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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Viktor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Swedish Center for Digital Innovation.
    Foka, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Digital gender: perspective, phenomena, practice2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research on gender online has made important land gains but under-theorizes the Internet as a passive, fixed, and somewhat insubstantial space or context. By contrast, this special issue draws on new material thinking to put into questions the very notion of “cyberspace” as a distinct realm. In this vein, the contents of this issue critically examine how the Internet and related digital technologies actively “work” to maintain or transform systems of oppression, as displayed, for example, in the digital doing(s) of gender. They also show how digital technologies and related concepts can be used to challenge current understandings of race, class, and gender and to produce and provoke new forms of knowledge. While the contents of this issue are drawn from different fields and display great diversity, the individual contributions of each author helps to chart out three potent venues for future Internet research: namely digital gender as perspective, phenomena, and practice.

  • 2.
    Dahlberg-Grundberg, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lundström, Ragnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Social Media and the Transnationalization of Mass Activism: Twitter and the labour movement2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the labour movement organization LabourStart, a digital initiative that, by various means such as e-mail campaigns and social media use, seeks to promote workers’ rights and to strengthen the labour movement on a global scale. The main aim of this study is to analyse a) how LabourStart employs Twitter for communication and organisation and b) how the Twitter-sphere that LabourStart constitutes — and is constituted by — is geographically structured. Our dataset consisted of all tweets containing the word “labourstart” and all tweets coming from or addressing any LabourStart–related account during the period 2008–2015. As theoretical points of departure, the notions of transnationalization/translocalism were used, in part together with the concept of connective action, to conceptualise the research. In terms of methodology, network analysis was the main approach employed to obtain and visualise the findings. Our results indicate that LabourStart’s Twitter use does not seem to have had any effects in terms of creating a decentralised transnational movement with translocal traits, thus suggesting that LabourStart has failed to fully make use of the connective features of Twitter and to establish a decentralized, transnational union movement. This, we suggest, is to some extent caused by LabourStart’s centralized organizational — and thus communicational — structure. In the concluding section, we interpret our findings in broader terms relating to the context and history of labour movements, and we discuss LabourStart’s work in relation to local and global worker issues.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Close Reading Big Data: The Echo Nest and the Production of (Rotten) Music Metadata2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital music distribution is increasingly powered by automated mechanisms that continuously capture, sort and analyze large amounts of Web-based data. This paper traces the historical development of music metadata management and its ties to the growing of the field of ‘big data’ knowledge production. In particular, it explores the data catching mechanisms enabled by the Spotify-owned company The Echo Nest, and provides a close reading of parts of the company’s collection and analysis of data regarding musicians. Doing so, it reveals evidence of the ways in which trivial, random, and unintentional data enters into the data steams that power today’s digital music distribution. The presence of such curious data needs to be understood as a central part of contemporary algorithmic knowledge production, and calls for a need to re-conceptualize both (digital) musical artifacts and (digital) musical expertize.

  • 4.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Crowdsourcing identities: On identity as an existential practice mediated by contemporary digital technology2019In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 8112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to outline crowdsourcing identities as one way to think about humans’ making of identity when practiced in conditions mediated by contemporary digital technologies. It brings together human practices, theory and technology and draws on perspectives of existentialism, social constructivism, technology and ideas about crowdsourcing. Humans’ making of identity is considered a practice that concerns continuous requests and answers about existential matters of being, becoming and belonging: Who am I? How do I appear to others? Who can I be and become? Where do I belong? In that sense, it is a relational and social practice that is essential to exist as someone — rather than as no one. However, contemporary digital technologies such as social media are not considered essential to this practice. Technologies are thought of as mediating conditions where, for instance, social interactions about existential matters, such as the making of identity, can be practiced in ways that extend on what were possible in predigital times. In multimodal, multidirectional, collaborative and networked ways humans can represent, communicate, gather information and also engage online crowds of others in continuous requests and answers about being, becoming and belonging; Who am I? How do I appear to others? Who can I be and become? And, where do I belong? To illustrate this, two brief narratives of Mary and Steve introduce the article. The making of identity, the duality of Self and Other, the gaze as a panopticon of others, identity and technology and ideas about crowdsourcing are presented and outlined, converging into the interpretive lens of crowdsourcing identities — one way to think about the making of identity when practiced in conditions mediated by contemporary digital technology.

  • 5.
    Marti, Patrizia
    et al.
    Communication Science Department, University of Siena.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Forskningsinstitutet Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Forskningsinstitutet Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Tittarelli, Michele
    Communication Science Department, University of Siena.
    True, Nicholas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Papworth, Nigel
    Forskningsinstitutet Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Embodying culture: Interactive installation on women’s rights2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes an interactive installation exploring perspectives on women’s rights, triggering visitors’ personal reflections through an immersive experience. Starting from the life histories of the women depicted in three paintings from fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth century, we explored three themes: emancipation, self-determination and violence. In the installation, representations of these three paintings were fragmented into panels, floating in the space suspended from a self-standing structure. On these elements, both the original painting and a writhing of visual material were dynamically displayed using a projector. The presence and movement of visitors in the room was tracked by means of a Kinect™ camera and influenced both the position and movements of the panels. A software crawler monitored discussions and debates on social networks. The intensity of these discussions was reflected in the movements of the panels and the content of the projections. The purpose of this interactive installation is to engage visitors in composing a harmonious picture of the complex domain of women’s rights. The experiential form confronts visitors with the opinions of other people debating the theme worldwide. The installation was the outcome of a craft-inspired learning module, grounded on constructivism and reflective practice.

  • 6.
    Webb, Lewis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Shame transfigured: Slut-shaming from Rome to cyberspace2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slut-shaming, the public exposure and shaming of individuals for their (perceived or actual) sexual behavior, is rife on the Internet; it primarily affects women, and it too often has tragic outcomes. Slut-shaming is not new, but a form of cultural suppression of female sexuality that has been practiced since antiquity. In this paper, I historicize this phenomenon, by comparing and contrasting cases of slut-shaming from the Roman Republic with recent cases on the Internet, and I maintain that the focus of this slut-shaming, namely sexual virtue, has remained the same over time, but that the unregulated nature of the Internet has increased its scope and impact. A central contention of this paper is that women have been complicit in this slut-shaming; they have shamed other women for their sexual behavior, and have done so because it conferred social benefits on them. We will see that men and women have used the Internet to perpetuate and maintain the cultural suppression of female sexuality, and expose women to increased scrutiny over their sexual behavior.

1 - 6 of 6
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