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  • 1.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Warsaw School of Economics.
    Barclay, Kieron
    Kolk, Martin
    The effect of number of siblings on adult mortality: evidence from Swedish registers for cohorts born between 1938 and 19722017In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 43-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic research has paid much attention to the impact of childhood conditions on adult mortality. We focus on one of the key aspects of early life conditions, sibling group size, and examine the causal effect of growing up in a large family on mortality. While previous studies have focused on low- or middle-income countries, we examine whether growing up in a large family is a disadvantage in Sweden, a context where most parents have adequate resources, which are complemented by a generous welfare state. We used Swedish register data and frailty models, examining all-cause and cause-specific mortality between the ages of 40 and 74 for the 1938–72 cohorts, and also a quasi-experimental approach that exploited multiple births as a source of exogenous variation in the number of siblings. Overall our results do not indicate that growing up in a large family has a detrimental effect on longevity in Sweden.

  • 2.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Rogers, John
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    High risk families: The unequal distribution of infant mortality in nineteenth century Sweden2005In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kulu, Hill
    et al.
    University of St Andrews.
    Lundholm, Emma
    Umeå University.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University.
    Is spatial mobility on the rise or in decline?: An order-specific analysis of the migration of young adults in Sweden2018In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 323-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate spatial mobility over time. Research on 'new mobilities' suggests increasing movement of individuals, technology, and information. By contrast, studies of internal migration report declining spatial mobility in recent decades. Using longitudinal register data from Sweden, we calculate annual order-specific migration rates to investigate the spatial mobility of young adults over the last three decades. We standardize mobility rates for educational enrolment, educational level, family status, and place of residence to determine how much changes in individuals' life domains explain changes in mobility. Young adults' migration rates increased significantly in the 1990s; although all order-specific migration rates increased, first migration rates increased the most. Changes in population composition, particularly increased enrolment in higher education, accounted for much of the elevated spatial mobility in the 1990s. The analysis supports neither ever increasing mobility nor a long-term rise in rootedness among young adults in Sweden.

  • 4.
    Sandström, Glenn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Sex preference for children in German villages during the fertility transition2015In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past, parents' sex preferences for their children have proved difficult to verify. This study used John Knodel's German village genealogies of couples married between 1815 and 1899 to investigate sex preferences for children during the fertility transition. Event history analyses of couples' propensity to progress to a fifth parity was used to test whether the probability of having additional children was influenced by the sex composition of surviving children. It appears that son preference influenced reproductive behaviour: couples having only girls experienced significantly higher transition rates than those having only boys or a mixed sibset. However, couples who married after about 1870 began to exhibit fertility behaviour consistent with the choice to have at least one surviving boy and girl. This result represents a surprisingly early move towards the symmetrical sex preference typical of modern European populations.

  • 5. Van Bavel, Jan
    et al.
    Klesment, Martin
    Beaujouan, Eva
    Brzozowska, Zuzanna
    Puur, Allan
    Reher, David
    Requena, Miguel
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sobotka, Tomáš
    Zeman, Kryštof
    Seeding the gender revolution: Women’s education and cohort fertility among the baby boom generations2018In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 283-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe and the United States, women’s educational attainment started to increase around the middle of the twentieth century. The expected implication was fertility decline and postponement, whereas in fact the opposite occurred. We analyse trends in the quantum of cohort fertility among the baby boom generations in 15 countries and how these relate to women’s education. Over the 1901–45 cohorts, the proportion of parents with exactly two children rose steadily and homogeneity in family sizes increased. Progression to a third child and beyond declined in all the countries, continuing the ongoing trends of the fertility transition. In countries with a baby boom, and especially among women with post-primary education, this was compensated for by decreasing childlessness and increasing progression to a second child. These changes, linked to earlier stages of the fertility transition, laid the foundations for later fertility patterns associated with the gender revolution.

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