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  • 1.
    Borggren, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Knowledge flows in high-impact firms: how does relatedness influence survival, acquisition and exit?2016In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 637-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the impact on regional renewal and employment ascribed to rapidly growing firms (high-impactfirms, HIFs), this paper argues that little is still known in economic geography and business studies todayregarding the mechanisms influencing growth of such firms and, hence, the potential impact on regionalemployment. The aim of this paper is thus to explore how the qualitative content of skills (i.e. the degree ofsimilarity, relatedness and unrelatedness) recruited to a firm during a period of fast growth influences itsfuture success. Our findings, based on a sample of 1,589 HIFs in the Swedish economy, suggest that it is notonly the number of people employed that matters in aiding the understanding of the future destiny of the firms– but also, more importantly, it is the scope of the skills recruited and their proximity to related industries.

  • 2.
    Boschma, Ron
    et al.
    Department of Economic Geography, Utrecht University, NL-3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    How does labour mobility affect the performance of plants?: The importance of relatedness and geographical proximity2009In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 169-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the impact of skill portfolios and labour mobility on plantperformance by means of a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to features of plants for the whole Swedish economy. We found that a portfolio of related competences at the plant level increases significantly productivity growth of plants, in contrast to plant portfolios consisting of either similar or unrelated competences. Based on the analysis of 101,093 job moves, we found that inflows of skills that are related to the existing knowledge base of the plant had a positive effect on plant performance, while the inflow of new employees with skills that are already present in the plant had a negative impact. Our analyses also show that geographical proximityinfluences the effect of different skill inflows. Inflows of unrelated skills only contribute positively to plant performance when these are recruited in the same region. Labour mobility across regions only has a positive effect on productivity growth of plants when this concerns new employees with related skills.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Localized mobility clusters: Impacts of labour market externalities on firm performance2009In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the impact of labour market-induced externalities on firm performance by using a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to workplaces for the entire Swedish economy. Based on the analysis of 256,985 workplaces, our results show that firms belonging to networks of local job mobility (i.e. ‘localized mobility clusters’) significantly outperform other similar firms within the local labour market. The results also indicate that concentrations of similar and related firms do not explain any considerable part of the variations in firm competitiveness. Labour market externalitiesderived via local job mobility produce significantly more powerful effects for the involved firms as compared to the degree of co-location, diversity and scale.

  • 4.
    Lengyel, Balazs
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Hungarian Academy of Sciences ; International Business School Budapest ; .
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Co-worker networks, labour mobility, and productivity growth in regions2017In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 17, p. 635-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobility of workers is an important source of regional dynamics, but the effect of mobility on regional productivity growth is not straightforward, as some firms tend to win while others lose from mobility. In the present paper, we argue that the co-worker networks across plants that are established by labour moves are important for both local learning opportunities and job matching quality and should hence facilitate regional growth. We therefore propose a new homophily-biased perspective on co-worker network creation and show that it suits geographical analyses better than random networks do. Moreover, panel vector autoregression (pVAR) models provide systematic evidence that an increase in co-worker network density is positively related to regional productivity growth. This is found to be important even when only ties across plants that are not directly linked by labour mobility are included.

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