umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Johansson, Eva E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    The meanings given to gender in studies on multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a literature review2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 23, p. 2255-2270Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess and describe the meanings given to "gender" in scientific publications that evaluate multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Method: A systematic literature search for papers evaluating multimodal rehabilitation was conducted. The PubMed and EBSCO databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Two or three researchers independently read each paper, performed a quality assessment and coded meanings of gender using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Twenty-seven papers were included in the review. Gender was used very differently in the MMR studies investigated but primarily it referred to factual differences between men and women. Only one paper provided a definition of the concept of gender and how it had been used in that study. In the content analysis, the meaning of gender formed three categories: "Gender as a factual difference", "The man is the ideal" and "Gender as a result of social role expectations".

    Conclusions: The meaning of the concept of gender in multimodal rehabilitation is undefined and needs to be developed further. The way the concept is used should be defined in the design and evaluation of multimodal rehabilitation in future studies.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    Healthcare professionals should reflect on gender relations in encounters with patients, selection of patients into rehabilitation programs and design of programs. In rehabilitation for chronic pain the patients' social circumstances and cultural context should be given the same consideration as biological sex and pain symptoms.

  • 2.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions at older age: applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 23-24, p. 2208-2216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify variables from different components of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) associated with older people's participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions. Method: Participants (N = 186) were community-living, 65-88 years old and 52% men. The dependent variables, participation frequency (linear regression) and perceived participation restrictions (logistic regression), were measured using The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument. Independent variables were selected from various ICF components. Results: Higher participation frequency was associated with living in urban rather than rural community (beta = 2.8, p < 0.001), physically active lifestyle (beta = 4.6, p < 0.001) and higher cognitive function (beta = 0.3, p = 0.009). Lower participation frequency was associated with being older (beta = -0.2, p = 0.002) and depressive symptoms (beta = -0.2, p = 0.029). Older adults living in urban areas, having more advanced lower extremities capacity, or that were employed had higher odds of less perceived participation restrictions (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, p = 0.001; OR = 1.09, p < 0.001; OR = 3.7, p = 0.011; respectively). In contrast, the odds of less perceived participation restriction decreased as depressive symptoms increased (OR = 0.8, p = 0.011). Conclusions: Our results highlight the importance of capturing and understanding both frequency and restriction aspects of older persons' participation. ICF may be a helpful reference to map factors associated with participation and to study further potentially modifiable influencing factors such as depressive symptoms and advanced lower extremity capacity.

  • 3.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hamberg, Jern
    Heiden, Marina
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    The ProFitMap-neck - reliability and validity of a questionnaire for measuring symptoms and functional limitations in neck pain2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 13, p. 1096-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess overall reliability and validity of a neck-specific questionnaire, the Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire (ProFitMap-neck), on three chronic neck pain groups. Method: Participating groups were as follows: whiplash associated disorders, inpatient care (IP-WAD, n = 127); nonspecific neck pain, inpatient care (IP-NS, n = 83) and nonspecific neck pain subjects (non-IP-NS, n = 104). All groups answered the ProFitMap-neck and the SF-36, whereas non-IP-NS also answered the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Functional Self-Efficacy Scale (SES). Internal consistency, test-retest reliability and components of convergent construct, face and content validity were determined for the ProFitMap-neck. Results: The ProFitMap-neck showed good internal consistency in all three groups, and ICC test-retest reliability (0.80-0.91). Good correlation (0.66-0.78) and highest agreement was reached with NDI. According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, the symptom scale of the ProFitMap-neck was mainly classified to the domain of impairments-body functions, and the functional limitation scale to the activity limitation domain. Conclusion: The results indicate that the ProFitMap-neck is valid for measuring symptoms and functional limitations in people with chronic neck pain. The combination of a composite total score of symptoms and function as well as separate scores of each domain makes ProFitMap-neck suitable for research as well as in clinical practice.

  • 4. Briones-Vozmediano, Erica
    et al.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Public Health Research Group of Alicante University, Alicante, Spain.
    Vives-Cases, Carmen
    "The complaining women": health professionals' perceptions on patients with fibromyalgia in Spain2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 14, p. 1679-1685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to explore health service providers' perceptions regarding fibromyalgia patients in Spain and (2) to analyze possible consequences of these perceptions in terms of how health service providers construct the disease and treat their patients.

    DESIGN: Qualitative study.

    SUBJECTS/PATIENTS: Twelve health service providers (eight men, four women) involved in the care of fibromyalgia patients. Providers were from different disciplines and included general practitioners, rheumatologists, occupational doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, physiotherapists and behavioral specialists from Spain.

    METHOD: We performed individual semistructured interviews, which were recorded and transcribed to conduct a qualitative content analysis supported by Atlas.ti-7.

    RESULTS: We identified three categories from the interviews: (1) the fibromyalgia patient prototype: the complaining woman, (2) fibromyalgia is considered a women's health issue, but male patients are a privileged minority, and (3) health professionals' attitudes toward fibromyalgia patients: are they really suffering or pretending?

    CONCLUSION: The uncertainty surrounding fibromyalgia together with the fact that those affected are primarily women, seem to influence professional practice in terms of lack of recognition of Fibromyalgia as a severe disease. Increased training of all health professionals is essential to improving the support and attention given to patients suffering from fibromyalgia.

    Implications for rehabilitation: Fibromyalgia

    • In order to improve fibromyalgia patients' attention, health providers should learn how to assist patients without prejudices.

    • Training programs for health providers should include sensitization about the severity of fibromyalgia.

    • Health providers should be aware of the existence of stereotypes about women suffering from fibromyalgia.

    • Fibromyalgia protocols should give skills to health providers to avoid offering a gender-biased attention to patients.

  • 5.
    Brogårdh, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Persson, Ann L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjölund, Bengt H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Sollerman hand function test in patients with chronic stroke.2007In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 145-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine whether the Sollerman hand function test is reliable in a test-retest situation in patients with chronic stroke. METHOD: Three independent examiners observed each patient at three experimental sessions; two days in week 1 (short-term test-retest) and one day in week 4 (long-term test-retest). A total of 24 patients with chronic stroke (mean age; 59.7 years, mean time since stroke onset 29.6 months) participated. The examiners simultaneously assessed the patients' ability to perform 20 subtests. Both ordinal data (generalized kappa) and total sum scores (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (Spearman's rho), intra class correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) and mean differences) were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: There was agreement (kappa >or= 0.4) between the examiners for 15 out of the 20 subtests. Using total sum scores, the agreement within the examiners, both short- and long-term, was higher than 0.96 (for Spearman's rho and ICC, respectively). The mean differences were 0.29 - 1.0/80 points within each examiner. Agreement between the examiners at each session was higher than 0.96 (Spearman's rho) and 0.92 (ICC), respectively. Systematic differences (p < 0.05) were, however, found between examiners A and B/C for all sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The Sollerman hand function test seems to be a reliable test in patients with chronic stroke, but we recommend that the same examiner evaluates a patient's hand function pre- and post-treatment.

  • 6.
    Edlund, Curt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The physician's role in the vocational rehabilitation process2002In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 24, no 14, p. 727-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To describe and analyse physicians' experiences of working with sick-listing and vocational rehabilitation, their perceptions of their co-actors and the interaction they participate in.

    METHOD: Thematic interviews with 14 physicians in Västerbotten County, northern Sweden. The physicians were active in primary or occupational health care, or as hospital doctors. The interviews were conducted during the autumn of 1996. The interviews were tape recorded and analysed according to Grounded theory.

    RESULTS: Feelings of isolation and diminished control, lack of time and increased demands are all seen as obstacles for doing an optimal job with sick-listing and rehabilitation. Other obstacles are insufficient knowledge regarding the labour market and the social insurance legislation. Interaction between primary and in-patient care does not function satisfactorily. The doctors believe in their patients and a majority of the doctors feel that the patients' own understanding of/need for sick-listing guides the doctor in his or her position regarding sick-listing. To facilitate return to work, the doctors encourage part-time sick-listing.

    CONCLUSIONS: The interviews show that the physicians experience a growing discrepancy between ideal and reality. They want to be able to act as "team players", but experience increasing demands due to the increased number of patients who are sicker than before. The doctors experience that decision latitude has diminished and this has been followed by less time for patients.

  • 7.
    Eklund, Elsine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Häger-Ross, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hand function and disability of the arm, shoulder and hand in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 23, p. 1955-1962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine hand function and disability in persons with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and to evaluate the possible correlations between hand function and disability.

    Methods: Nine male, 11 female (24-73 yrs) persons with CMT in northern Sweden and a matched control group of 18 men, 22 women (21-73 yrs) participated in the study. Measurements applied were tests of dexterity (Box and Block Test; Nine-Hole Peg test), grip strength (Grippit®), tactile gnosis (Shape Texture Identification test) and upper-limb disability (Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, DASH).

    Results: Hand function in CMT was reduced (p<0.001) to about 60% of normal, as indicated by each of the separate outcome measures as well as by a constructed summary index of hand function. DASH score median was 38.8 (range 0-66.7) and was clearly related to hand function (r=0.64-0.83).

    Conclusion: Reduced hand function in CMT was found at different dimensions according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). We suggest that DASH can be used in persons with CMT though clinicians should be aware that patients might score lower than expected, possibly due to a long process of adaptation when learning to live with a slowly progressive disease.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Arne, Mats
    Uppsala University, Uppsala and County Council of Värmland.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Keep moving to retain the healthy self: the meaning of physical exercise in individuals with Parkinson's disease2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 26, p. 2237-2244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore and generate an understanding of the meaning of physical exercise in the lives of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) participating in an exercise program. Method: A qualitative design, using Grounded Theory methodology, was used. Eleven individuals diagnosed with PD were interviewed. Results: The core category "Keep moving to retain the healthy self" identified the continuing process of maintaining functions and activities in the individuals' lives, in which exercise was a major contribution. Two categories, "Having explicit life goals" and "Having confidence in one's own ability", were important prerequisites for adherence to physical exercise. Four categories - "Taking rational position", "Exercising to slow progression", "Exercising to achieve well-being" and "Using exercise as coping strategy" - were generated as important for starting and maintaining exercise habits. Conclusions: Insights into the process of exercising in view of living with PD were generated, which have implications for strategies in promoting physical exercise in older individuals with PD.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Johansson, Gudrun M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Balance and mobility in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease - a five-year follow-up of a cohort in northern Sweden2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The presence of early balance impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease has not been fully investigated.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine balance and mobility, self-perceived unsteadiness, self-reported falls, and effects of medication on balance among patients at their first visit to a neurological clinic and during the ensuing five years.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were collected from a prospective longitudinal study. One hundred and forty-five patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 31 healthy controls were included. The outcome measures were the Berg Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go, the Postural Stability test and a questionnaire.

    RESULTS: At their first visit to the neurological clinic, the patients performed less well on the Berg Balance Scale (p < 0.001, r = 0.36), the Timed Up and Go (p < 0.001, r = 0.32), and the Postural Stability test (p < 0.001, r = 0.35) compared with the controls. In addition, a higher percentage of the patients reported self-perceived unsteadiness (p < 0.001, phi = 0.47). During the ensuing five years, balance and mobility worsened both with and without medication (p < 0.01, r = 0.24-0.37), although with small median differences.

    CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed to confirm that minor balance impairments exist even at the time of diagnosis and worsen during the ensuing five years. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Impairments in balance and mobility may occur early in Parkinson's disease, especially in the elderly patients, and seem to worsen during the first five years. There is a need to use sensitive outcome measures and to ask the patients about unsteadiness and falls to detect balance impairment in this cohort. Parkinsonian medication has a limited effect on balance and may preferably be complemented with balance exercises to target balance impairment early in Parkinson's disease.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Gudrun M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Häger, Charlotte K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Measurement properties of the motor evaluation scale for upper extremity in stroke patients (MESUPES)2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 288-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate inter-rater reliability of the Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke patients (MESUPES), to provide estimates of the minimal detectable change (MDC) of the MESUPES and to investigate concurrent validity in relation to the arm scores of the Modified Motor Assessment Scale (M MAS). Methods: Forty-two stroke patients (mean age 56 +/- 12 years) were independently assessed within a 48-hours window by two raters in different pairs (total available raters = 4). Results: Weighted. analysis indicated good to very good agreement at item level (range 0.63-0.96). The relative and absolute reliability of the total score of MESUPES (maximum 58) was high according to the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC = 0.98) and the standard error of measurement (SEM = 2.68). The MDC for three levels of confidence was calculated: A score change of 8, 7 and 5 is necessary for a MDC to have confidence of 95%, 90% and 80%, respectively, of a genuine change. Correlation between the MESUPES and M MAS was high (r(s) = 0.87). Conclusions: The MESUPES shows high inter-rater reliability, and our study provides useful estimates of MDC for different levels of certainty. Additional research to confirm concurrent validity and to examine other psychometric properties of the MESUPES such as sensitivity is needed.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Ulla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Predicting return to work after brain injury using occupational therapy assessments2001In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 474-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of occupational therapy assessments used in an outreach rehabilitation programme to predict return to work after brain injury. The assessments represent the ICIDH-2 levels of body function and activity. Method: Fifty-six persons in a late phase after brain injury who had been admitted to the rehabilitation programme during 2 years were followed up according to work status. The follow up was made at a minimum of 2 years after injury. Demographic data and scores from the occupational therapy assessments were compared for the two groups who were back to work or studies (BTW) and not back to work or studies (NBTW). Results: Assessments of memory, visual perception and apraxia separated between the two groups BTW and NBTW. Logistic regression showed that memory score in combination with data on PADL made up the best predictive model. In a subgroup with 21 persons where data on IADL were added to memory and PADL the predictive value was even stronger. Conclusions: In this study we found that occupational therapy assessments were valuable in predicting failure to return to work or studies after brain injury.

  • 12.
    Kerstin, Wahman
    et al.
    Rehab Station Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gabriele, Biguet
    Neurotec Department, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Richard, Levi
    Rehab Station Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden and Neurotec Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What promotes physical activity after spinal cord injury?: An interview study from a patient perspective2006In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 481-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Physical activity in people with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is of importance not only for maintaining health but also for increasing the possibilities of living an independent life. Physical inactivity leads to poorer muscular and cardiovascular conditioning and sub-optimal levels of functioning. To help people with SCI to achieve optimum physical activity, it is important to understand what promotes the incorporation of regular physical activity into daily life. The aim of this study was thus to identify factors that may promote participation in physical activity among people with spinal cord injuries.

    METHOD: Qualitative multiple case studies. Sixteen participants with SCI were interviewed.

    RESULT: Four main themes of promoting factors could be identified. They were: using cognitive and behavioural strategies; finding supporting environmental solutions; exploring motivation post injury; and capturing new frames of reference.

    CONCLUSION: By utilising the motivational power of role models, together with the other motivational factors identified in this study, such as identifying relevant individual motives post injury and capturing new frames of reference, the process towards physical active life may be facilitated.

  • 13.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Relationship between participation in life situations and life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 19, p. 1592-1597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To assess the relationship between participation and problems with participation in life situations, and life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio.

    Methods. One hundred fifty-eight persons with late effects of polio responded to a postal questionnaire including the Swedish versions of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire (IPA-S) and Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11).

    Results. The persons' perceived participation in the five domains of participation in the IPA-S was significantly correlated with their satisfaction with life as a whole and with most of the 10 domains of life satisfaction. Significant differences in satisfaction with life as a whole and with eight of the 10 domains in LiSat-11 were found between groups of increasing severe problems with participation. Greater number of reports of severe problems with participation corresponded with gradually decreased satisfaction with life as a whole and with satisfaction in the eight domains in LiSat-11.

    Conclusions. Perceived participation and problems with participation in life situations are determinants of life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio. This implies that addressing participation and problems with participation in the rehabilitation of persons with late effects of polio may lead to an enhanced life satisfaction.

  • 14.
    Lilliehorn, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Living at a residency away from home during radiotherapy as narrated by 52 patients with breast cancer: a cage of safety and discomfort2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 450-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In the Nordic countries many patients with cancer conclude their treatment with 5–6 weeks of radiotherapy while staying at a residency far away from home. The experience of this stay, from a rehabilitation perspective, has not previously been studied.

    Method: Fifty-two women with breast cancer were followed with repeated thematic interviews from diagnosis up to 2 years.

    Results: The majority of women saw both pros and cons with their stay, and overall the stay could be described as “A cage of safety and discomfort”. Pros included “Safety”, “Closeness and learning”, and “Feeling like being on holiday”, while cons included “An intruding self-image”, “Isolation and increased vulnerability”, and “A loss of function”. Some patients supported their own rehabilitation by socializing with their “fellow sisters”, while others isolated themselves and mainly found it burdensome to be there.

    Conclusions: The residence becomes an interactional field with the potential to facilitate patients in resuming a new everyday life. The women who do not interact with others and/or who are stuck with feelings of anxiety should be offered the opportunity to take part in a group exclusively for “fellow sisters” in a similar situation.

  • 15.
    Malmgren-Olsson, Eva-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Bränholm, Inga-Britt
    A comparison between three physiotherapy approaches with regard to health-related factors in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal disorders.2002In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 308-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The main aim of this study was to compare the effects of Body Awareness Therapy (BAT), the Feldenkrais (FK) method and conventional physiotherapy on changes of health-related quality of life (HRQL), self-efficacy and sense of coherence (SOC) in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal disorders. A second aim was to explore the relationships between SOC, HRQL and self-efficacy and to examine whether SOC could be a predictor of the treatment outcome.

    METHOD: A total of 78 patients, 64 women and 14 men, were recruited consecutively to the three treatment groups. The instrument used were the Swedish version of SF-36, the 20 items Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale and the 29-item questionnaire by Antonovsky.

    RESULTS: The results showed that there were significant improvements on all subscales of SF-36 except for one. By using effect-size values it was found that the BAT and FK groups reached larger effect-size than did the conventional therapy group. These two groups also improved in self-efficacy of pain and stayed stable while the third group deteriorated at the one-year follow-up. There were significant correlations between the mental dimensions of SF-36 and SOC indicating that the instruments may measure aspects of the same global construct.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although few significant differences between the three treatment groups the BAT and FK seemed to improve health-related quality of life and self-efficacy of pain to a somewhat higher degree than the conventional physiotherapy. SOC seemed to be a stable trait measure over time.

  • 16.
    Nordvall Strömberg, Petronella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Enhanced information regarding exercise training as treatment is needed. An interview study in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 16, p. 1424-1430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to describe thoughts and attitudes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when talking about exercise training as treatment.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were performed and analyzed with the grounded theory method. Four men and six women were interviewed (ages 66-84 years), with moderate to severe COPD, and no experience of organized exercise training as treatment for COPD.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in one core category, unknown territory, and three categories, good for those who can, but not for me; fear of future; and mastering. Exercise training as treatment was perceived by the participants as something unknown. It was also described as important for others but not for them. Their perceptions were that they could not perform exercise training, and did not have the knowledge of what or how to perform exercise that was good for them.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD, with no previous experience of exercise training as treatment for their disease, describe exercise training as something unknown and unimportant for them. The results provide important knowledge for healthcare professionals regarding how to educate patients with COPD about the content and benefits of exercise training as treatment. Implications for Rehabilitation Exercise training is effective for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with regard to dyspnea, physical capacity, health-related quality of life, and health care use. Patients with COPD perceive a lack of information regarding exercise training as treatment. The information and the presentation of exercise training as treatment might be of importance to get better adherence to this treatment.

  • 17.
    Nyberg, Vanja E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Novo, Mehmed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Sjölund, Bengt H
    Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Copenhagen, Denmark ; Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Do multidimensional pain inventory scale score changes indicate risk of receiving sick leave benefits 1 year after a pain rehabilitation programme?2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 17-18, p. 1548-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study whether scale score changes in the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) can predict which persons disabled by pain will receive sick leave benefits 1 year after completing a pain rehabilitation programme.

    Method: An observational study of MPI data derived from 1468 patients, 388 men and 1080 women, who had participated in multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioural oriented pain rehabilitation programmes in Sweden, collected from the Swedish Quality Register for Pain Rehabilitation, before, at the end and 1 year after the programme.

    Results: Most MPI scale scores showed improvements after completing a pain rehabilitation programme and this improvement was sustained after 1 year. Moreover, we found that a decrease in MPI scales scores for Pain severity and Interference immediately after the pain rehabilitation programme decreased the risk of being on full-time sick leave 1 year later [OR 0.85, (95% CI 0.73–0.99) and OR 0.73, (95% CI 0.61–0.87), respectively]. The Interference scale, which may be considered to include ICF components of both activities and participation, might represent the core of suffering among persons disabled with pain.

    Conclusions: A rehabilitation intervention directed to combating the consequences of pain in activities and participation rather than against pain per se might lead to improved working capacity.

  • 18.
    Pohl, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nordin, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gender perspective on fear of falling using the classification of functioning as the model2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 214-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate associations between fear of falling (FOF) and recurrent falls among women and men, and gender differences in FOF with respect to International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Methods: Community-dwelling people (n = 230, 75-93 years, 72% women) were included and followed 1 year regarding falls. Data collection included self-reported demographics, questionnaires, and physical performance-based tests. FOF was assessed with the question "Are you afraid of falling?". Results were discussed with a gender relational approach. Results: At baseline 55% women (n = 92) and 22% men (n = 14) reported FOF. During the follow-up 21% women (n = 35) and 30% men (n = 19) experienced recurrent falls. There was an association between gender and FOF (p = 0.001), but not between FOF and recurrent falls (p = 0.79), or between gender and recurrent falls (p = 0.32). FOF was related to Personal factors and Activity and Participation. The relationship between FOF and Personal factors was in opposite directions for women and men. Conclusions: Results did not support the prevailing paradigm that FOF increases rate of recurrent falls in community-dwelling people, and indicated that the answer to "Are you afraid of falling?" might be highly influenced by gendered patterns.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    The question "Are you afraid of falling?" has no predictive value when screening for the risk of falling in independent community-dwelling women or men over 75 years of age.

    Gendered patterns might influence the answer to the question "Are you afraid of falling?" Healthcare personnel are recommended to be aware of this when asking older women and men about fear of falling.

  • 19.
    Pohl, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dizdar, Nil
    Hallert, Eva
    The Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music Method: a feasibility study in Parkinson's disease2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 26, p. 2197-2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of the novel intervention, Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music (RGRM™) Method compared to a control group for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).

    Method: Eighteen patients, mean age 68, participating in a disability study within a neurological rehabilitation centre, were randomly allocated to intervention group (n = 12) or control group (n = 6). Feasibility was assessed by comparing effects of the intervention on clinical outcome measures (primary outcome: mobility as assessed by two-dimensional motion analysis, secondary outcomes: mobility, cognition, quality of life, adherence, adverse events and eligibility).

    Results: Univariable analyses showed no significant differences between groups following intervention. However, analyses suggested that patients in the intervention group improved more on mobility (p = 0.006), cognition and quality of life than patients in the control group. There were no adverse events and a high level of adherence to therapy was observed.

    Conclusions: In this disability study, the use of the RGRM™ Method showed promising results in the intervention group and the adherence level was high. Our results suggest that most assessments chosen are eligible to use in a larger randomized controlled study for patients with PD.

  • 20.
    Röding, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindström, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Perceived impaired physical and cognitive functions after stroke in men and women between 18 and 55 years of age: a national survey2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 13, p. 1092-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: We describe self-reported consequences for physical and cognitive functions, detect possible gender differences, and find factors that were associated with deteriorated physical function in younger stroke patients, independent in their personal activities of daily life. METHODS: This study involved all first ever stroke patients, aged 18-55 years, registered in the Swedish national quality register for stroke. A questionnaire was answered by 1068 patients 8-36 months after the stroke. Changes were sought in physical and cognitive functions as compared with the pre-stroke condition. RESULTS: Eight hundred and sixty-seven patients (83%) were independent in personal activities of daily life. Significant differences between men and women were found: deteriorated physical ability was reported by 56-71% of the men and 65-79% of the women; deteriorated cognitive function was reported by 48-57% of the men and 57-68% of the women. Many patients (70% men, 77% women) reported that they had received insufficient information about physical exertion. Significant associations were found between deteriorated physical function and deteriorated cognitive function as well as fear of physical exertion. CONCLUSIONS: Deterioration was found in physical and cognitive functions greater in women then in men. Insecurity regarding physical exertion existed indicating that younger stroke patients might need information directly aimed at physical functioning and more gender specific than today. This study has raised the awareness that there also might be gender differences in other fields, which needs further studies.

  • 21.
    Röding, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindström, Britta
    Malm, Jan
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Frustrated and invisible: younger stroke patients’ experiences of the rehabilitation process2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 25, no 15, p. 867-874Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Dock, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Häger, Charlotte K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindh Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Motion interactive video games in home training for children with cerebral palsy: parents' perceptions2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 925-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore parents' perceptions of using low-cost motion interactive video games as home training for their children with mild/moderate cerebral palsy.

    Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with parents from 15 families after participation in an intervention where motion interactive games were used daily in home training for their child. A qualitative content analysis approach was applied.

    Results: The parents' perception of the training was very positive. They expressed the view that motion interactive video games may promote positive experiences of physical training in rehabilitation, where the social aspects of gaming were especially valued. Further, the parents experienced less need to take on coaching while gaming stimulated independent training. However, there was a desire for more controlled and individualized games to better challenge the specific rehabilitative need of each child.

    Conclusions: Low-cost motion interactive games may provide increased motivation and social interaction to home training and promote independent training with reduced coaching efforts for the parents. In future designs of interactive games for rehabilitation purposes, it is important to preserve the motivational and social features of games while optimizing the individualized physical exercise.

  • 23. Selander, John
    et al.
    Marnetoft, Sven-Uno
    Åsell, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Predictors for successful vocational rehabilitation for clients with back pain problems2007In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 215-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify predicting factors for successful vocational rehabilitation for people with back pain problems.

    METHOD: The study was based on data from 347 long-term sick-listed clients collected at the onset of vocational rehabilitation. The outcome was measured 6 months after the conclusion of rehabilitation.

    RESULTS: In a first bi-variate analysis, a considerable number of variables were associated with the rehabilitation outcome. In a second multivariate analysis, only four associations remained. These were age, general health, vitality and internal locus of control. Young vital clients in good general health, with a high internal locus of control were more likely than others to return to work.

    CONCLUSION: The findings regarding age, general health and vitality are well in line with previous studies. The findings regarding internal locus of control are more unique.

  • 24.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Holmner, Elisabeth Pietilä
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Healthcare professional experiences with patients who participate in multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary care: a qualitative study2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 21, p. 2085-2094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Exploring healthcare professional experiences of Multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) in primary care.

    Methods: Fourteen healthcare professionals (11 women, 3 men) were individually interviewed about their work with MMR in primary care. Interviews covered experiences of assessing patients and work with patients in the programme. Transcribed interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in four categories: select patients for success; a multilevel challenge; ethical dilemmas and considering what is a good result. MMR work was experienced as useful and efficient, but also challenging because of patient complexity. Preconceptions about who is a suitable patient for MMR influenced the selection of patients (e.g. gender, different culture). Interviewees were conflicted about not to being able to offer MMR to patients who were not going to return to work. They thought that there were more factors to evaluate MMR than by the proportion that return to work.

    Conclusions: Healthcare professionals perceive MMR as a helpful method for treating chronic pain patients. At the same time, they thought that only including patients who would return to work conflicted with their ethical views on equal healthcare for all patients. Preconceptions can influence selection for, and work with, MMR.

  • 25.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Implementing multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary care: a health care professional perspective2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 39, no 21, p. 2173-2181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore professional perspectives on how to start and work with multimodal pain rehabilitation within primary healthcare. Methods: Fourteen healthcare professionals (11 women, 3 men) were individually interviewed about their experiences of starting and working with multimodal pain. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed by qualitative content analysis. This study was part of a larger project, which aimed at evaluating multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary care. Results: The analysis resulted in six categories. Two categories were about management engagement: putting the focus on rehabilitation and creating appropriate conditions. Three were about professional engagement: importance of driving spirits, creating a program - a process, and good teamwork - not a coincidence. The last category was about professional gain from multimodal rehabilitation (MMR): team work is enriching. Conclusions: To enable implementation of MMR in primary care, managers on all organizational levels must take responsibility for allowing rehabilitation to be a priority. A driving spirit among the professionals facilitates the start, but the entire team is important when processing a program. Creating good teamwork requires hard work, e.g., negotiations for consensus about rehabilitation, and assumption of responsibility by each team member. Collaboration between professionals was perceived to strengthen and enhance knowledge about the patients.

  • 26.
    Wadell, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lundgren, Rune
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Group training in patients with COPD: long-term effects of decreased training frequency2005In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 571-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose.To investigate effects of decreased training frequency in patients with COPD.

    Methods.Forty-three COPD patients participated in a controlled study. The intervention group (30 patients) trained 3 times a week during 3 months and once a week during 6 months. Before, after 3 and 9 months all patients performed walking tests, cycle ergometer tests and responded questionnaires on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (SGRQ, SF-36).

    Results.At 9 months compared to 3 months there were no changes in distance walked in the groups. Both groups decreased their VO2peak and the training group deteriorated in HRQoL. At 9 months compared to baseline the training group showed increased distance walked compared to the control group. In the disease-specific SGRQ the training group tended to improve their activity score while the control group tended to deteriorate in total score. In SF-36 the control group decreased their physical component score.

    Conclusion.Training once a week does not seem to be sufficient to maintain the level achieved after the 3-month period of training in COPD patients. However, training once a week during 6 months preceded by 3 months of high frequency training seems to prevent deterioration in physical capacity and HRQoL compared to baseline. Further studies are needed to investigate how to best sustain the benefits gained after physical training.

  • 27.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Well, I'm healthy, but… - lay perspectives on health among people with musculoskeletal disorders2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to investigate lay perspectives on health among people with musculoskeletal disorders.

    METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were performed with 39 women and 30 men, (aged 22-63 years) with long-term, non-specific musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder and/or low back. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: These people experienced health as "having resources and opportunities to lead the life one wants". Three categories, "a good enough physical and psychological functioning, freedom of action, and a positive state of emotion and an enriching life", illustrate the different resources and opportunities that the informants described as important for them to perceive themselves as healthy. The informants also reflected on "being ill" and "being well" and what makes the difference. Five aspects influenced the dynamics of their health experiences: "body and soul, prognosis, character of symptoms, physical and social activity, and emotional state". Consequently, the informants expressed a holistic view of health, where the focus lies on the opportunity and the ability to lead their lives the way they want.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study points at the value of taking lay perspectives on health into account, as it might increase the opportunity to design effective, personalized rehabilitation strategies. Implications for Rehabilitation Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are difficult to cure and actions to alleviate suffering are of most importance to increase wellbeing and thereby work ability. Research on lay perspectives can contribute towards a deepened understanding of the health experiences of the affected, and thereby the development of the goals and activities of rehabilitation. Our models, that present the view of health and aspects important for achieving wellness among people with MSDs, can contribute in the development of multimodal rehabilitation. The results can also be useful as a base in the evaluation of clinical practice.

  • 28. Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    et al.
    Björklund, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nilsson, Annika
    An initial factor analysis of prominent aspects of health experiences for women with neck-shoulder pain2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 934-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The prospect of adequate comparisons is essential to decide on the effectiveness of different treatments. As there is a lack of unity in choice of questionnaires and included measures concerning musculoskeletal disorders, further investigations based on international recommendations are of interest. The intention of present study was to initiate the development of a clinically useful short-form questionnaire. The aim was to select items that capture prominent health aspects for women with neck-shoulder pain and thereby reduce the number of items to a clinically more convenient amount, and to determine the underlying structure of included items.

    Method: Data were collected in a randomised controlled trial including women with non-specific neck-shoulder pain > 3 months (n = 117). Data collection included three core domains: pain intensity, physical and emotional functioning, and analysis was performed using Principal component analysis, and Varimax rotation.

    Results: The resulting 9-factor solution included interference, solicitous/distracting responses, mood and feelings about self and relations, pain intensity, punishing responses, personal growth, life control, sleep, and appetite (29 items).

    Conclusions: The results will contribute to the development of a reduced battery of questions representing core dimensions. Such questionnaire would lighten the assessment load in the clinic as well as in research.

1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf