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  • 1.
    Edo Gimenez, Mar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Energy Engineering, Department of Engineering Sciences & Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gao, Qiuju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Persson, Per-Erik
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fate of metals and emissions of organic pollutants from torrefaction of waste wood, MSW, and RDF2017In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 68, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Torrefaction of municipal solid waste (MSW), refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and demolition and construction wood (DC) was performed at 220°C and a residence time of 90 min in a bench-scale reactor. The levels of toxic polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF) contained in emission from the torrefaction process were evaluated. In addition, main ash-forming elements and trace metals in the raw feedstock and char were determined. The use of MSW in fuel blends with DC resulted in lower PCDD and PCDF emissions after torrefaction, compared with the RDF blends. The migration of chlorine from the feedstock to the gas phase reduces the chlorine content of the char which may reduce the risk of alkali chloride-corrosion in char combustion. However, trace metals catalytically active in the formation of PCDD and PCDF remain in the char, thereby may promote PCDD and PCDF formation during subsequent char combustion for energy recovery; this formation is less extensive than when the feedstock is used.

  • 2.
    Edo, Mar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Persson, Per-Erik
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Assessment of chemical and material contamination in waste wood fuels: a case study ranging over nine years2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 49, p. 311-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased demand for waste wood (WW) as fuel in Swedish co-combustion facilities during the last years has increased the import of this material. Each country has different laws governing the use of chemicals and therefore the composition of the fuel will likely change when combining WW from different origins. To cope with this, enhanced knowledge is needed on WW composition and the performance of pre-treatment techniques for reduction of its contaminants. In this study, the chemical and physical characteristics of 500 WW samples collected at a co-combustion facility in Sweden between 2004 and 2013 were investigated to determine the variation of contaminant content over time. Multivariate data analysis was used for the interpretation of the data. The concentrations of all the studied contaminants varied widely between sampling occasions, demonstrating the highly variable composition of WW fuels. The efficiency of sieving as a pre-treatment measure to reduce the levels of contaminants was not sufficient, revealing that sieving should be used in combination with other pre-treatment methods. The results from this case study provide knowledge on waste wood composition that may benefit its management. This knowledge can be applied for selection of the most suitable pre-treatments to obtain high quality sustainable WW fuels.

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  • 3.
    Hedman, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Burvall, Jan
    Nilsson, Calle
    Marklund, Stellan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste2005In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 311-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140–180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations.

  • 4.
    Hedman, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Burvall, Jan
    Nilsson, Calle
    Marklund, Stellan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    PCDD/F in source-sorted waste fractions and emissions from their co-combustion with reed canary-grass2007In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1580-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste, including material that would otherwise be recycled, was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.), and combusted as briquettes in 150 and 600 kW biofuel-boilers without advanced cleaning systems. The source-sorted waste was further sorted and characterized according to its material and chemical contents. The bulk of the waste’s chlorine content came from the non-package plastic fraction, whereas 90–95% of ∑PCDD/F (74–90% of WHO-TEQ) originated from the textile fraction. The sources of the dioxins in the waste fractions are discussed. The balance of dioxin levels was negative, i.e., the amounts of dioxins output in the flue gas were lower than those input in the fuel, except when there were operational disturbances in the combustion. In one of the combustion trials the total levels of dioxins in the flue-gas and ashes were also lower than the input levels. The use of additional cleaning equipment will be needed to ensure that emissions of dioxins and hydrochloric acid will be below legal limits.

  • 5.
    Redin, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Niinipuu, Mirva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Occurrence of brominated diphenyl ethers, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in foam materials in scrapped car seats from 1985 to 20122017In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 61, p. 300-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) and dibenzofurans (PBDFs) in polyurethane foam (PUF) from car seats of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and compare the concentrations of PBDEs with the stipulated regulations in the POP Directive. The method comprised screening by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and GG-MS analysis. Of 59 tested samples from ELVs, 17 samples showed lines above limit of detection (LOD) levels when screening by XRF. Those samples were selected as replicates and for further analysis by GC-MS. The majority of the studied samples showed low or non-detectable concentrations of PBDEs and PBDD/Fs, but two samples showed concentrations of Σ Te-HpBDEs close to the regulated level for Te-HpBDEs in waste (1000 mg kg−1); one was slightly higher (1390 mg kg−1) and the other slightly lower (570 mg kg−1). It was concluded that brominated pollutants such as Te-HpBDEs occur in low levels in automotive applications in scrapped cars produced in years when brominated flame retardants were used. However, two of the 59 samples tested showed levels close to those stipulated by regulations concerning POPs in waste.

  • 6.
    Weidemann, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Allegrini, E.
    Fruergaard Astrup, T.
    Hulgaard, T.
    Riber, C.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Size fractionation of waste-to-energy boiler ash enables separation of a coarse fraction with low dioxin concentrations2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 49, p. 110-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) formed in modern Waste-to-Energy plants are primarily found in the generated ashes and air pollution control residues, which are usually disposed of as hazardous waste. The objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of PCDD/F in different grain size fractions in the boiler ash, i.e. ash originating from the convection pass of the boiler. If a correlation between particle size and dioxin concentrations could be found, size fractionation of the ashes could reduce the total amount of hazardous waste. Boiler ash samples from ten sections of a boiler's convective part were collected over three sampling days, sieved into three different size fractions - <0.09 mm, 0.09-0.355 mm, and >0.355 mm - and analysed for PCDD/F. The coarse fraction (>0.355 mm) in the first sections of the horizontal convection pass appeared to be of low toxicity with respect to dioxin content. While the total mass of the coarse fraction in this boiler was relatively small, sieving could reduce the amount of ash containing toxic PCDD/F by around 0.5 kg per tonne input waste or around 15% of the collected boiler ash from the convection pass. The mid-size fraction in this study covered a wide size range (0.09-0.355 mm) and possibly a low toxicity fraction could be identified by splitting this fraction into more narrow size ranges. The ashes exhibited uniform PCDD/F homologue patterns which suggests a stable and continuous generation of PCDD/F.

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