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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Brännäs, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Household work travel time1996In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 541-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study derives and estimates models for the work travel time of each spouse in the household conditional on both spouses' hours of work. The model is estimated using Swedish household data. The own labour supply has a positive impact on travel time for females and a negative one for males. The estimated effects of the other spouse's labour supply are insignificant. An overall test of whether the hours of work are weakly separable from work travel time indicates that this hypothesis cannot be rejected for males but can be rejected for females.

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Wikström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Regional income growth and net migration in Sweden, 1970-19952001In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 823-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns the regional growth pattern in Sweden, and the purpose is to analyse what factors determine the growth rate of average income and the net migration at the regional level. We find a negative relationship between the initial level of regional average income and subsequent income growth. The results also imply that the initial endowment of human capital (measured as the percentage of the population with higher education) has a positive effect on the subsequent net migration. Other determinants of regional income growth and population movements are 'fixed endowments' (related to geography and climate) and regional labour market characteristics.

  • 3.
    Berck, Peter
    et al.
    University of California, Berkeley.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Regional sorting of human capital: the choice of location among young adults in Sweden2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 757-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration rates are highest among young adults, especially students, and their location choices affect the regional distribution of human capital, growth and local public sector budgets. Using Swedish register data on young adults, the choice of whether to enroll in education and the choice of location are estimated jointly. The results indicate a systematic selection into investment in further education based on school grades and associated preferences for locations with higher per capita tax bases. For students, the estimates indicate lower preferences for locations with higher shares of older people.  The importance of family networks for the choice of location is confirmed.    

  • 4.
    Boschma, Ron
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University / Utrecht University.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Labour market externalities and regional growth in Sweden: the importance of labour mobility between skill-related industries2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1669-1690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between labour market externalities and regional growth based on real labour flows. In particular, we test for the importance of labour mobility across so-called skill-related industries. We make use of a sophisticated indicator that measures the degree of skill-relatedness between all industries, and we employ actual labour flows between 435 4-digit industries within 72 Swedish functional labour market regions to estimate how labour market externalities are related to regional growth in the period 1998-2002. Both our fixed effect models and GMM-estimates demonstrate that a strong intensity of intra-regional labour flows between skill-related industries impacts positively on regional productivity growth, but less so on regional employment growth. Labour mobility between unrelated industries tends to dampen regional unemployment growth while a high degree of intra-industry labour flows is only found to be associated with rising regional unemployment.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Work–life advantage: Sustaining regional learning and innovation2018In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1306-1307Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Hansen, Høgni Kalsø
    Department of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    The importance of business climate and people climate on regional performance2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1135-1155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creativity and talent are considered key-factors in regional development due to the connection between growth, city regions and human capital. To come to a deeper understanding on the relevance of recent amenity-driven theories and how they are related to employment and GRP at regional level, this paper analyses the influence of business-climate (business friendly assets) and people-climate (amenities). Based on panel-data regressions, we show that both business- and people-climate is related to regional performance. The exact nature of these relationships is however dependent on how both regional performance and business- or people climate is defined.

  • 7.
    Hanes, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Spatial spillover effects in the Swedish local rescue services2002In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 531-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies what factors determine the expenditures on rescue services by municipalities in Sweden. The main purpose is to identify spatial spillover effects between municipalities in order to analyse strategic behaviour. The analysis is based on a joint product model, where collective security is assumed to contain local and regional public good elements. In the empirical analysis we find that the reaction functions are negatively sloped, meaning that we cannot reject the hypothesis of free riding behaviour. It is also found that rescue services can be considered a normal good and that the municipalities respond positively to security policy threats. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 8.
    Hanes, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Wikström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Does the local government structure affect population and income growth?: An empirical study of the 1952 municipal reform in Sweden2008In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 593-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of the paper is to analyse if the Swedish municipal reform in 1952 affected subsequent income growth and population movements. The empirical analysis is conducted using data for the period 1953 to 1959. The main result is that the municipal amalgamations had no effect on the municipal income growth patterns. However, a positive effect on population growth is found for the municipalities that were small in size prior to the reform. It is also found that the composition of the municipalities formed affected subsequent growth.

  • 9.
    Hane-Weijman, Emelie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Eriksson, Rikard H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Henning, Martin
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Returning to work: regional determinants of re-employment after major redundancies2018In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 768-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using matched employer-employee data on roughly 429,000 workers made redundant from large plant closures or major downsizing in Sweden between 1990-2005, this paper analyses the role of the regional industry mix (specialization, related and unrelated variety) in the likelihood of returning to work. Our results show that a high presence of same or related industries speeds up the re-employment process, while high concentrations of unrelated activities do not. The role of related activities is particularly evident in the short run and in regions with high unemployment. Consequently, the prospect of successful diversification is enhanced in regions with related industries.

  • 10.
    Hedlund, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Mapping the Socioeconomic Landscape of Rural Sweden: Towards a Typology of Rural Areas2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 460-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Definitions of the rural have been the subject of numerous academic papers. This paper argues that the a priori urban–rural continuum model should be abandoned in favour of a more open approach. In advancing this argument, a socioeconomic typology of rural Sweden is developed by means of cluster analysis. A total of 3983 areas were sorted into five clusters and16 sub-clusters. One-third of the rural population lives in the middle-class countryside within the urban shadow (12%) and working-class countryside within the urban shadow (22%); the bulk of the rural population lives in countryside outside the urban shadow (25%) and manufacturing periphery (28%); and a smaller share resides in the resource periphery (12%). It is concluded that location-specific typologies based on high-resolution data that avoid a priori assumptions of rurality give great insight into rural heterogeneity.

  • 11.
    Lindbergh, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Business Administration.
    Larsson, Claes-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Cost Control and Revenue Generation: The Case of Public Housing Companies Experiences in Sweden2004In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 803-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased competition for funds associated with the provision of public-sector housing, stock privatization, and attempts to introduce more tenant-centred and effective housing management services are trends seen in social housing throughout the European Union. Consequently, studies have been done that compare programmes worldwide and in Europe, or analyse changes in single countries. The Swedish system has received attention because of its long-term viability. An ordinary least-squares analysis of financial information from providers in this system has been made with special regard to revenue generation capabilities, the ability to remain profitable, and the retention of asset values for both level and first difference approaches. If one general lesson can be drawn from the empirical results, it would be that expenditures on consolidated maintenance are associated not only with short- term rental revenues, but also undoubtedly with long-term viability. Further, first difference results suggested that negotiated rents produced operating profits that kept pace with revenues over that period of the study. The results should be especially relevant to the interests of a wide range of local governments where public housing is of concern. In particular, those individuals bearing greater responsibility for running self-sufficient systems and also policy-makers interested in running efficient, effective systems should be interested in these observations.

  • 12.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    A Spatial Interaction Model of Benefit Spillovers from Locally Provided Public Services2006In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 631-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tests the hypotheses that recreational and cultural services provided at the local government level in Sweden are

    associated with spillovers between municipalities. A representative voter model is derived and the demand for recreational and cultural services is estimated using spatial SUR techniques. The result suggests a negative correlation between recreational and cultural services provided by neighbouring municipalities that indicate that these services are associated with spillovers. In terms of strategic behaviour, this result suggests that these services are strategic substitutes. Moreover, the results provide week evidence that recreational and cultural services provided by local governments are complements.

  • 13.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Does academic research affect local growth? Empirical evidence based on Swedish data2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 586-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Does academic research affect local growth? Empirical evidence based on Swedish data, Regional Studies. The hypothesis that research activities do not merely affect the growth rate within the municipality hosting the university or university college but spill over to neighbouring municipalities is tested using data covering the Swedish municipalities between 1990 and 2010. Research activities are measured as the number of dissertations and the number of papers published in academic journals with peer-review system. The results suggest academic institutions by their presence and 'production' of human capital and new knowledge through research affect the regional growth pattern in both the municipality where the academic institution is located and the growth pattern of neighbouring municipalities.

  • 14.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Using Spatial Econometrics to Analyze Local Growth in Sweden2006In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 303-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates factors that determine the average income growth and net migration rates in Swedish municipalities during 1981-99. The main issue is to test the hypothesis that conditional on a set of other possible determinants of regional growth, the growth rate in one municipality is affected by the growth rates in its neighbouring municipalities. The hypothesis of conditional convergence is also tested. A positive correlation is found between net migration rates in neighbouring municipalities, which suggests that net migration tends to 'spillover' to neighbouring municipalities. When it comes to average income growth, the results indicate spatial dependence in the error terms during the 1980s. However, there is no clear evidence in favour of the hypothesis of conditional convergence. Instead, the results predict conditional divergence between municipalities located in the Stockholm region throughout the period and also for municipalities outside the Stockholm region during the 1990s.

  • 15.
    Lundholm, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Interregional migration propensity and labour market size in Sweden, 1970-20012010In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 44, p. 455-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tendency in several European countries toward an increase in commuting has sometimes been presented as one possible explanation for why interregional migration propensity has decreased. This study is an attempt to investigate the impact of job availability on migration propensity over time. Other studies have shown that the size of the labour market has an effect on migration propensity. The same effect was found in this study. However, no evidence was found that job availability has become more influential on migration over time. The process of extended commuting has thus not made commuting opportunities more important as explanatory factor for interregional migration.

  • 16.
    Westerlund, Olle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Wyzan, Michael
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Household migration and the local public sector: evidence from Sweden, 1981-19841995In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 145-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the relationship between public sector attributes and household characteristics, and Swedish household migration, 1981-4, is studied. We report results separately for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas because the per capita levels of the tax base and intergovernmental grants are theoretically important migration determinants where population is sparse, whilst the tax rate may be more important where population is dense. Because fiscal influences are likely to be stronger for short-distance migration, we apply multinomial logit to a three-way choice set: staying and migrating short and long distances. Empirical results support our fiscal hypotheses and are consistent with previous findings on household characteristics.

  • 17.
    Östbye, Stein
    et al.
    University of Tromsö.
    Moilanen, Mikko
    University of Tromsö.
    Tervo, Hannu
    University of Jyväskylä .
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. CEDAR.
    The creative class: do jobs follow people or do people follow jobs?2018In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 745-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional adjustment models are applied to explore causal interaction between two types of people distinguished by educational attainment, and two types of jobs, creative class jobs and other jobs. Data used are for labour market regions in Finland, Norway and Sweden from the 2000s. Creative class jobs follow people with high educational attainment (oneway causation), but creative class jobs also follow main jobs and vice versa (circular causation). The results suggest that stimulating creative class job growth could be accomplished through attracting people with higher education, but also through attracting main sector business with the added benefit that the initial stimulus would be reinforced through circular and cumulative causation between job creation in the two sectors.

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