reducing priming and assembly steps. Collectively, our studies show that BHB, a known alternate metabolic fuel, is also an anti-inflammatory molecule that may serve as a treatment for gout.

  • 6. Hillier, Charles
    et al.
    Pardo, Mercedes
    Yu, Lu
    Bushell, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Sanderson, Theo
    Metcalf, Tom
    Herd, Colin
    Anar, Burcu
    Rayner, Julian C.
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Choudhary, Jyoti S.
    Landscape of the Plasmodium Interactome Reveals Both Conserved and Species-Specific Functionality2019In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1635-1647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria represents a major global health issue, and the identification of new intervention targets remains an urgent priority. This search is hampered by more than one-third of the genes of malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites being uncharacterized. We report a large-scale protein interaction network in Plasmodium schizonts, generated by combining blue native-polyacrylamide electrophoresis with quantitative mass spectrometry and machine learning. This integrative approach, spanning 3 species, identifies > 20,000 putative protein interactions, organized into 600 protein clusters. We validate selected interactions, assigning functions in chromatin regulation to previously unannotated proteins and suggesting a role for an EELM2 domain-containing protein and a putative microrchidia protein as mechanistic links between AP2-domain transcription factors and epigenetic regulation. Our interactome represents a high-confidence map of the native organization of core cellular processes in Plasmodium parasites. The network reveals putative functions for uncharacterized proteins, provides mechanistic and structural insight, and uncovers potential alternative therapeutic targets.

  • 7.
    Holst, Mikkel Roland
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Vidal-Quadras, Maite
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Larsson, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Song, Jie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hubert, Madlen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundmark, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis Suppresses Cancer Cell Blebbing and Invasion2017In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1893-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular blebbing, caused by local alterations in cellsurface tension, has been shown to increase the invasiveness of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms balancing cell-surface dynamics and bleb formation remain elusive. Here, we show that an acute reduction in cell volume activates clathrinindependent endocytosis. Hence, a decrease in surface tension is buffered by the internalization of the plasma membrane (PM) lipid bilayer. Membrane invagination and endocytosis are driven by the tension- mediated recruitment of the membrane sculpting and GTPase-activating protein GRAF1 (GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1) to the PM. Disruption of this regulation by depleting cells of GRAF1 or mutating key phosphatidylinositol- interacting amino acids in the protein results in increased cellular blebbing and promotes the 3D motility of cancer cells. Our data support a role for clathrin-independent endocytic machinery in balancing membrane tension, which clarifies the previously reported role of GRAF1 as a tumor suppressor.

  • 8. Krypotou, Emilia
    et al.
    Scortti, Mariela
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Oelker, Melanie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Luisi, Ben F.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Vazquez-Boland, Jose
    Control of Bacterial Virulence through the Peptide Signature of the Habitat2019In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1815-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To optimize fitness, pathogens selectively activate their virulence program upon host entry. Here, we report that the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes exploits exogenous oligopeptides, a ubiquitous organic N source, to sense the environment and control the activity of its virulence transcriptional activator, PrfA. Using a genetic screen in adsorbent- treated ( PrfA-inducing) medium, we found that PrfA is functionally regulated by the balance between activating and inhibitory nutritional peptides scavenged via the Opp transport system. Activating peptides provide essential cysteine precursor for the PrfA-inducing cofactor glutathione ( GSH). Non-cysteine-containing peptides cause promiscuous PrfA inhibition. Biophysical and co-crystallization studies reveal that peptides inhibit PrfA through steric blockade of the GSH binding site, a regulation mechanism directly linking bacterial virulence and metabolism. L. monocytogenes mutant analysis in macrophages and our functional data support a model in which changes in the balance of antagonistic Oppimported oligopeptides promote PrfA induction intra-cellularly and PrfA repression outside the host.

  • 9.
    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Schultz, Sebastian W.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Alkhori, Liza
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Cilia-Mediated Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila2014In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 672-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cilia mediate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrates and Hh deregulation results in several clinical manifestations, such as obesity, cognitive disabilities, developmental malformations, and various cancers. Drosophila cells are nonciliated during development, which has led to the assumption that cilia-mediated Hh signaling is restricted to vertebrates. Here, we identify and characterize a cilia-mediated Hh pathway in Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons. We demonstrate that several fundamental key aspects of the vertebrate cilia pathway, such as ciliary localization of Smoothened and the requirement of the intraflagellar transport system, are present in Drosophila. We show that Cos2 and Fused are required for the ciliary transport of Smoothened and that cilia mediate the expression of the Hh pathway target genes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Hh signaling in Drosophila can be mediated by two pathways and that the ciliary Hh pathway is conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates.

  • 10. Leitner, Johannes
    et al.
    Retzer, Katarzyna
    Malenica, Nenad
    Bartkeviciute, Rasa
    Lucyshyn, Doris
    Jäger, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Korbei, Barbara
    Byström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Luschnig, Christian
    Meta-regulation of Arabidopsis Auxin Responses Depends on tRNA Maturation2015In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 516-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar transport of the phytohormone auxin throughout plants shapes morphogenesis and is subject to stringent and specific control. Here, we identify basic cellular activities connected to translational control of gene expression as sufficient to specify auxin-mediated development. Mutants in subunits of Arabidopsis Elongator, a protein complex modulating translational efficiency via maturation of tRNAs, exhibit defects in auxin-controlled developmental processes, associated with reduced abundance of PIN-formed (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Similar anomalies are observed upon interference with tRNA splicing by downregulation of RNA ligase (AtRNL), pointing to a general role of tRNA maturation in auxin signaling. Elongator Protein 6 (ELP6) and AtRNL expression patterns underline an involvement in adjusting PIN protein levels, whereas rescue of mutant defects by auxin indicates rate-limiting activities in auxin-controlled organogenesis. This emphasizes mechanisms in which auxin serves as a bottleneck for plant morphogenesis, translating common cellular activities into defined developmental readouts.

  • 11. Liew, Li Phing
    et al.
    Lim, Zun Yi
    Cohen, Matan
    Kong, Ziqing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Marjavaara, Lisette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Bell, Stephen D
    Hydroxyurea-Mediated Cytotoxicity Without Inhibition of Ribonucleotide Reductase2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1657-1670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many organisms, hydroxyurea (HU) inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase, leading to lowered cellular pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The reduced levels for DNA precursors is believed to cause replication fork stalling. Upon treatment of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus with HU, we observe dose-dependent cell cycle arrest, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, stalled replication forks, and elevated levels of recombination structures. However, Sulfolobus has a HU-insensitive class II ribonucleotide reductase, and we reveal that HU treatment does not significantly impact cellular DNA precursor pools. Profiling of protein and transcript levels reveals modulation of a specific subset of replication initiation and cell division genes. Notably, the selective loss of the regulatory subunit of the primase correlates with cessation of replication initiation and stalling of replication forks. Furthermore, we find evidence for a detoxification response induced by HU treatment.

  • 12. Nehme, Ralda
    et al.
    Zuccaro, Emanuela
    Ghosh, Sulagna Dia
    Li, Chenchen
    Sherwood, John L.
    Pietilainen, Olli
    Barrett, Lindy E.
    Limone, Francesco
    Worringer, Kathleen A.
    Kommineni, Sravya
    Zang, Ying
    Cacchiarelli, Davide
    Meissner, Alex
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Haggarty, Stephen
    Madison, Jon
    Muller, Matthias
    Arlotta, Paola
    Fu, Zhanyan
    Feng, Guoping
    Eggan, Kevin
    Combining NGN2 Programming with Developmental Patterning Generates Human Excitatory Neurons with NMDAR-Mediated Synaptic Transmission2018In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 2509-2523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcription factor programming of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) has emerged as an approach to generate human neurons for disease modeling. However, programming schemes produce a variety of cell types, and those neurons that are made often retain an immature phenotype, which limits their utility in modeling neuronal processes, including synaptic transmission. We report that combining NGN2 programming with SMAD and WNT inhibition generates human patterned induced neurons (hpiNs). Single-cell analyses showed that hpiN cultures contained cells along a developmental continuum, ranging from poorly differentiated neuronal progenitors to well-differentiated, excitatory glutamatergic neurons. The most differentiated neurons could be identified using a CAMK2A::GFP reporter gene and exhibited greater functionality, including NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission. We conclude that utilizing single-cell and reporter gene approaches for selecting successfully programmed cells for study will greatly enhance the utility of hpiNs and other programmed neuronal populations in the modeling of nervous system disorders.

  • 13. Prigge, Justin R.
    et al.
    Coppo, Lucia
    Martin, Sebastin S.
    Ogata, Fernando
    Miller, Colin G.
    Bruschwein, Michael D.
    Orlicky, David J.
    Shearn, Colin T.
    Kundert, Jean A.
    Lytchier, Julia
    Herr, Alix E.
    Mattsson, Åse
    Taylor, Matthew P.
    Gustafsson, Tomas N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Division of Biochemistry, Medical Biochemistry & Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arnér, Elias S. J.
    Holmgren, Arne
    Schmidt, Edward E.
    Hepatocyte Hyperproliferation upon Liver-Specific Co-disruption of Thioredoxin-1, Thioredoxin Reductase-1, and Glutathione Reductase2017In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 19, no 13, p. 2771-2781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energetic nutrients are oxidized to sustain high intracellular NADPH/NADP(+) ratios. NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) disulfide and glutathione disulfide by thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (Gsr), respectively, fuels antioxidant systems and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Mouse livers lacking both TrxR1 and Gsr sustain these essential activities using an NADPH-independent methionine-consuming pathway; however, it remains unclear how this reducing power is distributed. Here, we show that liver-specific co-disruption of the genes encoding Trx1, TrxR1, and Gsr (triplenull) causes dramatic hepatocyte hyperproliferation. Thus, even in the absence of Trx1, methionine-fueled glutathione production supports hepatocyte S phase deoxyribonucleotide production. Also, Trx1 in the absence of TrxR1 provides a survival advantage to cells under hyperglycemic stress, suggesting that glutathione, likely via glutaredoxins, can reduce Trx1 disulfide in vivo. In triple-null livers like in many cancers, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis places a critical yet relatively low-volume demand on these reductase systems, thereby favoring high hepatocyte turnover over sustained hepatocyte integrity.

  • 14.
    Sanchez, Gonzalo Manuel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Alkhori Franzén, Liza
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Hatano, Eduardo
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Schultz, Sebastian
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin.
    Jafari, Shadi
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Granseth, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Hedgehog Signaling Regulates the Ciliary Transport of Odorant Receptors in Drosophila2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 464-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is a key regulatory pathway during development and also has a functional role in mature neurons. Here, we show that Hh signaling regulates the odor response in adult Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We demonstrate that this is achieved by regulating odorant receptor (OR) transport to and within the primary cilium in OSN neurons. Regulation relies on ciliary localization of the Hh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo). We further demonstrate that the Hh- and Smo-dependent regulation of the kinesin-like protein Cos2 acts in parallel to the intraflagellar transport system (IFT) to localize ORs within the cilium compartment. These findings expand our knowledge of Hh signaling to encompass chemosensory modulation and receptor trafficking.

  • 15.
    Schwartz, Yuri B.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Pirrotta, Vincenzo
    Ruled by ubiquitylation: a new order for Polycomb recruitment2014In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 321-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb complexes are found in most cells, but they must be targeted to specific genes in specific cell types in order to regulate pluripotency and differentiation. The recruitment of Polycomb complexes to specific targets has been widely thought to occur in two steps: first, one complex, PRC2, produces histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) trimethylation at a specific gene, and then the PRC1 complex is recruited by its ability to bind to H3K27me3. Now, three new articles turn this model upside-down by showing that binding of a variant PRC1 complex and subsequent H2A ubiquitylation of surrounding chromatin is sufficient to trigger the recruitment of PRC2 and H3K27 trimethylation. These studies also show that ubiquitylated H2A is directly sensed by PRC2 and that ablation of PRC1-mediated H2A ubiquitylation impairs genome-wide PRC2 binding and disrupts mouse development.

  • 16. Siegrist, M. Sloan
    et al.
    Aditham, Arjun K.
    Espaillat, Akbar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Cameron, Todd A.
    Whiteside, Sarah A.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Portnoy, Daniel A.
    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.
    Host Actin Polymerization Tunes the Cell Division Cycle of an Intracellular Pathogen2015In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 499-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth and division are two of the most fundamental capabilities of a bacterial cell. While they are well described for model organisms growing in broth culture, very little is known about the cell division cycle of bacteria replicating in more complex environments. Using a D-alanine reporter strategy, we found that intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) spend a smaller proportion of their cell cycle dividing compared to Lm growing in broth culture. This alteration to the cell division cycle is independent of bacterial doubling time. Instead, polymerization of host-derived actin at the bacterial cell surface extends the non-dividing elongation period and compresses the division period. By decreasing the relative proportion of dividing Lm, actin polymerization biases the population toward cells with the highest propensity to form actin tails. Thus, there is a positive-feedback loop between the Lm cell division cycle and a physical interaction with the host cytoskeleton.

  • 17. Sola-Riera, Caries
    et al.
    Gupta, Shawon
    Maleki, Kimia T.
    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Patricia
    Saidi, Dale
    Zimmer, Christine L.
    Vangeti, Sindhu
    Rivino, Laura
    Leo, Yee-Sin
    Lye, David Chien
    MacAry, Paul A.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Smed-Sorensen, Anna
    Joseph, Bertrand
    Bjorkstrom, Niklas K.
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Klingstrom, Jonas
    Hantavirus Inhibits TRAIL-Mediated Killing of Infected Cells by Downregulating Death Receptor 52019In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2124-2139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes normally kill virus-infected cells by apoptosis induction. Cytotoxic granule-dependent apoptosis induction engages the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, whereas death receptor (DR)-dependent apoptosis triggers the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Hantaviruses, single-stranded RNA viruses of the order Bunyavirales, induce strong cytotoxic lymphocyte responses in infected humans. Cytotoxic lymphocytes, however, are largely incapable of eradicating hantavirus-infected cells. Here, we show that the prototypic hantavirus, Hantaan virus (HTNV), induces TRAIL production but strongly inhibits TRAIL-mediated extrinsic apoptosis induction in infected cells by downregulating DR5 cell surface expression. Mechanistic analyses revealed that HTNV triggers both 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of DR5 through direct ubiquitination of DR5 and hampers DR5 transport to the cell surface. These results corroborate earlier findings, demonstrating that hantavirus also inhibits cytotoxic cell granule-dependent apoptosis induction. Together, these findings show that HTNV counteracts intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis induction pathways, providing a defense mechanism utilized by hantaviruses to inhibit cytotoxic cell-mediated eradication of infected cells.

  • 18. Starosta, Agata L
    et al.
    Lassak, Jürgen
    Peil, Lauri
    Atkinson, Gemma C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu 50090, Estonia.
    Woolstenhulme, Christopher J.
    Virumäe, Kai
    Buskirk, Allen
    Tenson, Tanel
    Remme, Jaanus
    Jung, Kirsten
    Wilson, Daniel N.
    A conserved proline triplet in Val-tRNA synthetase and the origin of elongation factor P2014In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial ribosomes stall on polyproline stretches and require the elongation factor P (EF-P) to relieve the arrest. Yet it remains unclear why evolution has favored the development of EF-P rather than selecting against the occurrence of polyproline stretches in proteins. We have discovered that only a single polyproline stretch is invariant across all domains of life, namely a proline triplet in ValS, the tRNA synthetase, that charges tRNA(Val) with valine. Here, we show that expression of ValS in vivo and in vitro requires EF-P and demonstrate that the proline triplet located in the active site of ValS is important for efficient charging of tRNA(Val) with valine and preventing formation of mischarged Thr-tRNA(Val) as well as efficient growth of E. coli in vivo. We suggest that the critical role of the proline triplet for ValS activity may explain why bacterial cells coevolved the EF-P rescue system.

1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf