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  • 1.
    Fraser, Scott
    et al.
    DawnFresh Ltd..
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Chef perceptions of modernist equipment and techniques in the kitchen2018In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modernist techniques and equipment (MTE) have enabled chefs to create otherwise impossible dishes and achieve excellent levels of consistency and precision. This research aimed to map the diffusion of these techniques to the broader field of hospitality and the impact they had on the skills, identity, and creativity of chefs. An online survey of 87 Edinburgh (UK) chefs and interviews with 11 of these chefs informed the enquiry. It was found that MTE had been adopted by 64.4% of restaurant kitchens, not only in fine dining but also by casual restaurants and public houses. Chefs’ views of these techniques can be characterized as qualified acceptance and, in some cases, ambivalence. Some skills were thought to be lost, but it was felt that using these techniques reskilled rather than deskilled chefs. That said, there was some resistance to their introduction. However, they currently have a notable influence on Edinburgh chefs.

  • 2.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dining out: restaurants and British society in the 1930sIn: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    This article considers the social circumstances supporting wider restaurant use and the problems encountered as this became established in 1930s Britain. A documentary research approach was used to collect the perspectives of those who witnessed, at first hand, these changes in British society and food culture. The data comprise accounts in the contemporary literature and period newspaper reports. In the 1930s, significant social and economic changes supported a much broader demand for restaurants. New types of customer were attracted and many were exposed to a cuisine which bore little relationshi pto their meals at home. Unfamiliar dishes along with a menu language and service practices derived from the traditional élite food culture created social settings offering embarrassment for the unwary. Restaurant guides and dining advice were published for those wanting to dine with greater confidence and provide insight into social attitudes at the time.

  • 3.
    Sundqvist, Joachim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Walter, Ute
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Deriving Value from Customer Based Meal Experiences: Introducing a Postmodern Perspective on the Value Emergence from the Experience of the Commercial Meal2017In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 171-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory article examines the role of the meal experience in the context of the postmodern conditions of marketing as well as customer value emergence and suggests a novel perspective on the commercial meal experience as being customer based. It focuses on how value is idiosyncratically formed, for the customer, based on what the customer experiences. The article draws attention to the need of changing perspectives from the producer to the customer to gain understanding on how value emerges for the customer within the commercial meal experience. It also presents the need for a dynamic understanding of the meal experience and argues that the current paradigm of understanding the meal is lacking due to it being an a priori construct.

  • 4.
    Wellton, Lotte
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Walter, Ute
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Making meals in small seasonal restaurants2018In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since restaurateurs can benefit by analyzing the production of meals, particularly with the dominant framework for meal experiences, the five aspects meal model (FAMM), this study examined FAMM’s relevance as an analytical tool for understanding meal production via field observations and interviews in eight small restaurants in a rural destination in Sweden. Results showed that FAMM’s aspect of the management control system and the factor of time are critical to the entire meal production process in restaurants. This article closes with a discussion of FAMM’s usefulness as a qualitative checklist for restaurateurs.

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