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  • 1. McGoff, Elaine
    et al.
    Aroviita, Jukka
    Pilotto, Francesca
    Miler, Oliver
    Solimini, Angelo G.
    Porst, Gwendolin
    Jurca, Tamara
    Donohue, Louise
    Sandin, Leonard
    Assessing the relationship between the Lake Habitat Survey and littoral macroinvertebrate communities in European lakes2013In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 25, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) has drawn much attention to hydromorphological alterations of surface waters. The Lake Habitat Survey (LHS) protocol provides a method for characterising and assessing the physical habitats of lakes and reservoirs. Two metrics were developed based on this method: the Lake Habitat Modification Score (LHMS) and the Lake Habitat Quality Assessment (LHQA), as measures of lake modification and habitat value, respectively. However, the use of these metrics to predict measures of ecological quality remains largely untested. Thus, we assessed the relationships between LHS metrics and the littoral macroinvertebrate community in 42 lakes across Europe. A significant relationship was found between littoral macrophyte descriptors and riparian natural land cover variables of the LHQA score and macroinvertebrate community composition in 2 out of 4 European regions. No relationship was found between macroinvertebrate community composition and the LHMS. Some significant correlations were found between selected macroinvertebrate metrics and the LHS scores, but this pattern was not consistent across regions, and no relationship was found with the overall LHMS or LHQA scores. This demonstrates that the LHS metrics do not consistently predict the quality of littoral macroinvertebrate communities across Europe, and a region specific approach may be necessary. However, we could demonstrate a relationship between the site specific LHS variables and the macroinvertebrate community at the site level, and in some cases at the regional level. Therefore, although the LHS metrics do not appear to be a useful for relating habitat quality and pressure to littoral macroinvertebrate communities, selected LHS variables may exhibit stronger relationships with the biota.

  • 2. Miler, Oliver
    et al.
    Porst, Gwendolin
    McGoff, Elaine
    Pilotto, Francesca
    Donohue, Louise
    Jurca, Tamara
    Solimini, Angelo
    Sandin, Leonard
    Irvine, Kenneth
    Aroviita, Jukka
    Clarke, Ralph
    Pusch, Martin T.
    Morphological alterations of lake shores in Europe: A multimetric ecological assessment approach using benthic macroinvertebrates2013In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 34, p. 398-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Besides pollution, lakes are affected by human alterations of lake-shore morphology. However, ecological effects of such alterations have rarely been studied systematically. Hence, we developed tools to assess the ecological effects of anthropogenic morphological alterations on European lake-shores based on pressure-specific response patterns of littoral macroinvertebrate community composition. Littoral invertebrates were sampled from 51 lakes in seven European countries. Sampling covered a range of natural to heavily morphologically degraded sites including natural shorelines, recreational beaches, ripraps and retaining walls. Biological data were supplemented by standardized morphological data that were collected via a Lake Habitat Survey (LHS) protocol and subsequently used to develop a morphological stressor index. Two biotic multimetric indices were developed based on habitat-specific samples (Littoral Invertebrate Multimetric based on HAbitat samples, LIMHA) and composite samples (Littoral Invertebrate Multimetric based on COmposite samples, LIMCO) through correlations with the morphological stressor index. Similarity analyses showed strong spatial differences in macroinvertebrate community composition between four main geographical regions, i.e. Western, Northern, Central and Southern Europe. The morphological stressor index as well as LIMCO and LIMHA have been developed for each geographical region specifically, thereby optimizing correlations of LIMCO and LIMHA with the respective morphological stressor index. The metric composition of LIMCO and LIMHA and their correlation coefficients with the morphological stressor index are comparable to existing national and regional methods that assess morphological lakeshore degradation via macroinvertebrate communities. Hence, LIMCO and LIMHA indices constitute a new stressor-specific assessment tool that enables comparable lake morphology assessment across Europe, as it has been developed involving a uniform methodology followed by regionalized optimization. These tools fulfil the standards of the EU Water Framework Directive and thus may complement existing assessment approaches used in lake monitoring focusing solely on lake eutrophication so far.

  • 3. Pu, Xiao
    et al.
    Cheng, Hongguang
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Xie, Jing
    Lu, Lu
    Yang, Shengtian
    Occurrence of water phosphorus at the water-sediment interface of a freshwater shallow lake: Indications of lake chemistry2017In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 81, p. 443-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Better understanding of the occurrence of water phosphorus (P) at the water-sediment interface is vital to clarify P sources of origin in freshwater shallow lake ecosystems. This study focused on water-sediment interface systems and explored implicit indications of lake chemistry on water P based on a case study of Baiyangdian Lake, North China. 20 variables from 14 sampling sites collected for six months in two years were investigated, including sequentially extracted P fractions. Exploratory data analysis with multivariate statistical techniques and the index of P maximum solubilization potential were employed to examine interactions of water P and coexisting chemicals, and to accomplish pattern recognition of water-sediment interface systems. Results showed that nine key variables (temperature, conductivity, ammonium nitrogen, total nitrogen, sediment total P, metallic oxide bound P, organic P, aluminum and ferrum) were identified and ranked into four latent parameters (physical factors, nutrients, P species, and metals), accounting for 81% of water P variation. Accordingly, the recognized three patterns of water-sediment interface unraveled spatial partitioning for the domination of external or internal P sources. Four variables (temperature, sediment total P, metallic oxide bound P and organic P) were competent to classify patterns of water-sediment interface with 100% correct assignment of cases. Using two parameters (organic P and metallic oxide bound P), discriminant functions produced 85.7% correct assignations, indicating the importance of the two P species in explaining spatial heterogeneity of water P under oxic and alkaline circumstances. This study provides an operational zoning frame and implications for eutrophication management applicable to freshwater shallow lakes.

  • 4.
    Uboni, Alessia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Animal Nutrition and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blochel, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kodnik, Danijela
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Modelling occurrence and status of mat-forming lichens in boreal forests to assess the past and current quality of reindeer winter pastures2019In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 96, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichens play an essential role in northern ecosystems as important contributors to the water, nutrient and carbon cycles, as well as the main winter food resource for reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, also called caribou in North America), the most abundant herbivores in arctic and subarctic regions. Today, climate change and several types of land use are rapidly transforming northern ecosystems and challenging lichen growth. Since lichens are important indicators of ecosystem health and habitat suitability for reindeer, large-scale assessments are needed to estimate their past, present and future status. In our study, we aimed to develop models and equations that can be used by stakeholders to identify the occurrence of lichen-dominated boreal forests and to determine lichen conditions in those forests. Data were collected in Sweden and most input data are publicly available. We focused on mat-forming lichens belonging to the genera Cladonia and Cetraria, which are dominant species in the reindeer and caribou winter diet. Our models described lichen-dominated forests as being dominated by Scots pine (Pines sylvestris), having low basal area and thin canopy cover, and being located in south-and west-facing areas with high summer precipitation, low winter precipitation and temperature, and on gentle slopes. Within those forests, lichen biomass was positively related to tree canopy cover and summer precipitation, while negatively and exponentially related to intensity of use of the area by reindeer. Forest, meteorological, topographic and soil data can be used as input in our models to determine lichen conditions without having to estimate lichen biomass through demanding and expensive fieldwork.

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