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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Hane-Weijman, Emelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Henning, Martin
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Sectoral and geographical mobility of workers after large establishment cutbacks or closures2018In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1071-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies redundant workers’ industrial and geographical mobility, and the consequences of post-redundancy mobility for regional policy strategies. This is accomplished by means of a database covering all workers who became redundant in major shutdowns or cutbacks in Sweden between 1990 and 2005. Frequencies of industrial and geographical mobility are described over time, and the influence of some important characteristics that make workers more likely to be subject to particular forms of mobilities are assessed. We find that re-employment rates vary extensively across industries and time. Whereas going back to the same or related industries is the most common re-employment strategy among workers who find a new job in the first year, workers who do not benefit from quick re-employment are increasingly squeezed out to new job fields and regions. Older workers and workers with high vested interest in their original industries usually employ a “same-industry/same-region” strategy. This most frequent, and perhaps often most attractive, same-industry strategy comes at a cost, however. Individuals who instead pursue other mobility strategies have a lower risk of suffering from another major redundancy in the future. Thus, in terms of regional policy, strategies promoting diversification to related industries after major redundancies seem to be much more important than trying to retain workers in their old industry. In this case the route via education (university or vocational training) is important, as it increases the likelihood of successfully changing industry at time of re-employment. 

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Hansen, Høgni Kalsø
    Department of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen.
    Industries, skills and human capital: how does regional size affect uneven development?2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 593-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses how the composition of industry structures, skills and human capital is related to regional development in peripheral and central locations. We do this by means of OLS models to analyse the relationship between purchase power growth and employment growth between 2001 and 2008 as well as a selection of variables constructed via register data of the total population in Sweden. The analysis demonstrates an evident spatial division of post-industrial development that larger regions benefit relatively more from than smaller regions do. The empirical findings indicate that a transition towards more knowledge intensive sectors and a higher educated labour force has the strongest impact on development in the largest Swedish regions, while a transition from manual skills towards more creative skills shows only a positive relationship with development in medium size regions. Consequently, the paper argues that the recent appraisal of the knowledge based economy mainly benefits the largest urban regions, meaning that regional size is an important parameter when discussing trajectories of regional development and the adaption to contemporary economic development paths.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Agglomeration mobility: Effects of localisation, urbanisation, and scale on job changes2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, p. 2419-2434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following increased attention being paid to the importance of labour-market processes in relation to knowledge diffusion and learning, this study addresses the influence of agglomeration economies (localisation, urbanisation, and scale) on the propensity to change jobs between and within local labour markets. From the use of longitudinal individual data (1990 ^ 2002), controlling for factors such as age, sex, income, and social relations, the results show that the composition of regional economies influences labour-market dynamism. We identify two cases of intraregional agglomeration mobility, that is, positive effects on job mobility, due to the concentration of similar activities (localisation economies) and the size of the labour market (urbanisation economies). The results also show that localisation economies compensate for regional structural disadvantages connected to small population numbers, as localisation effects in small regions have a significantlypositive effect on intraregional job-mobility rates, even compared with localisation effects in large and diversified metropolitan areas. The results indicate that the concentration of similar activities may be useful for small regions, if high levels of job mobility are crucial for the transfer of knowledge and the performance of firms.

  • 4.
    Mulder, Clara
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Local Ties and Family Migration2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 2195-2211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The migration of couples and families has thus far been approached mainly from human-capital and gender perspectives. In this article, we investigate how the male and female partner’s local ties influence the likelihood of family migration. Our hypotheses are that local ties to work and family strongly decrease the likelihood of migrating; that, given the dominating gender structures, ties to the man’s work are more influential than ties to the woman’s work; and that ties to the woman’s family are more influential than ties to the man’s family. We use data from the ASTRID micro database for Sweden, based on administrative information about the entire Swedish population. Logistic regression analysis was applied to moves that exceeded a distance of 50 kilometers for two-gender couples who did not separate in the period December 2004-December 2005. With regard to the likelihood of migrating, we find marked negative associations in the following: working close to home, the presence of parents and siblings nearby, and whether someone lives near the place of birth. The man’s ties to work seem to be more important to the likelihood of migrating than the woman’s, but we find hardly any gender differences in the impact of ties to family.

  • 5.
    Mulder, Clara
    et al.
    Royal University of Groningen.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Moving related to separation: who moves and to what distance2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 2589-2607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the issue of moving from the joint home on the occasion of separation. Our research question is: To what extent can the occurrence of moves related to separation, and the distance moved, be explained by ties to the location, resources, and other factors influencing the likelihood of moving of persons who separate and their ex-partners? We use data from the unique ASTRID micro database for Sweden, based on administrative information about the entire Swedish population. The methods are logistic regression analysis of moving, and OLS regression of the log-distance moved, for people from two-gender couples who separated during the period 2004 ^ 05. We find marked negative effects of local ties to parents and siblings, work, and the location in general on moving and moving distance. The results concerning resources and other factors influencing moving were less pronounced. Particularly striking was the absence of an effect of education level.

  • 6. Petrova, Sashka
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Södertörn University, SE-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Bouzarovski, Stefan
    Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the micro-geographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1240-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing recognition of the importance of indoor environments as 'active political-ecological spaces' has rarely been followed up by a systematic empirical engagement with the constituent dynamics and conceptual issues associated with infrastructural deprivation in this domain, particularly in non-Western contexts. Therefore, we investigate the relationship between self-reported perceptions of thermal comfort in the home, on the one hand, and a range of sociodemographic, housing, and health-related variables, on the other, via a quantitative analysis of a large-scale survey undertaken in the Eastern Ukrainian town of Stakhanov. Using the perceived level of thermal comfort as a starting point for its empirical explorations, we estimate the number and type of households who feel that they are receiving inadequate energy services in the home. Special attention is paid to the role of buildings in shaping the perceptions of thermal comfort.

  • 7.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    A simplified model of spatiotemporal population dynamics.1985In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an extension of the model of population growth and migration originally developed by H. Hotelling in 1921. This model consists of two ingredients, a logistic growth function and a linear spatial diffusion term. The author notes that the saturation population can be affected by the development of new technology and that improvements in transportation have increased the possibilities for migration. "Basic nonlinearities are introduced by use of a production technology with increasing-decreasing returns to scale. It is demonstrated how industrial takeoffs, population transitions, and agglomerative spatial patterns can emerge by changing the model parameters.

  • 8.
    Puu, Tönu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hotelling's migration model revisited1991In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1209-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present article Hotelling's model of population growth and migration of 1921 is 'revisited'. After a discussion of the stationary solutions and their stability the main point is made. The model itself is structurally unstable, but can be easily stabilized by adding a simple autonomous migration component. By this, the solution curves, in the shape of constant amplitude population waves over space for the original model, either become damped in one direction and explosive in another or are replaced by just one single spatial limit cycle.

  • 9.
    Sandow, Erika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Finland.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Is your commute killing you?: On the mortality risks of long-distance commuting2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1496-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general belief that expanding labour-market regions, triggered by increased commuting, have positive economic effects on individuals, firms, and society. Recently, however, scholars have reported possible negative outcomes related to health and well-being. Based on these findings, this study addresses the association between long-distance commuting, and mortality. Using longitudinal individual data from between 1985 and 2008, focusing on 55-year-olds in 1994, we model mortality through propensity score matching and Kaplan–Meyer estimates of survival among long-distance commuters and matched controls from the population travelling short distances to work. The results indicate that women who have experienced long-distance commuting face a significantly higher mortality risk compared with women with short commutes to work. This seems to be driven by variations in income and education: for example, for women with long-distance commuting experience, substantially lower survival rates are found among those with low education and low income. A very different picture emerges for men, for whom mortality risks do not seem to be associated with long-distance commuting. Our findings suggest that men and women are subject to different mechanisms regarding the nexus between commuting and mortality.

  • 10.
    Tammaru, Tiit
    et al.
    University of Tartu.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Stjernström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Learning through contact?: The effects on earnings of immigrant exposure to the native population2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2938-2955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors influencing immigrant labour-market outcomes have received increased scholarly attention lately. A recent research focus has been the effects of residential setting on labour market outcomes. This study brings a new dimension to this emerging body of research, introducing the role played by workplace composition, in addition to place of residence, in immigrant earnings. Based on Swedish longitudinal register data, OLS regression is used to examine effects of previous exposure to natives on earnings in three immigrant cohorts (1990, 1995 and 2000) five years after arrival. Besides controlling for individual characteristics and various labour-market attributes, a two-step Heckman correction procedure is applied to take into account the selectivity of entering the Swedish labour market. The main finding of the study is that exposure to the native population at the workplace is more important than residential exposure for predicting immigrant earnings.

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