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  • 1.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Practical aspects on the estimation of the parameters in Coale's model for marital fertility1985In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 22, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Madhavan, Sangeetha
    et al.
    Schatz, Enid
    Clark, Samuel
    Collinson, Mark
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Child mobility, maternal status, and household composition in rural South Africa2012In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 699-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the influence of maternal status, socioeconomic status of the household, and household composition on the mobility of children aged 0-14 in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa, from 1999 to 2008. Using data from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System, we found that children whose mothers were temporary migrants, living elsewhere, or dead had higher odds of moving than children whose mothers were coresident. Older children and children living in richer households faced lower odds of mobility. For children whose mothers were coresident, there was no effect of maternal substitutes on child mobility. However, among children whose mothers were temporary migrants or living elsewhere, the presence of prime-aged and elderly females lowered the odds of mobility. For maternal orphans, the presence of elderly women in the household lowered their odds of mobility. The results underscore the importance of examining the conditions under which children move in order to strengthen service delivery targeted at safeguarding children's well-being.

  • 3. Reher, David Sven
    et al.
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Sanz-Gimeno, Alberto
    van Poppel, Frans W. A.
    Agency in Fertility Decisions in Western Europe During the Demographic Transition: A Comparative Perspective2017In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 3-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a set of linked reproductive histories taken from Sweden, the Netherlands, and Spain for the period 1871–1960 to address key issues regarding how reproductive change was linked specifically to mortality and survivorship and more generally to individual agency. Using event-history analysis, this study investigates how the propensity to have additional children was influenced by the number of surviving offspring when reproductive decisions were made. The results suggest that couples were continuously regulating their fertility to achieve reproductive goals. Families experiencing child fatalities show significant increases in the hazard of additional births. In addition, the sex composition of the surviving sibset also appears to have influenced reproductive decisions in a significant but changing way. The findings offer strong proof of active decision-making during the demographic transition and provide an important contribution to the literature on the role of mortality for reproductive change.

  • 4.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Tammaru, Tiit
    University of Tartu, Department of Geography.
    Danzer, Alexander M.
    University of Munich (LMU), Department of Economics.
    van Ham, Maarten
    Delft University of Technology, OTB Research Institute for the Built Environment.
    Marcińczak, Szymon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Stjernström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Factors shaping workplace segregation between natives and immigrants2014In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 645-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on segregation of immigrant groups is increasingly turning its attention from residential areas toward other important places, such as the workplace, where immigrants can meet and interact with members of the native population. This article examines workplace segregation of immigrants. We use longitudinal, georeferenced Swedish population register data, which enables us to observe all immigrants in Sweden for the period 1990–2005 on an annual basis. We compare estimates from ordinary least squares with fixed-effects regressions to quantify the extent of immigrants' self-selection into specific workplaces, neighborhoods, and partnerships, which may bias more naïve ordinary least squares results. In line with previous research, we find lower levels of workplace segregation than residential segregation. The main finding is that low levels of residential segregation reduce workplace segregation, even after we take into account intermarriage with natives as well as unobserved characteristics of immigrants such as willingness and ability to integrate into the host society. Being intermarried with a native reduces workplace segregation for immigrant men but not for immigrant women.

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