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  • 1.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strategies to handle the challenges of intimacy in nighttime home care services2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of intimate and personal care constitutes a challenge for both careworkers and care recipients and is still a neglected area of research. An observational study of the interaction between the careworkers and care recipients in night-time home care services was conducted in a large municipality in Sweden. The results were analysed in light of previous research and theorising on strategies for handling intimacy in intimate care. The study highlights what appears to be a tension between the ways in which the recipient of care is conceptualised as an active consumer of care in present-day guidelines and the strategies chosen on the part of both caregivers and care recipients, when intimacy and integrity is most at stake, and framed as it is by the care recipients' situation of dependency and vulnerability. Home care services night-time was shown to be a case that markedly differs from many other settings of intimate care, but in the interactional routines intimate care came forth as a smooth and minimally obtrusive activity. The careworkers and care recipients engaged in strategies such as disattention, eye-discipline, middle-distance orientation, and objectification, thereby serving the purpose of balancing the transgressions of thresholds of intimacy.

  • 2.
    Blom, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Review of the book: Toward evidence-based practice: variations on a theme2011In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 142-145Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Richter, Jörg
    An investigation of mental health and personality in Swedish social work students upon entry to university training2014In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 572-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to describe Swedish social work students’ personality characteristicsupon entry to their training and to analyze relationships between personality traits,mental health, and some sociodemographic variables. One hundred and twenty-onefemale social work students completed a sociodemographic form, the Temperamentand Character Inventory, and the Symptom Checklist. They scored significantly higheron harm avoidance, reward dependence, and self-transcendence and reported moresomatization, obsessive compulsive, and phobic-anxious symptoms, and less hostility,than Swedish individuals from the general population of the same age. Personalitytraits significantly predicted the various mental symptom scores. It is recommended toimplement modules or training courses within social work training in Sweden that bring an improvement of self-directedness and cooperativeness character trait intofocus.

  • 4.
    Isaksson, Cristine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Looking for 'social work' in school social work2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 191-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School social workers can be seen as a professional group operating on the margin of an educational logic that dominates schools as institutions. This conditions what tasks they are assigned and what aspects of social work knowledge they will find relevant. On the other hand, the role as a sole professional and relative outsider in the organization provides a potential for school social workers to transcend established theories of social work practice. This article aims to investigate how social work theory is applied in school social work. Twelve semi-structured interviews with school social workers were analysed in terms of how they relate to four knowledge approaches derived from the literature: task-centred, systems theory, strengths and anti-oppressive. Contrary to claims within the sociology of professions that social work practice is formed largely by organizational context rather than a discipline-specific knowledge base, the interviewees seemed to lean on a robust professional foundation within social work theory. Interviewees strongly emphasised their role as working for the individual pupil and positioned themselves as somewhat in opposition to a somewhat oppressive school environment.

  • 5.
    Kalman, Hildur
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Andersson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Framing of Intimate Care in Home Care Services2014In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 402-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Provision of intimate care is a challenge for the care worker, as well as for the recipient of care, in terms both of how this care is to be performed and of how to manage feelings such as anxiety and embarrassment. In home care services, most intimate care work is performed by non-professionals who have received little or no formal or in-house training, and who are at risk of being left to devise their own methods or coping strategies. This article reports on a participant observation study of intimate care in home care services in Sweden. The strategies used to handle intimacy in care work displayed similarities, as well as dissimilarities, to those of professional framing identified in earlier studies of medical and nursing practice. There are similarities in terms of how framing was accomplished in a balance between a distanced matter-of-fact stance and one of personal acknowledgement created in interplay between care workers and care recipient. There are dissimilarities in terms of the challenges presented by the home care setting. As the relationship between care worker and care recipient in intimate care is a particularly precarious one, lack of guidance and formal training may hamper care and lead to neglect.

  • 6.
    Markström, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborg universitet.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Case management for people with psychiatric disabilities in rural Sweden: Experiences from the implementation of a national policy2009In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 495-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to analyse the implementation of a case manager-model in rural Sweden. A sample of 15 case managment team was selected. Written materials were collected and interviews on location were carried out. Results: rural case managers design their work methods themselves, wich entail several deviations from the national guidelines in this field. The case managers boards have a low capacity to direct and manage the activities of the case managers. Consequently, case managers develop into welfare entrepreneurs. One salient risk is that teams become isolated from the surrounding welfare system. In conclusion, the Swedish version of case management in rural areas is a result of local processes of adaptation and negotiations that result in services that differ from those envisaged in national policy guidelines.

  • 7.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Book review. Global leaders for social work education. The IASSW presidents 1928-2008, by Friedrich W. Siebel:  2010In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 570-573Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Professional Discretion in Welfare Services: Beyond Street-level Bureaucracy2013In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 725-727Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Revitalising communities in a globalising world (ed. by Lena Dominelli)2009In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 264-266Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Näslund, Hilda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Service user entrepreneurs and claims to authority: a case study in the mental health area2019In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health service user movements have historically to a large extent employed collective forms of mobilisation, where people with service user experience have joined in formal organisations or informal groups. Currently, expressions of service user engagement are changing, and we can now observe the growth of more individualised expressions, often enacted online. This article introduces the concept ‘service user entrepreneur’ (SUE), that relates to this development. SUEs are individuals with service user experience who have made a career of their engagement in mental health issues. Based on their individual narratives of mental ill-health, SUEs often express themselves in participatory media, hold lectures and write books on the subject. The aim of this article is to examine how SUEs in their communication establish authority. Applying case study methodology, we follow four Swedish SUEs involved in mental health issues and analyse their communication primarily in digital arenas. Intimate personal narratives, mobilisation of collectives and institutional perspectives constitute authority sources for SUEs. Balancing individual and collective narratives as well as maintaining a desirable level of vulnerability is a continuous effort. How SUEs manage these issues is further discussed.

  • 11.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Seyedmehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    A comparative study of experiences of client violence and its impact among Iranian and Swedish social workers2015In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 129-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Client violence toward social workers has been recognized as a serious problem and major concern has been raised with regard to its impacts on social workers’ practice, and physical and psychological health. There is recognition among researchers and policy makers that it is time for international social work community to develop conventions and agreements to address this issue globally. A cross-cultural study between Sweden and Iran was conducted to compare and contrast levels of violence between the two countries. Prevalence of violence was 72% in Sweden and 68% in Iran. Iranian social workers show a significantly higher increase in general mental health problems regarding client violence, compared to Swedish social workers. Despite differences in rules and regulations between Sweden and Iran, client violence was found common in two countries. Preventive policies for detecting potential violence situation are good but not enough. We suggest taking actions on building trust and supportive structures within organisations.

  • 12.
    Sundqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Kenneth, Ögren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Collaboration patterns among Swedish professionals in the repatriation of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children: an explorative study2016In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 901-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores patterns of collaboration between Swedish professionals involved in the repatriation of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children. A qualitative case study methodology was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 20 statutory social workers, social workers at care homes, police officers, Swedish Migration Board officers, and legal guardians. A thematic approach was used to analyse the data. The results showed low levels of collaboration among the professionals and the use of different strategies by the professionals to manage their work tasks. Patterns were found among the professionals: some tended to isolate themselves from interaction and acted on the basis of personal preference, and others tended to behave sensitively, withdraw, and become passive observers rather than active partners in the repatriation process. These behaviours made it difficult for the relevant professionals to employ dignity and efficiency in the repatriation of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children.

  • 13.
    Wikström, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Swedish experience of sheltered housing and conflicting theories in use with special regards to honour related violence (HRV)2010In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 245-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One aspect of violence against women and children is what is referred to as honour related violence. Honour related violence (HRV) is a form of violence which is now on the agenda in several countries as a violation of human rights. From 2002 the Swedish government started paying serious attention to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the Swedish government programme dealing with HRV with special focus on sheltered housing as the prevalent measure to safeguard victims of HRV. Our results indicate that sheltered housing without doubt plays an important role for victims in the sense of providing short term safety. Notwithstanding the adequacy of sheltered housing as a means to provide support and safety, the outcome of the support is ambivalent in the long run. Our qualitative interviews of girls with previous experiences of staying at sheltered housing demonstrate the risk of the practice, turning one kind of control and isolation into another kind. The ambivalence of sheltered housing is further analysed in terms of conflicting logics of social work practices reflecting the Swedish conflicting discourses on HRV.

1 - 13 of 13
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