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  • 1. Alghadir, A. H.
    et al.
    Anwer, S.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Iqbal, Z. A.
    Effect of localised vibration on muscle strength in healthy adults: a systematic review2018In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 18-24Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the effects of local vibration on muscle strength in healthy adults.

    Data sources The electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Science were searched using a combination of the following keywords: vibration, vibration therapy, power, maximal voluntary contraction, performance, rate of force development and vibratory exercise. In addition, the Medical Subject Headings 'vibration', 'strength' and 'exercise' were used. The bibliographical search was limited to articles published in English.

    Study selection Trials that evaluated the effect of localised vibration on muscle strength in healthy humans were included.

    Data extraction Two independent evaluators verified the quality of the selected studies using the PEDro Scale and the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing the risk of bias. Muscle strength was calculated for each intervention.

    Results In total, 29 full-text studies were assessed for eligibility. Eighteen studies did not match the inclusion criteria, and were excluded. The 11 studies included in this review had an average PEDro score of 5.36/10. Most of the studies reported significant improvements in muscle strength after the application of local vibration. There was considerable variation in the vibration training parameters and target muscle location.

    Conclusions The use of local vibration on the target muscle can enhance muscle strength in healthy adults. Further well-designed controlled studies are required to confirm the effect of local vibration training on muscle strength. 

  • 2. Anwer, Shahnawaz
    et al.
    Alghadir, Ahmad
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Al-Eisa, Einas
    Effect of whole body vibration training on quadriceps muscle strength in individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis2016In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 145-151Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Several studies have reported the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength. This systematic review investigates the current evidence regarding the effects of WBV training on quadriceps muscle strength in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Data sources We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, PEDro, and Science citation index for research articles published prior to March 2015 using the keywords whole body vibration, vibration training, strength and vibratory exercise in combination with the Medical Subject Heading 'Osteoarthritis knee'. Study selection This meta-analysis was limited to randomized controlled trials published in the English language. Data extraction The quality of the selected studies was assessed by two independent evaluators using the PEDro scale and criteria given by the International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions (ISMNI) for reporting WBV intervention studies. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane collaboration's tool for domain-based evaluation. Isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength was calculated for each intervention. Results Eighteen studies were identified in the search. Of these, four studies met the inclusion criteria. Three of these four studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Out of the four studies, only one study found significantly greater quadriceps muscle strength gains following WBV compared to the control group. Conclusions In three of the four studies that compared a control group performing the same exercise as the WBV groups, no additional effect of WBV on quadriceps muscle strength in individuals with knee OA was indicated.

  • 3.
    Blomqvist, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wester, Anita
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Test-retest reliability, smallest real difference and concurrent validity of six different balance tests on young people with mild to moderate intellectual disability2012In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Some studies have reported that people with intellectual disability may have reduced balance ability compared with the population in general. However, none of these studies involved adolescents, and the reliability and validity of balance tests in this population are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of six different balance tests and to investigate their concurrent validity.

    Design Test-retest reliability assessment.

    Settings All subjects were recruited from a special school for people with intellectual disability in Bollnas, Sweden.

    Participants Eighty-nine adolescents (35 females and 54 males) with mild to moderate intellectual disability with a mean age of 18 years (range 16 to 20 years).

    Interventions All subjects followed the same test protocol on two occasions within an 11-day period.

    Main outcomes Balance test performances.

    Results Intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.80 were achieved for four of the balance tests: Extended Timed Up and Go Test, Modified Functional Reach Test, One-leg Stance Test and Force Platform Test. The smallest real differences ranged from 12% to 40%; less than 20% is considered to be low. Concurrent validity among these balance tests varied between no and low correlation.

    Conclusion The results indicate that these tests could be used to evaluate changes in balance ability over time in people with mild to moderate intellectual disability. The low concurrent validity illustrates the importance of knowing more about the influence of various sensory subsystems that are significant for balance among adolescents with intellectual disability.

    (C) 2011 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Comparison of the 6-minute walk distance test performed on a non-motorised treadmill and in a corridor in healthy elderly subjects2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 234-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) test performed on a non-motorised treadmill (6MWD-T) with the 6MWD test performed in a corridor (6MWD-C) in healthy elderly subjects.

    PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen healthy elderly individuals.

    DESIGN: Participants performed three 6MWD-T tests and three 6MWD-C tests on two different days.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Distance walked was recorded in metres. Perceived exertion and leg fatigue were rated on the modified Borg scale before and after each test.

    RESULTS: Using the Bland and Altman limits of agreement analysis method, the mean difference between the two methods was 153.3m (limits of agreement: 28 to 278). The mean difference between days 1 and 2 for the 6MWD-C test was -7.2m (limits of agreement: -45.4 to 30.8), and the mean difference between days 1 and 2 for the 6MWD-T test was -1.6m (limits of agreement: -64.0 to 60.7). The mean difference between the first and second repetitions of the 6MWD-C test was -5m (limits of agreement: -41 to 31), and the mean difference between the first and second repetitions of the 6MWD-T test was -17m (limits of agreement: -85 to 51).

    CONCLUSIONS: The 6MWD-C and 6MWD-T tests are not interchangeable. However, the results showed good test-retest reliability between days and between test repetitions for both tests. Therefore, the 6MWD-T test may offer an alternative option to the 6MWD-C test when a 30-m corridor is not available. These findings may have implications for execution of the 6MWT-T test within cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 5. Peolsson, A.
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jull, G.
    Löfstedt, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    O'Leary, S.
    Preliminary evaluation of dorsal muscle activity during resisted cervical extension in patients with longstanding pain and disability following anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery2015In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 69-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare mechanical activity (deformation and deformation rate) of the dorsal neck muscles between individuals with longstanding symptoms after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery and healthy controls.

    Design Preliminary cross-sectional study.

    Setting Neurosurgery clinic.

    Participants Ten individuals {mean age 60 [standard deviation (SD) 7.111 who had undergone ACDF surgery 10 to 13 years previously and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls.

    Main outcomes Mechanical activity of the different layers of dorsal neck muscles, measured at the C4 segment using ultrasonography (speckle tracking analysis) during a standardised, resisted cervical extension task.

    Results A significant group x muscle interaction was found for muscle deformation (P<0.03) but not for deformation rate (P>0.79). The ACDF group showed significantly less deformation of the semispinalis capitis muscle during the extension task compared with the control group [mean 3.12 (SD 2.06) and 6.64 (SD 4.17), respectively; mean difference 3.34 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 7.21)].

    Conclusions As the semispinalis capitis muscle is a powerful neck extensor, the finding of altered activation following ACDF surgery lends support to the inclusion of exercise to train neck muscle performance in the management of these patients.

  • 6.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Occurence and type of neck pain among drivers of forest machines and the sociation with whole-body vibration exposere2007In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 93, p. S323-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Wolf, S L
    et al.
    Kwakkel, G
    Bayley, M
    McDonnell, M N
    Best practice for arm recovery post stroke: an international application.2016In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 102, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based application ('app') for post-stroke upper extremity rehabilitation that can be used globally by therapists.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three experienced neurorehabilitation therapists, applied scientists and physicians, and 10 consultants dedicated to the provision of best practice to stroke survivors.

    DESIGN: This team evaluated the evidence to support the timely and appropriate provision of interventions and the most defensible outcome measures during a 4-year voluntary information gathering and assimilation effort, as a basis for the sequencing of an algorithm informed by the data and directed by changes in impairment and chronicity.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the formulation of a testable app that will be available for minimal user cost. The app is for a smartphone, and the comments of a focus group (audience at a World Confederation for Physical Therapy 2015 presentation, approximate n=175) during a 30-minute 'Questions and Answers' session were assessed.

    RESULTS: Analysis of documented, extensive input offered by the audience indicated a highly favourable disposition towards this novel tool, with provision of concrete suggestions prior to launching the final version. Suggestions centred on: inclusion of instructions; visuals and demonstrations; monitoring of adverse responses; availability of updates; autonomous use by patients; and potential to characterise practice.

    CONCLUSIONS: A simple, user-friendly app for decision making in the treatment of upper extremity impairments following stroke is feasible and welcomed.

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