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  • 1.
    Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Poverty, welfare problems and social exclusion2008In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates whether, and to what degree, poverty is linked to other types of welfare problems and, in larger perspective, whether the situation can be understood in terms of social exclusion. Two different measures of poverty – income poverty and deprivation poverty – and 17 indicators of welfare problems were used in the analysis. It was shown that income poverty was rather weakly related to other types of welfare problems, i.e. the most commonly used measure of poverty seems to discriminate a section of the population that does not suffer from the kinds of problems we usually assume that poverty causes. Deprivation poverty, identifying those who most often had to forgo consumption of goods and services, did correlate strongly with other types of welfare problems. Hence, people living under poor conditions do suffer from welfare problems even though this section of the population is not always captured by income poverty measures. The final analysis showed that the types of welfare problems that were most likely to cluster were deprivation poverty, economic precariousness, unemployment, psychological strain and health problems. Whether these types of accumulated welfare problems, from a theoretical perspective, can be seen as indicators of social exclusion is more doubtful.

  • 2.
    Hollander, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University.
    Jacobsson, Maritha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Defender, spokesperson, therapist: representing the true interest of the client in therapeutic law2007In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 373-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse the role of the legal representative in therapeutic law, specifically in Swedish administrative court hearings relating to compulsory care. Data are collected from three types of cases where a health or social welfare authority argues that it is necessary to apply coercion to a citizen: the Care of Young Persons (Special Provisions) Act, the Care of Alcohol and Drug Abusers (Special Provisions) Act and the Compulsory Psychiatric Care Act. The data consist of audio-recordings from 39 hearings, supplemented by 28 interviews with participants in these hearings, and court documents. Three primary roles of the legal representatives are identified: defender, spokesperson and therapist. We show how the primary role of the attorney becomes that of the spokesperson, but also that the role of the therapist takes precedence over that of the defender.

  • 3.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Gender and health among older people: What is the role of social policies?2018In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 236-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated how social policies moderate the association between gender and health among older people across European countries. The study is the first to take a comprehensive view on the role of social policies in connection with gender inequality in health among older Europeans. The association between gender and poor self-rated health and limiting long-standing illness was investigated in a multilevel framework. Cross-level interaction effects showed that more generous minimum pensions, higher spending on eldercare and a higher degree of eldercare formalisation are associated with relatively better health among women, while more generous standard pensions are associated with relatively better health among men. The conclusion is that policies directed towards older people are not gender neutral; rather they are likely to affect men and women differently. By shaping the distribution of resources as well as of unpaid work, social policies can contribute to either strengthening or weakening the link between gender and health.

  • 4.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Suspicious minds: local context and attitude variation across Swedish municipalities2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates whether degree of suspicion of welfare abuse relates to local context in Sweden. It is suggested that certain features of Swedish municipalities can create a local information bias influencing individual suspicion of welfare abuse. Prevalence of social problems and political climate are features of the municipal context having the potential to influence opinion formation. Social problems are captured by local unemployment, social assistance and ill-health rates. Political climate is captured by electoral support for conservatives. The results indicate that local context can influence suspicion of welfare abuse, contexts where social problems are widespread reduce such suspicion. While local political climate seems important in itself, it also interacts with social problem level, increasing suspicion if a conservative political climate and social problems coexist. While social problems seem to generate less suspicion regarding social policy abuse, they also provide 'raw material' for political rhetoric regarding suspicion.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Leonard, Rosemary
    Social Justice and Social Change, University of Western Sydney.
    Noonan, Kerrie
    Social Justice and Social Change, University of Western Sydney.
    Caring and the generation of social capital: two models for a positive relationship2012In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When caring is linked to social capital it is generally assumed that the nature of the relationship is that social capital is a resource that can be used for care work. When there is inadequate funding of aged care services by the State then social capital may be seen as a substitute for economic and human capital. Caring therefore is seen as a drain on capital. However, this does not have to be the case. Aged care services, if thoughtfully designed, can not only consume social capital but also generate it. Two models of elder care, one Swedish and one Australian, have been identified which specifically address the generation of social capital. In each case the services and facilities have been developed by third sector organisations with a strong community development focus often in the face of resistance from state run or medically oriented services.

  • 6.
    Komp, Kathrin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Beland, Daniel
    Guest editorial: Balancing protection and productivity: International perspectives on social policies for older people2012In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 21, no Suppl. 1, p. S1-S7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Leonard, Rosemary
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney, NSW.
    Johansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Policy and practices to the active engagement of older people in the community: a comparison of Sweden and Australia2008In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares policy and practices for engaging older people in community life in Sweden and Australia. Barriers and support for active engagement through paid work, social activism, volunteering and aged services are compared. Both countries face issues of ageing populations, services for rural areas and people with small needs. Issues for Sweden were the absence of age discrimination legislation, availability of funds and lack of recognition of the growing levels of volunteering. Issues for Australia concerned the new managerialist approach to services, with associated complexities of access and limited social activism.

  • 8.
    Lövgren, Veronica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    ‘More time for what?’: Exploring intersecting notions of gender, work, age and leisure time among people with cognitive disabilities2015In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 263-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores intersecting notions of leisure among middle-aged people with intellectual disabilities in the setting of the Swedish welfare state. The participants are recipients of long-term disability services and have experienced the changing ideological frameworks of the welfare effort, which has recently focused on normalisation, inclusion and participation. Structured activities are arranged by disability services in order to normalise living conditions and provide recreation for disabled people. However, the range of activities is constrained by financial resources, by notions of gender and age and by an institutionalised emphasis on the work ethic – leading to constructions of leisure partly as ‘time beside’ where ‘free time’ activities should not interfere with the duties of the working week. The participants’ limited resources and their lack of a strong voice limit their ability to demand their legal rights and leave many of them with ‘too much time with too little to do’.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The feeling of tiredness among Swedish parents: a longitudinal cohort comparison2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 424-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, there is an ongoing debate on how to combine work and family life, a problem many women face today. Implicit in this debate is that women are more affected by having children compared with women in earlier generations. This article presents a cohort study on how Swedish women and men's reported feelings of tiredness is affected by having children. Longitudinal results representing three cohorts show that both men and women in general report more feelings of tiredness in the early 2000s compared with the 1980s. Being a first-time mother or father is connected with more feelings of tiredness among the latest cohort studied. However, when control variables are included, the effect of becoming a first-time parent weakens, especially for men. Finally, the effect of becoming a first-time mother is no longer significant when controlling for age.

  • 10.
    Nordlund, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    What works best when?: The role of active labour market policy programmes in different business cycles2011In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At what point in a business cycle do the long-term unemployed gain most from participation in active labour market policy programmes (ALMP), as compared to openly unemployed? In this article, this question is studied from the perspective of individual human capital with the hazard of labour market exit and chances of future labour market stability and equal post-unemployment income as output variables. All the long-term unemployed in Sweden were followed on a four-year basis, with 1993 (recession) and 1999 (boom) as starting years. The study shows mainly positive effects among participants regardless of the state of the market. However, ALMP-training has a “bridging” effect over different labour market conditions and a quick return to the regular labour market is therefore not as important for the success of participation as it is among ALMP-employment participants.

  • 11.
    Nordlund, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Who are the lucky ones?: Heterogeneity in active labour market policy outcomes2011In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how the effects from investments in Active Labour Market Policy programmes (ALMPs) may be differently distributed due to the age and educational level of participants. Outcomes were measured as the chance of labour market inclusion, labour market stability and post-unemployment incomes. This longitudinal study captures long-term effects among 50,000 Swedes who entered unemployment in 1993. While the youngest gained most from ALMP- training, the oldest were best helped by ALMP-employment in reducing the risk of labour market exit. The lowest educated gained much from ALMP participation, although the effects were weaker than expected: those with a higher education gained more in terms of labour market stability from ALMP-training compared with the less educated persons. This result was interpreted in terms of a springboard effect, meaning that ALMP-training pushes higher educated people into further education in the regular educational arena.

  • 12.
    Weinehall, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Jonsson, Marie-Louise
    Women's Shelter, Karlskrona, Sweden .
    Women under protection: in hiding from violent men2009In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden in 2007, 11,047 people, out of a population of around nine million were living under at-risk conditions requiring protective measures for their safety. Sixty per cent were women, most of them hiding from men who had battered them and were still threatening and stalking them. In this research and intervention study, a group of women in hiding were given different kinds of support and 23 women were interviewed. These women struggle to make a living, work or study, and their finances are extremely strained. Their social networks/interactions are nonexistent. Living under constant threat and insecurity has an adverse impact on the women's health. The community is obliged, for economic and security reasons, to support battered women. There are still severe shortcomings with regard to security. One recommendation is the institution of personal protection officers, i.e. specially trained social service caseworkers able to support the woman once protection measures have been decided.

1 - 12 of 12
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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